My Kinda Sail Boat! - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 07-11-2007
USCGRET1990's Avatar
SENIOR CHIEF
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: YORKTOWN, VA
Posts: 1,380
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
USCGRET1990 is on a distinguished road
Thumbs up My Kinda Sail Boat!

Although wood is very high maintenance, if money was no object, I would buy this boat in a heartbeat. Anybody else?
historic Chesapeake Bay schooner 58"
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 07-11-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Money would have to be no object... you'd have to hire a crew just to keep up with the brightwork.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 07-11-2007
USCGRET1990's Avatar
SENIOR CHIEF
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: YORKTOWN, VA
Posts: 1,380
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
USCGRET1990 is on a distinguished road
Oh yea, just what I was thinking. But I'd still rather have the old wood vs. a new "Glass Slipper"..!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 07-11-2007
ccam's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Sonora, Texas
Posts: 162
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
ccam is on a distinguished road
I with you USCGRET- I'd just need a large family to press into crew
__________________
Latitude 27.95 sometimes
______________
s/v Sea Horse
1984 HC 33T #61
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 07-11-2007
Jeff_H's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Annapolis, Md
Posts: 6,541
Thanks: 5
Thanked 85 Times in 65 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about
She's a nice looking Ketch.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 07-11-2007
TrueBlue's Avatar
Señor Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Narragansett Bay
Posts: 4,853
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough
I was going to question the accuracy of the "schooner" description before Jeff beat me to it. Unless this boat has had it's spars modified, it sure looks like a ketch to my non-marine architect eyes.

Isn't a schooner rig characterized by the forward mast being shorter, or of equal height as the aft mast? They're normally gaff-rigged as well.
__________________
True Blue . . .
sold the Nauticat
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 07-11-2007
USCGRET1990's Avatar
SENIOR CHIEF
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: YORKTOWN, VA
Posts: 1,380
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
USCGRET1990 is on a distinguished road
The schooner sail-plan has two or more masts with the forward mast being shorter or the same height as the rear masts. Most traditionally rigged schooners are gaff rigged, sometimes carrying a square topsail on the foremast and occasionally, in addition, a square fore-course (together with the gaff foresail). Schooners carrying square sails are called square-topsail schooners. Modern schooners may be Marconi or Bermuda rigged. In Bermuda, Bermuda rigged schooners had appeared by the early 19th Century. Known as Ballyhoo schooners, or, along with single masted relatives, with Bermuda or gaff rig, with or without a square topsail, as Bermuda sloops. A memorable example to the last type was HMS Pickle. Some schooner yachts are Bermuda rigged on the mainmast and gaff rigged on the foremast. A staysail schooner has no foresail, but instead carries a main staysail between the masts in addition to the fore staysail ahead of the foremast. A staysail or gaff topsail schooner may carry a fisherman (a four sided fore and aft sail) above the main staysail or foresail, or a triangular mule. Multi-masted staysail schooners usually carried a mule above each stay sail except the fore staysail. Gaff-rigged schooners generally carry a triangular fore-and-aft topsail above the gaff sail on the main topmast and sometimes also on the fore topmast (see illustration), called a gaff-topsail schooner. A gaff-rigged schooner that is not set up to carry one or more gaff topsails is sometimes termed a "bare-headed" or "bald-headed" schooner. A schooner with no bowsprit is known as a "knockabout" schooner.

The schooner may be distinguished from the ketch by the placement of the mainsail. On the ketch, the mainsail is flown from the most forward mast; thus it is the main-mast, and the other mast is the mizzen-mast. A two-masted schooner has the mainsail on the aft mast, and therefore the other mast is the fore-mast.

Schooners were more widely used in the United States than in any other country. Two masted schooners were and are most common. They were popular in trades that required speed and windward ability, such as slaving, privateering, blockade running and offshore fishing. They also came to be favoured as pilot vessels, both in the United States and in Northern Europe. In the Chesapeake Bay area several distinctive schooner types evolved, including the Baltimore clipper and the pungy.

There was no set maximum number of masts for a schooner. A small schooner has two or three masts, but they were built with as many as six (e.g. the wooden six-masted Wyoming) or seven masts to carry a larger volume of cargo. The only seven-masted (steel hulled) schooner, the Thomas W. Lawson, was built in 1902, with a length of 395 ft (120 m), the top of the tallest mast being 155 feet above deck, and carrying 25 sails with 43,000 ft² (4,000 m²) of total sail area. A two or three masted schooner is quite maneuverable and can be sailed by a smaller crew than some other sailing vessels. The larger multi-masted schooners were somewhat unmanageable and the rig was largely a cost-cutting measure introduced towards the end of the days of sail.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 07-11-2007
USCGRET1990's Avatar
SENIOR CHIEF
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: YORKTOWN, VA
Posts: 1,380
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
USCGRET1990 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrueBlue
I was going to question the accuracy of the "schooner" description before Jeff beat me to it. Unless this boat has had it's spars modified, it sure looks like a ketch to my non-marine architect eyes.

Isn't a schooner rig characterized by the forward mast being shorter, or of equal height as the aft mast? They're normally gaff-rigged as well.
by jove...I believe you're right...!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 07-11-2007
TrueBlue's Avatar
Señor Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Narragansett Bay
Posts: 4,853
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough
So though this cut and pasted tome from wikipedia, you're agreeing with this notion?
__________________
True Blue . . .
sold the Nauticat
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 07-11-2007
TrueBlue's Avatar
Señor Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Narragansett Bay
Posts: 4,853
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough
Looks like we posted simultaneously. < g >
__________________
True Blue . . .
sold the Nauticat
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
help with lifes dream kimby Boat Review and Purchase Forum 37 12-02-2009 11:32 PM
The Search for the First Boat - long learning curves pmoyer Boat Review and Purchase Forum 45 12-20-2008 01:28 AM
The Basics of Reefing Mark Matthews Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 03-29-2004 07:00 PM
Synchronized Sail Trim Carol Cronin Racing Articles 0 03-16-2002 07:00 PM
Sail Trim Steve Colgate Learning to Sail Articles 0 05-10-2000 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:43 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.