Looking to help crew a long ocean trip. Need Advice. - Page 3 - SailNet Community
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #21 of 33 Old 07-16-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 318
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
There are safe easy ports along the west coast every 100-150 miles, no need for dozens of jerry cans either. People have been trolling salmon this time of year for the last 100 yease in 26 foot wooden trollers. Y'all are trying to make this into an epic voyage, it's a frikkin lake sail. The books back up everything I have said. Me and the books or a bunch of people that have never cruzed the lost coast, your call. Im done here.
wildcard is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 33 Old 07-16-2007
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
Also, Alex's boat is a wee bit bigger than a Catalina 30... and probably much better equipped....

Wildcard-

You might want to do the math... at six knots... it will take at close to 10 hours to reach a port if you're between the two ports and they're only 100 nm apart. That's an awfully long time if a bad storm system pops up... and many of the ports on the west coast are very treacherous if you try entering them in heavy weather.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.

Last edited by sailingdog; 07-16-2007 at 09:54 PM.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #23 of 33 Old 07-16-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 318
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
I FRIKKIN MADE MY LIVING THERE! Storms dont come up much in the summer and when they do they are from the NW. Only West wells present a problem and they pass in a day or two in the worst of conditions.
Im starting to wonder if anyone here ever leaves the dock or just sits at the puter worring about what might happen if they go out?
The only real concern is dying of boordom sitting in fog with no wind.
I dont know a whole lot about sail boats, yet, but I know the Pacific inside and out.
wildcard is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #24 of 33 Old 07-16-2007
moderate?
 
camaraderie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,877
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 16
     
http://www.boatoregon.com/Library/ColumbiaMouth.pdf

Makes a big deal out of exiting the Columbia River and references strong currents in several places:
C. Jetty A, which is southeast of Cape
Disappointment, presents a particularly strong
danger when the current is ebbing. Water
flowing out of the river is deflected by the
jetty, and frequently the current reaches eight
knots.

A. Chinook Spur and upper, lower, and
middle Sand Island spurs are built on two
rows of staggered pilings. Currents flowing
through these pilings attain a velocity of five
knots or more.

So it appears that currents DO exceed 2.5 knots fairly regularly. I've never been there...but I would tend to believe the Oregon State Marine Board.
camaraderie is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #25 of 33 Old 07-16-2007
Junior Member
 
NoDoubt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 16
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
NoDoubt is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #26 of 33 Old 07-16-2007
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
Rather curious as to what your boating experience is along this section of the western coast of the United States.

If it is in powerboats or large commercial ships, then the situation isn't at all the same. Most powerboats and commercial ships can make it back to a port, given the 100-150 nm distance between ports, in half the time of a small sailboat, like the Catalina 30.

Also, curious to how you respond to Cam's post. If the currents are above two or three knots consistently, then a small sailboat is going to have even tougher a time making it into a safe harbor when a storm comes up.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #27 of 33 Old 07-16-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Seaside, Florida
Posts: 3,331
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
   
My C30 has a great big cockpit and companionway just waiting to swallow up a bunch of ocean. I've sailed it long and hard for the last eight months -- why, the sails are just a couple of rags now and the hull is paper thin. There is no way in hell I would take it out on the open ocean with two strangers on a multi-day passage. Wildcard, you's WILD...
sailhog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #28 of 33 Old 07-16-2007
Re Member
 
knotaloud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Seattle
Posts: 153
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildcard
Im starting to wonder if anyone here ever leaves the dock.....I know the Pacific inside and out.
Well then you're the only one. No one knows the real power and unexpected fury of the ocean.

Last edited by knotaloud; 07-16-2007 at 11:25 PM.
knotaloud is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #29 of 33 Old 07-17-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 318
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by camaraderie
http://www.boatoregon.com/Library/ColumbiaMouth.pdf

Makes a big deal out of exiting the Columbia River and references strong currents in several places:
C. Jetty A, which is southeast of Cape
Disappointment, presents a particularly strong
danger when the current is ebbing. Water
flowing out of the river is deflected by the
jetty, and frequently the current reaches eight
knots.

A. Chinook Spur and upper, lower, and
middle Sand Island spurs are built on two
rows of staggered pilings. Currents flowing
through these pilings attain a velocity of five
knots or more.

So it appears that currents DO exceed 2.5 knots fairly regularly. I've never been there...but I would tend to believe the Oregon State Marine Board.
Thats the river bar currents not the ocean current.Like any nasty bar, you go with the tides and dont be stupid. All y'all candyasses just stay in your ponds then and leave the Pacific to me. GezusHfrikkinnchrist. Look at the summer conditions in the west pacific and not pull random clips of idiots sailing in the winter and getting killed. He wants to sail in the summer, THIS IS NOT A PROBLEM!
wildcard is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #30 of 33 Old 07-17-2007
Senior Member
 
Valiente's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
Can he go with you, then? You sound more experienced than his prospective skipper, and probably have a better boat for this passage.
Valiente is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Looking to crew in Florida. Short or long term wolfbadger Crew Wanted/Available 3 08-10-2002 02:58 AM
Open ocean crew position wanted. dld Crew Wanted/Available 0 05-31-2002 10:55 AM
Advice for coastal trip.. Newport to New Jersey Bluesmoods Learning to Sail 10 12-10-2001 06:57 AM
The Crew Members' Manifesto Dan Dickison Her Sailnet Articles 0 07-29-2001 08:00 PM
Southern Ocean Weather for The Race Bill Biewenga Racing Articles 0 01-28-2001 07:00 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome