Too small for offshore? - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 02-19-2002
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Posts: 112
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
walt123 is on a distinguished road
Too small for offshore?

Totally depends on your skill level, desire and most importand Physical condition. The smaller the boat the more you get "beat" about in side and the motion is usually much quicker and not plesant for some. If your physically and mentally prepared the boat should be fine. I''m sure it will stand up to the sea much better then you will.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 02-25-2002
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
pegleg is on a distinguished road
Too small for offshore?

Hello all & Lee, It;s snowing here in Denver ,soooo thought I''d take time to comment.some time ago i got into west marine website -found west advisor site of coast guard reguierments ,as I have a mac26x ,it was interesting .(STUFF)needed and recommended for boats over 24ft that sail inland lakes- offshore,raceing, and coastal,was very informative. some of the (STUFF) recommended which I don''t have makes me think twice about going on certian (adventuers) without them . safty for my crew is formost. Dreaming and planning is sometimes more then half the fun of sailing, especially if you live in colorado .waiting for summer . My 2cents worth. Pegleg Louis
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 02-25-2002
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Posts: 23
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
lee_1999 is on a distinguished road
Too small for offshore?

Hey Pegleg,

I''m from Colorado too! I live in the Florissant area and usually sail at Lake Dillon. Some good winds there!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 02-25-2002
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 629
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
kimberlite is on a distinguished road
Too small for offshore?

if you really want to see what is required of an offshore boat go to www.orc.org
select class 1 monohulls and it will give you the offshore racing councils requirements for any boat in a race or cruising in offshore environments.
one of my crew has a mcgregor and it is a fine boat for protected waters, but i for one would not take it offshore.
i am sure some people will but not me.
eric
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 02-25-2002
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 629
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
kimberlite is on a distinguished road
Too small for offshore?

i would have to disagree with you.
i think bigger is better. having been in a fair amount of heavy weather offshore.i find that a small boat is like spindrift in
big weather and a very uncomfortable ride. you get blown all around. while a bigger boat has a greater mass to move and moves more slowly and is much more comfortable. The bigger boat also has more room for stowage and creature comforts.
eric
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 02-27-2002
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
pegleg is on a distinguished road
Too small for offshore?

Hi lee-Nice to see others from landlocked areas that are into other forms of getting info on sailing .these pc have really made the world a smaller place. The wife and I try to get up to dillon once a year to celbrate our anniversary in August . If you like contact me via our e-mail at
ebottolfso@aol.com
Regards , Pegleg
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 03-03-2002
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 23
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Dana125 is on a distinguished road
Too small for offshore?

I like small boats, too. Own a Westerly 25 and moving up to a Dana 24. Both are on the heavy/moderately heavy displacement side. This does help dampen the "getting thrown about" feeling that small boats can suffer.

Biggest advantage is that these small boats can be single-handed with relative ease, but strong at the same time.

The Westerly doesn''t have an inboard; that''s why I''m moving to the Dana. I want an inboard Diesel for offshore/serious coastal sailing.

If you''re going offshore, even for short trips, I think the strength of the hull and rigging is important. Practice your heavy weather tactics, too. Have a plan and the gear.

On the affordable pocket cruiser side, how about looking at the Westerly 26'' Centaur. It has similar displacement to the Dana, and there were over 2500 made. Great production run.

With a bigger budget, how about a Dana. Danas have made many successful ocean passages, and as a tribute to its success, it''s still in production.

Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 03-03-2002
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 23
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Dana125 is on a distinguished road
Too small for offshore?

I like small boats, too. Own a Westerly 25 and moving up to a Dana 24. Both are on the heavy/moderately heavy displacement side. This does help dampen the "getting thrown about" feeling that small boats can suffer.

Biggest advantage is that these small boats can be single-handed with relative ease, but strong at the same time.

The Westerly doesn''t have an inboard; that''s why I''m moving to the Dana. I want an inboard Diesel for offshore/serious coastal sailing.

If you''re going offshore, even for short trips, I think the strength of the hull and rigging is important. Practice your heavy weather tactics, too. Have a plan and the gear.

On the affordable pocket cruiser side, how about looking at the Westerly 26'' Centaur. It has similar displacement to the Dana, and there were over 2500 made. Great production run.

With a bigger budget, how about a Dana. Danas have made many successful ocean passages, and as a tribute to its success, it''s still in production.

Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 03-04-2002
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Abigail50 is on a distinguished road
Too small for offshore?

Hi - I sail a Halcyon 23'' on the English East Coast and in the English Channel so got interested in this debate.

What did you mean by ''offshore''? One of the restrictions I find, given space/comfort considerations, is that it does take a long time to go places. My longest single trip in this boat has been about 23 hours.To get to France would take at least that, and actually wouldn''t be much fun.

So I do quite a lot of serious coastal sailing, with quite long hops, but things to see, ports of refuge etc, but I can keep going if the sailing is good.

The Halcyon 23 has an inboard engine and a self-draining cockpit, both of which help. She also has a good suite of headsails, giving lots of choice. (I don''t like depending on roller reefing!) I also had reefing points put in for slab reefing; previously she only had on boom roller reefing. This took rather too long (as a scary 15 minutes in the Thames taught me one day!) so I only use it for show.

As you say - there are lots of stories about people doing amazing things in such boats. I suggest the key criteria are
(i) comfort - for all the crew. Can you get comfortable off watch/make a good sustaining meal underway/get to the heads without being sick. If there are lots of noes to this lot, it simply might not be fun!
(ii) sailing experience of you and crew. We all make mistakes, and certainly I learn everytime I step on board. So I do a little bit more than I think I can handle, and go a bit further all the time.

Obviously, you want your boat to be seaworthy (not leaking, not overly tender, proper nav lights etc etc), but these two factors seem to me far more important than a simple assessment of size or hull material.

Good luck and fair winds.

Sarah
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 03-04-2002
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 629
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
kimberlite is on a distinguished road
Too small for offshore?

Sarah,
how long would it take to sail from guernsey to La rochelle france at 6 knots?
thanks
eric
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
small rooftop sailboats crashtom Learning to Sail 18 01-09-2009 10:05 AM
Small Catamarn DaySailors nicholsp Boat Review and Purchase Forum 2 07-01-2004 05:22 AM
the perfect 20'' cruising boat? jbarros Boat Review and Purchase Forum 14 04-18-2004 06:45 PM
Need a small piece of Teak bottomfeeder Gear & Maintenance 3 03-08-2004 07:16 PM
Small boat cooking jbarros Provisioning 14 02-08-2004 11:04 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:36 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.