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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
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  #21  
Old 03-06-2002
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Dana125 is on a distinguished road
Too small for offshore?

Abigail50: Sarah, Hear Hear! Your advisce is good, and your sailing adventures sound wonderful. I envy you. I will own Gypsy, my 1967 Westerly 25 only a short while more. As you know, she was built in Plymouth, and I look forward to the day when I can sail a bit in England.
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  #22  
Old 03-06-2002
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Too small for offshore?

Hi Dana125, your boat description caught my attention. I sail with a group of sailors on 150 mile long Lake Sakakawea in North Dakota and our Westerly fleet keeps growing every year., there are 5 on the lake this coming season. Anyway, the sailing buddy that influenced my purchase of a Centaur, previously owned a 25 ft westerly also named GYPSY...He has also moved up in size to the Centaur.....Rick
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  #23  
Old 03-07-2002
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TopKnott is on a distinguished road
Too small for offshore?

This may all depend on how well prepared the sailor and vessel are handle various conditions. Read some Tristan Jones "lessons from a single hander" and Slocum and you''ll find plenty advice on offshore and smaller vessels.
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  #24  
Old 03-08-2002
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Too small for offshore?

Hi,
Hope Im not repeating something already posted(I didnt read all the post),but I recently saw a show on TV about this single hander who struck an object in the ocean and sank.He managed to get his raft afloat and then began to drift for 60 days or more.
He survived and still sails from what the show said.His "vessel" as it were,kept him going,and it was just a small raft.
It didnt mention if he drifted and encountered storms or what.But it made me think of buying a steel hull craft!

Jerry
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Old 03-12-2002
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Too small for offshore?

ndsailor,
Of course. GYPSY is for sale; the Dana is going in across the bay from you at Bay Point. Also have a slip at Indian Hills (ROVIN'' TAR was there last year for a couple or three weeks), and if they ever get the marina built at New Town, we''ll have a slip there, too. We''ll be out of town for the annual Dam Ball, but will catch up to you shortly. Looking forward to seeing you.
Drew
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  #26  
Old 03-13-2002
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Too small for offshore?

Hi again.

It would of course take ages to go from Guernesey to La Rochelle at the 4 knots I''m lucky to average in a 23 footer - let alone 6 knots. But that was partly my point. If you sail small, then of course you sail slower. You might like that of course - frankly the difference is pretty meaningless seriously offshore, and I''m not into racing very much so I''m not sailing to go anywhere fast!

I do want to sell my Hushwing, because I do actually want a bigger boat. But the question was about what sort of sailing is safe in a smaller one. To me comfort is a really important safety question - a sick, cold, tired and hungry crew makes more mistakes.

Beyond that, if it''s what someone can afford, can sail and enjoys - good luck and fair winds to them.

Sarah
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Old 03-13-2002
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Too small for offshore?

jerry039,

Good idea. A steel hull is very difficult to hole.

Is the book you mentioned authored by Steven Calahan?
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