"Blue Water Boats?" "Rescues" - Page 3 - SailNet Community
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post #21 of 38 Old 06-28-2007
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Quote:
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Hilarious story. On my way over to bumfuzzle for the full version now...
Your afternoon was just shot to hell, then...

I think it is actually real, but I am not positive.
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post #22 of 38 Old 06-28-2007
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It is real. The boat has now been sold. Who would buy it??!!!
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post #23 of 38 Old 06-28-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arbarnhart
Your afternoon was just shot to hell, then...

I think it is actually real, but I am not positive.
No kidding. I'd heard a few references to the site but didn't realize how much material they had actually posted. They are still moored in Ft. Lauderdale and I had to get back to work. :S
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post #24 of 38 Old 06-28-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camaraderie
It is real. The boat has now been sold. Who would buy it??!!!
Who was dumb enough to buy it? Especially given the thorough documentation of all the problems they had with that Charter Cats boat when they bought it new....

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #25 of 38 Old 06-28-2007
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Jesus, I had to buy them a pizza and a six pk.

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post #26 of 38 Old 06-28-2007
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Not to hijack the thread, but I often wonder how I'll teach myself everything I need to know to take off some day. I've read stories about storms that make me nervous about my 23' on a small lake, and find myself more concerned with trying to know ahead of time how to handle the dangers that may lie in my future (both short- and long-term).

I'm thinking about taking classes in San Francisco bay, since it's supposed to be pretty challenging. I can't imagine how someone would gain "storm experience" gently, and really am concerned about how to get the training that may help me survive. I think crewing with experienced sailors is a great option, but it seems that opportunity and schooling rarely come together.

At what point in a sailor's experience does one decide they're ready to take on risks?
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post #27 of 38 Old 06-28-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by superdave
Not to hijack the thread, but I often wonder how I'll teach myself everything I need to know to take off some day. I've read stories about storms that make me nervous about my 23' on a small lake, and find myself more concerned with trying to know ahead of time how to handle the dangers that may lie in my future (both short- and long-term).

I'm thinking about taking classes in San Francisco bay, since it's supposed to be pretty challenging. I can't imagine how someone would gain "storm experience" gently, and really am concerned about how to get the training that may help me survive. I think crewing with experienced sailors is a great option, but it seems that opportunity and schooling rarely come together.

At what point in a sailor's experience does one decide they're ready to take on risks?
You might be ready the day You stop asking yourself theese questions.

You may go training, get 'certificates', get experience, You are not ready until You have the self confidence in Your ability of handling what You might expect to meet. It is perhaps as much a mental 'qualification' as a practical.
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post #28 of 38 Old 06-28-2007
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I have been wondering that also. I want to graduate from being a tiny boat sailor to cruising over the next few years. I am considering building a micro cruiser (I have a bit of building experience) and doing some coastal sailing. The boat I would likely build is Matt Layden's Paradox; in fact I already have the plans. It's a really small 14' single handed sailor that seals up pretty tightly, has a shallow draft (you can get it on and off a beach) self rights and is somewhat over engineered to be tough as nails. The good news is that it is a fairly safe boat, especially fo its size, in just about any weather. But the flip side is that you could get away with some pretty bad habits in a boat like that and feel like you know what you're doing.
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post #29 of 38 Old 06-28-2007
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Dave... I would never suggest someone go out in a storm for experience...but going out in 20-30 knots in relatively protected waters like SF Bay gives you the opportunity to practice and know how your boat reacts in heavier winds and seas. You can practice heaving to/ setting a drogue/ reefing/ setting storm sails etc. so that when you do get caught out in something heavier...you know WHAT to do and HOW to do it and it isn't book theory...just harder than on the day you practiced.

My first rule is not to be where the weather gets bad at the time of year it gets bad. Second rule is to get all the weather info I can every day and avoid the bad stuff insofar as is possible. Sooner or later you'll be caught out in a gale...but storms can usually be avoided if you stick to the first two rules! I'm sure othes opinions may differ...but that's my way of minimizing the risk.
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post #30 of 38 Old 06-29-2007
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Often, the only real way to gain heavy weather experience is to go out in heavy weather. Work your way up to heavier weather slowly.... and make sure you've got the proper emergency gear aboard the boat. It also helps quite a bit to have storm sails, drogues and other severe weather gear to use, and get familiar with, but I highly recommend you try practicing the use of them in good weather until you can use them by instinct. Same thing with reefing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by superdave
Not to hijack the thread, but I often wonder how I'll teach myself everything I need to know to take off some day. I've read stories about storms that make me nervous about my 23' on a small lake, and find myself more concerned with trying to know ahead of time how to handle the dangers that may lie in my future (both short- and long-term).

I'm thinking about taking classes in San Francisco bay, since it's supposed to be pretty challenging. I can't imagine how someone would gain "storm experience" gently, and really am concerned about how to get the training that may help me survive. I think crewing with experienced sailors is a great option, but it seems that opportunity and schooling rarely come together.

At what point in a sailor's experience does one decide they're ready to take on risks?

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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