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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > General Discussion (sailing related)
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  #1  
Old 06-27-2007
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Living Aboard question?

Hello all

I am a xsailor right now trying to get back in the water. My Dad was a hard core sailor and forced on to us kids, we crew up on a man made lake it was 300 feet deep. we sailed for 17 years, but 10 of those years I was just a kid. 20 years later this is all I have been thinking about. My Dad sold his boat, we had in Lake Erie it was a 33 foot Abbott.
The boat was very well built, we were in many storms with her! We use to race all the time, my Dad loved to go out in a storm while boats were coming in to get away from it we were headed out!

I was going thru a divorce and could not buy it from him at that time.
now I have 3 years left to pay child support and I will be getting my own soon. this past weekend I sailed on a Corsair 24 and she was nice and fast!

I am now thinking of getting a trimaran. sailing is like ridding a bike to me I cant believe that I did not forget everything, I use the bowling not around my house for things!

Now you probably thing I am a sick person. Its all a dream right now, if you have it take this moment and look at what you have because it is a dream for some people...







Here are a few things I think about, because one day I would love to be on the ocean....


1.where do you live and how did you learn to sail on the ocean isn't it different then the great lakes?

2. Isn't there Pirates out there in the ocean that try to take your boat and stuff how do you know where not to go?

3. how do you learn about the tides, I guess you would learn if you get grounded but thats the hard way?

4. what do you do for money? Do you go to work from your boat?

5. How do you wash your clothes?

I guess that is all i would be worried about?
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  #2  
Old 06-27-2007
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Hmm...

I live just outside of Boston, but keep my boat down on Buzzards Bay, so I have good access to Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, and points south.

I learned to sail on the ocean by sailing on the ocean. The major differences between sailing on Buzzards Bay and on a larger inland lake, like Winnepesaukee, are: 1) Tides, as you don't have tides or tidal currents on a lake; 2) Wind is far more consistent on Buzzards Bay—the wind on inland lakes, harbors or bays tend to be much less consistent, shifting direction much more; 3) Waves tend to be much more dramatic, since the wind often has hundreds of miles to pile up water in to waves.

The Great Lakes have some things that are similar to the ocean, being fresh water inland oceans for the most part themselves.

As for pirates, they tend to concentrate on larger commercial ships and yatchs. If you have a smaller boat, they may not bother you. They're also generally in waters that you won't be sailing anytime soon—the Red Sea, the waters off of northeastern South America, some areas around Indonesia and such. If you stick to the coastal US, Caribbean and Mexican waters, chances are pretty rare that you'll even hear about pirates.

You learn about the tides by reading tide charts and by getting stuck...and learning how to read the charts better...

Work at a job... when I go off cruising, I'll probably work from the boat a bit... as needed.

Currently, I live in a house and have a washer and dryer, but will be getting mostly easy to wash, fast to dry clothes for when I do go cruising. Most marina areas have laundromats or some sort of laundry facilities.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #3  
Old 06-27-2007
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From Lake Erie as a kid to liveaboard!! More power and knowledge to ya! I sail on Lake Erie (western basin, shallow and tempetuous at times. While I've only got a 24' swing keel, the lake can be quite rough. No tidal current but lots of unfriendly waves especially in weather.

I recommend you keep reading the threads on Sailnet and any other source you can find. Living aboard sounds great but anyone thinking of it needs knowledge -- both reading and researching (the web is great -- especially for dreamers like me!) as well as a sturdy boat designed for the expected sailing range -- coastal and bluewater appear to be VERY different animals!

Good luck in your search -- keep learning the ropes!
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Old 06-28-2007
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IMA... Good luck with your dream. I must admit I laughed a bit when I saw your list of questions as some are funny and not worth worrying about...and there are dozens more that you shuld be worried about!
I will attempt some short answers and suggest you just dig back here in the forums as there is lots of detailed advice to others like you. My own advice is to figure out exactly what you want to DO on your boat and let that drive your choice of boat and your learning.

1.where do you live and how did you learn to sail on the ocean isn't it different then the great lakes?
The COASTAL ocean is not much different than lake Erie. You sail on it in good weather first and learn about tides and currents...the as you get your confidence up you go out in heavier weather and finally you start to make some point A to point B passages that test your skills. OFFSHORE passagemaking requires a lot more preparation!

2. Isn't there Pirates out there in the ocean that try to take your boat and stuff how do you know where not to go?
NO there are not Pirates out there. (Except in a couple of places far away from here.) There are petty thieves who will board your boat to steal stuff or try to grab your dinghy but they are few and far between and if you take basic precautions you are generally safer on your boat than you are at the shopping mall.

3. how do you learn about the tides, I guess you would learn if you get grounded but thats the hard way?
Tides range from up to 20 ft in Maine to virtually nothing here on the East Coast. Your GPS will have a tide program in it which tells you the time and height of low and high tide wherever you are. There is also a book by Eldridge which contains tide tables for all over. Here's a free tide table program for your computer that you can download and play with! WXTide32 Download

4. what do you do for money? Do you go to work from your boat?
Unless you have some special skill that can be accomplished from your boat like writing or designing computer programs...you need $$ to go cruising. Alternatively you can get a land job and live on your boat at a dock. But don't plan on CRUISING and making $$...especially outside of the US where outside labor is most often not desired or permitted. SAVE by eliminating EVERY unnecessary expense from your life in pursuit of your dream.

5. How do you wash your clothes?
Laundromats wherver you pull in or nice ladies in the Caribe who will take in washing.

I guess that is all i would be worried about?
HaHa...keep on reading! You haven't even thought about anchors or solar stiks yet!! Whatever you do...don't post your picture on line!!


Welcome the the insane asylum!!
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Old 06-28-2007
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What else should I worry about? What is the thing that you worry about the most while out at sea?
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Old 06-28-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ImASonOfaSailor
What else should I worry about? What is the thing that you worry about the most while out at sea?
Screwing up where people can see?

Seriously, there are things that you need to attend to. Then there are things you can worry about. Generally, you don't worry about things you can change, you just take care of them. Worry is reserved for things you can't control or anticipate, like getting run over by a large ship while you're asleep (assuming single handing) - and even then there are things you can do (e.g., not sleeping in shipping lanes, radar with contact alarms, etc.).

My biggest worries? Illness far from medical attention, striking an invisible object just below the surface (as did Graham Dalton in the Velux 5 Oceans), and overlooking something critical that causes damage to the boat.

I'm sure the more experienced sailors will have a lot more to add.

Cheers,
Phil
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  #7  
Old 06-28-2007
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"I must be crazy to be in a loony bin like this." McMurphy, One flew over the cuckoo's nest
Hey Cam, I wish you were still moderator so we could change the name of "off topics" to "cuckoo's nest".
And now back to our regular programming.
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Old 06-28-2007
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Cam, you're not supposed to warn them about the photos...

As for what to worry about when out at sea... storms, whales, large ships turning you into a bumper sticker... etc.
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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  #9  
Old 06-28-2007
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I worry about whether the sun will ever come out so I can find my position with a sextant! (G)

Inside joke IMA...actually when at sea I typically worry about other ships assuming the weather is decent. When the weather isn't decent you don't have time to worry! On the other hand a guy pulled into our dock yesterday with his wife and 2 daughters and they had lost their rudder on the way to Bermuda in a collision with a whale. Bent the rudderpost so it could not be steered. So maybe I'll worry about that now.
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Old 06-29-2007
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I have yet to make an offshore passage, but I recall a fellow on this forum -- Zanshin, I believe it was -- who lost his rudder as a result of some really aggressive galvanic corrosion. Fortunately he was just a few miles from his marina, but that is something I now think about every time I go sailing. I'm having my boat hauled in a few weeks for bottom paint. Rudder fittings are going to be at the top of the list of things to go over.
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