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  #61  
Old 04-05-2007
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Our boat was in Dinner key when Wilma passed directly over. It sustained some damage to stantions and a rub rail bruise. Plus the refrig electronics card exploded. i had left it on with a shore power feed plugged in. I think a brown out or power surge blew the refrig. Most of the boats in the mooring field near by piled up on the shore. Katrina wasn't as strong a storm at the point in her life that she crossed through Miami.

Some docks like Salinas Marina chase all their boats out when the hurricane threat level is imminent. So Jobos mangrove is their alternative. I am looking for advice or experience with this sort of task. What sort of place does one look for when anchoring near or tying up to the mangroves ? In Jobos there are large bays and narrow channels. Is one preferrable over the other ? What is it like jamming a bow into a mass of mangrove roots ? Is this a full throttle manuver or a hesitant little push ? When one ties off in the mangrove, what sort of prevention can one take regarding rodents ? Is this an issue at this point ? Is there a better direction to approach the mangrove from ?

Last edited by EscapadeCaliber40LRC; 04-05-2007 at 06:27 PM.
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  #62  
Old 04-05-2007
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Smaller bays are probably safer than narrow channels or large bays. The less distance the wind and the water have to build up speed and height the better off you will be. Also, the narrow channels tend to have stuff flow up and down them, so being out of them is probably better than being stuck in the middle of one. While I've never driven a boat into the mangroves, I'd imagine that you don't want full throttle, as getting back out will become an issue. You probably want larger mangrove trees rather than smaller ones, as their roots probably go deeper and they'll protect the boat from the force of the wind better.

As for rodents... they're probably not too much of a problem, as they're generally smart enough to get out of dodge when a storm is coming in. In the '05 Tsunami, most of the dead animals found were domestic ones, as the native animals fled before the tsunami hit. Same thing generally happens in a hurricane.

You also want at least three or four anchors out, with a fair amount of scope so that the winds and water don't batter the boat against the trees. Also, if the bay faces the opposite direction of the strongest winds, that would probably be ideal.
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  #63  
Old 04-06-2007
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If your in a good place in the mangroves you shoulnt need an anchor.
Put it in the narrowest channel you can with out having them rubbing the boat. and with with plenty of water under you. the windier the better.
You know which way the storm is comming from so you can predict the direction you want to be pointed. Anchor with the bow facing in the direction
you think the wind will come from in the begining of the storm. and then anchor the stern as well. then run your lines into the magroves. this is what we look for up here but we dont have mangroves we have water oaks and pine trees. When I tie my big boat down. i try not to tie to one tree unless its really massive. where I go there are no big trees so I run the lines out into the woolds and rope up as many trees as I can I have Three 300ft pieces of line expressly for this purpose.
some folks will leave their boat I prefer to be on mine. One its in a better place than my house. Two its self contained power, water so forth.
the problem is the surge right before the storm the water drops, this is why you need a deep channel. then as the storm comes in you start to rise. if you arent there to adjust you could wind up pulling all the cleats off your boat, depending on how high the surge is. During ivan i went down five feet then rose close to ten. thats a pretty big swing if you arent there to adjust
your lines they could get very tight. I don't know if Florida bay suffers from this but I imagine it does. If you find the right size channel your boat would have the anchor straight in front of the boat lines lead forward off both sides of the bow and stern lines lead aft. and a couple of breast lines. and the other anchor straight behind you . remember there will be a lot of current as the water moves in and out with the stom.
If you can only tie one side of your boat to the trees the anchors go at a 45* angles off the bow and stern and if you have extra put them out also.
When you anchor add some extra scope above your normal storm range to account for surge. When the water starts to rise you will want to slack off the tree lines. let the anchors come tight, slack the tree lines this will keep you out of the woolds. at one point during Ivan I had no tention on my bow line slacked off on my stern anchor to get the wind on the other side of the bow. when It came over the bow line went tight an we hauled in on the anchor to keep us pointed in to the wind. It had more east in than I thought it would. We were side tied to the trees and had anchors on one side.
The whole trick is getting the boat pointed into the wind at the begining when its the worst. so the lee side of a key or hammock get your bow lines runnig to the mangroves and put your anchor spread off the stern three anchors would be the least I would want in this case. But for me I like being surrounded. If the leading edge hits you in the face the trailing edge will kick you in the butt.
hope this helps
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  #64  
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The reason for the large surge along the Gulf Coast is due to the slope of the continental shelf..If you are on the East Coast you will not see the same surge as the shelf drops off quicker...
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Surge seems to be storm and location specific. When Francis hit Vero beach 85 miles North of Dinner Key, Dinner Key experienced no surge at all. For three days the winds blew but the water never came in. We were far enough away from the center of the track. When Wilma came over, even though it approached from the land side of Dinner Key, there was a moderate surge, it lifted all the free planks on the dock and floated them away leaving just the dock structure for those on boats to crawl upon when trying to get back to shore. One risk with docks and slips is having the boat lifted then stoved by the pilings.
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  #66  
Old 04-06-2007
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Last year in the Chesapeake with some of the storms that came late in the year. The wind blew the water out of the creeks and lower bay. I saw more then a few sailboats almost keeled over, listing to one side and sitting in mud.
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The ambiguous thing with mangroves is not knowing ahead of time where your specific location will be. You have options but you need to commit at many points ahead of any storm. You also don't really know what others about you will be planning. I have two general places in mind right now both are in different directions once I leave the bay. The options start narrowing when one commits. Luck and chance start becoming a large factor.

I know a great little channel just near the mouth of Salinas harbor, it could hold a number of boats. If one were in Salinas it would be a good first choice but for me now it is quite far down the list of my choices since my starting location is miles away and the whole Jobos mangrove bay is in between.
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Soul Searcher - are your three lines three strand or braided and what diameter ? I have one large and long piece of three strand. Its intended use is for a sea anchor but would make a great hurricane line. I have some braided lines that are halyard length that I could also use for hurricane tie down.
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Its Three strand nylon, very stretchy 5/8 . Halyads dont stretch much.
I put an eye in one end loop it over the cleat run the line around about a dozen trees and back to the boat. makes it easier when it's time to leave. you can get your line back from the boat. no crawling around with the moccasins and rattlers. if it sticks you can pull on it with the boat.
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  #70  
Old 04-06-2007
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About lines. Three-strand generally resists abrasion and deals with rough surfaces better than double-braid lines, as the rough surfaces tend to pick out the braid. A harder finish line is generally better than a softer one. Chafe protection is key to preserving the lines that keep your boat in place. During a big storm, the biggest dangers to lines are chafe and internal friction—so use chafe protection that allows water through to cool and lubricate the nylon.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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