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  #11  
Old 05-01-2007
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If you are saying in effect, well that would be the hassle of buying a boat crossed off, remember that aint the end of the hassles.
I also suspect that if you "love " the boat that is a good enough reason to buy is bunkum. I have a sneaking suspicion I might have loved a few women until I spoke to them.
If you are doing an ocean passage in a couple of weeks and have not done them much, I suggest that will give you more than enough to digest, and one boat comes one boat goes. The romance may lessen after a few days hanging over the side. Bit like a honeymoon really.
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  #12  
Old 05-01-2007
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An excerpt from an article titled:
“From Family Cruiser to Single-Handed Transatlantic
The Bayfield 32”

“Bob decided to sail the northern route back across the Atlantic during the race - a hard drive to windward. After many days of rough on-the-wind work the teak backing block for the bobstay fitting for the extended ketch rig bowsprit began to crush. The forestay sagged and seawater began spurting through the loosened bolt holes.”

Full article here:
boats.com - Boat Review/Test: From Family Cruiser to Single-Handed Transatlantic
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  #13  
Old 05-01-2007
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I generally don't recommend teak as a backing block for much of anything. It has relatively little compressive strength, and using it as a backing block is rather stupid IMHO for that reason. If the backing block had been made of marine plywood, aluminum, or stainless steel, I doubt that this would have been a problem.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #14  
Old 05-01-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
I generally don't recommend teak as a backing block for much of anything. It has relatively little compressive strength, and using it as a backing block is rather stupid IMHO for that reason. If the backing block had been made of marine plywood, aluminum, or stainless steel, I doubt that this would have been a problem.
I second the word 'stupid' and remove the 'humble' part as there is no good reason to expect a single grained block of wood of any type to properly spread out the forces involved in a backing plate's job.
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  #15  
Old 05-01-2007
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Here's a pic of a Bayfield 32 bowsprit:



I don't know if this is a typical setup for the Bayfield, but this one doesn't look too sturdy.

Last edited by TSteele65; 05-01-2007 at 08:44 AM.
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Old 05-01-2007
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That bowsprit attachment does seem like a very weak link -




By the slender dimension of the bulwarks and unreinforced teak pulpit, it's not surprising to me that it got ripped off in heavy weather. By comparison - here's a properly reinforced bow pulpit -




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Old 05-01-2007
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Kacper...I'm not a big fan of bowsprits in general for the reasons cited above. That said...it is almost always a bob-stay issue when they let go. I had a friend on another boat that lost his bowsprit when his bobstay let go...there is just no way the sprit is going to stay in place without that offsetting downward force no matter how ruggedly constructed. In his case the issue was traced to a lower bobstay fitting that was corroded.
I like the B32 and believe she is a sturdy, ocean going boat and if you can assure yourself that the bobstay and fittings are or can be made fairly bullet-proof, I would not hesitate to go ahead with your purchase. Like any other piece of standing rigging...it is a point of failure, and the fact that it is constantly washed in salt water means you need to pay careful attention to it...but I don't think it is a reason to reject an otherwise fine boat that presently has no known bowsprit problems. Good luck on your decision.
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Old 05-01-2007
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Thanks Stan...

Quote:
Originally Posted by christyleigh
I second the word 'stupid' and remove the 'humble' part as there is no good reason to expect a single grained block of wood of any type to properly spread out the forces involved in a backing plate's job.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #19  
Old 05-01-2007
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Kac,

As it is obvious, that's not my type of boat, for several reasons.

I think (just personally) you are being driven by "looks" love, and "need a boat pronto" disease, to satisfy "inner urges" for a boat, to chase your lets go away crusing dream. Nothing wrong with it.....

I think you should go on your Atlantic ride, learn to sail properly, get experience, I mean experience on a boat, out in the ocean....learn things you still need to learn.....then.... buy your boat, that you decide on...

I mean if you don't know the answer to your question, at this point, maybe its too early to get into those weird looking boats, maybe you should get a simpler design boat.

Just look at the design of the thing, all by yourself, don't get opinions...you look at it......I don't know the boat, but from looking at photos, seems a weak design...I can see that bow hitting a wave going down and the pressure on the board breaking it...

Get on the Ocean, learn, and then decide by yourself....
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Old 05-01-2007
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Hi guys,

thank you for the tips on the bobstay and bowsprit fittings and supports. I am taking another look at it today and will probably make my decision today.

Giu - thank you for the advice, I think you may be right on all accounts I have been emotionally driven by the whole thing the whole time... but... then agian, who isn't emotional about sailing? lol

Going off on this trip would probably be the wiser choice. Especially that I wont be here for a month to look after the boat.

It would be like getting married while drunk then going off to war and coming home realizing what you've done !
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