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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
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  #11  
Old 04-26-2007
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You would be surprised at the things that will give you an added knot. I have not sailed a catalina 25, but I imagine it is beamy. That being said, heel will make a difference for you. the beam on my boat is 11'3", not too bad for 34', but not a racer either. Anyway, if I have the main sheeted and I am heeled to 30 degrees, rail in the water, and am doing 5.5 knots, I can drop the traveler or ease the sheet or both, bring the angle back up to 20 degrees and gain a knot. Like others said here, it is different on every design. But that works well for me.
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  #12  
Old 04-26-2007
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Try these 2 guides from Quantum on mainsails and headsails!
http://www.quantumsails.com/pdf/head...im%20guide.pdf
http://www.quantumsails.com/pdf/main...im%20guide.pdf

Short and sweet.
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  #13  
Old 04-26-2007
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You would be surprised at the things that will give you an added knot.
Probably one of the most effective would be to start sailing a CS instead of a Catalina
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Old 04-26-2007
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Thanks Guys

I have really enjoyed the information and reference I have been able to mooch off scrap's thread. I am just starting my monohull phase and I can't believe how much I miss those battens. It's hard to believe I have to learn sail trim 101 all over again.
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Old 04-27-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skrap1r0n
Hull Speed for a Catalina 25 is 6.31 kts, so in all fairness, I am within a knot of that point. I just have a feeling, that eeking out that last knot will be tough. I will try out my 150% this coming weekend, as I have yet to raise that sail.
Look up the terms "polars" and "velocity made good". Most boats have a favoured point of sail, an angle to the apparent wind direction that allows the straightest tracking (without "lee"...another interesting term or "weather helm") with the most efficient sail set. For most modern boats, this a a reach, or roughly halfway between dead to wind and a beam reach (90 degrees to the boat). Other boats like the wind aft of the beam.

If a polar doesn't exist for your boat (unlikely), you can make one yourself, but only a racer would bother. Just time yourself point to point and you will soon find the combination that will get you hull speed...and what sail set will kill it!

By the way, a Catalina 25 should be able to surf downwind. That's a whole different thing. I've gone 12 knots on a Newport 27, a speed I've never done on my own boats.
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Old 04-27-2007
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ok I have heard this term a bunch of times, but what exactly does it mean when a sailboat surfs? Is that like a surfboard surfing? gaining speed coming down a wave?
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Old 04-27-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skrap1r0n
ok I have heard this term a bunch of times, but what exactly does it mean when a sailboat surfs? Is that like a surfboard surfing? gaining speed coming down a wave?
Pretty much, it means that the boat has managed to exceed hull speed... usually happens going downwind and only on certain types of boats... J/24s surf pretty well.
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  #18  
Old 04-30-2007
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What you may find is that the bigger the sail, sometimes is not the answer to make your boat go faster or reach her top speed. As mentioned, you may make the boat heel too much and lose power. It matters if your sail has been blown out, how well it keeps its shape, etc. I know that my working jib is a much better and more powerful sail than my gennys going to windward and holds its shape better. Obviously wind strength plays a big role to achieving your top speed as well.

Also, how much weight or extra weight do you have on your boat? When was the last time you cleaned her underside? Do you have a jib pole? Are you reaching or running the boat to get top speed? Each boat has a slightly different optimum point of sail.

I find the best way to get that last little drop of speed out of your boat is just play around with it and watch your tachometer or gps on a steady wind day as someone else mentioned because every boat is different. One of your best and simplest trim tactics I agree would be your tell tales. Olympic dinghie racers will tell you that their best trim tool is a tell tale - Its your best way of visualizing smooth flow of an invisible substance.

My formula: 1 start by holding your course and setting your sails to just above luff point, maybe a little tighter. Watch your telltales. Make sure they fly straight back on both sides of the sail.

2 On your foresail, make sure your foot and your leech are firm, and not flapping This is important because it may mean your block is too far forward or back. Watch your telltales and adjust your jibsheet after you have set the block.

3 On Your Main, check your outhaul. You can lose a lot or gain a lot of power with a small adjustment here. Make sure it isn't too tight (close hauling or high wind) or too loose. You can tell by using your tell tales. All of them up and down the forward edge and the trailing edge of your main should be streaming back. Make sure the sail is not twisted too much in a vertical sense, if it is, adjust things until it isn't (vang, main sheet, outhaul, topping lift). Telltales will let you know when everything is right.

Your backstay tensioner can also make a difference, again, use your telltales.
You would only really worry about your mast rake from the backstay if your main sailshape is too flat. Usually, dont even worry about the backstay.

the rule of thumb for sails is that the more you let them fill or more rounded you let them fill, the more power you get out of them. Think of an airplane wing. However, as the wind picks up to high you don't need as much power and you flatten your sail out. tighten things to flatten that wing shape.

Of course you can refine your trim even more with other little things.

Use your telltales, they are invaluable. Play around with all your gadgets until your telltales fly true. Its that simple.
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  #19  
Old 05-01-2007
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More books: Race Winning Strategies by Tom Linskey and The Tactics of Small Boat Racing by Stuart H. Walker. Obviously not specific to your tpe of boat, are fairly informative in general. And of course, as greggus said, experience. By the way, that an SV650 I see?
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  #20  
Old 05-01-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bermuda30
By the way, that an SV650 I see?
noooo Thats a Triumph Sprint RS. About 300 more CC's then the SV.

At any rate, I went out this weekend and there was absolutely NO wind. None at all. I had the sails up anyway, and was able to actually play with stuff. I need to rework ALL my running rigging, especially My outhaul and cunningham. For all intents and purposes, I have no outhaul. It looks like the previous owner just tied the clew off. There is no way to adjust it, and the cunningham is non existant. Just an lonely, empty cringle...
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