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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > General Discussion (sailing related)
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  #21  
Old 04-15-2007
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Boasun will become famous soon enough Boasun will become famous soon enough
Horsing on the anchor rhode or a mooring bouy line is normal for boats and ships to do. But some vessels seem to horse more then others. Much to the concern of the people on board. And they had used about every trick in the book to reduce it.
It isn't the length of the scope of the anchor rhode, but the windage forward and the underbody shape that affects this phenomena. I.E. fin keeled boats are worst then full keeled boats. Mainly because they are lighter weight and more susceptible to the forces of the weather elements.
A flat cut storm sail rigged from your after stay will reduce much of the horsing to a more livable situation. It will help weathercock the vessel more and try hanging a metal bucket off the bow as a drogue if your boat is small enough for it to have effect. The latter is a course of last resort after all else has been tried. Or set two anchors at about 45 to 60 degree angle from the bow and see if that works. Or have the second anchor on a short rhode to hammerlock your vessel. But if you have reversing currents/wind you could end up with two anchor rhodes twisted together. Not fun to untangle.
But the next step is to Stream moor... I.E. An anchor out forward and an anchor out astern. and after that is to either med moor or go along side a pier.
Note: a med moor is using your anchor and running a mooring line or two to shore.
Then the court of very last resort is to put the boat up on the hard.

Last edited by Boasun; 04-15-2007 at 03:50 PM.
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  #22  
Old 04-15-2007
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RickBowman is an unknown quantity at this point
I have never owned a vessel where anchoring by the stern was a viable option as the ground tackle was at the bow. Putting the stern to the wind at anchor would not be my first choice on a monohull. I have used an anchor sail on a 4,000 lb displacement trailer sailor and it didn't work worth a dogs breath and proved on that particular vessel a complete waste of money for the intended purpose.

Last edited by RickBowman; 04-16-2007 at 10:06 AM.
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