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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
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  #11  
Old 07-18-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad
Well again, let me tell you from a little hurry cane exp, that mast has SIGNIFICANT Drag. You will be sitting with your rail in the water and the gear singing or howling, depending on your point of view.

My guess is that the wind 50 feet up is considerably stronger than down at sea level... we literally sat with our rail in the water... until the eye passed. Then the other rail...

- CD
Isn't that also from the side of the boat? That's a viscous cycle - you get pushed sideways so the keel forces heeling showing even more of that side, catching more wind, getting pushed harder, heeling further...
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  #12  
Old 07-18-2007
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If you're in an RTS of any kind...regardless of category... all bets are off...and any windage is way too much...
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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  #13  
Old 07-18-2007
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This started with "if you find yourself in an offshore storm serious enough"...

1 - you can't take the rig down on the water safely, let alone in an offshore storm.
2 - you are best running with a little windage (from mast, dodger,etc) unless you have no sea room or the waves are breaking (their tops are falling away from the wind.) If you're too fast for comfort, tow a drogue or tire or warp - watch were you tie it off - huge pressure. I believe in heaving to if you can't run as prior; then you'll need something up there to create the windage that will allow you to lie with your bow off the wind.

Read Larry and Lin Pardy, John R's stuff on Sydney Hobart and Fastnet and C Allard Coles "Heavy Weather Sailing."

I strongly suggest you don't get out into offshore storm conditions with a vessel that needs it's mast taken down - dismasted boats have been holed and sunk by the spar punching through the hull in storm conditions.

Sail safe and be aware of developing weather.
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Old 07-18-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad
Well again, let me tell you from a little hurry cane exp, that mast has SIGNIFICANT Drag. You will be sitting with your rail in the water and the gear singing or howling, depending on your point of view.

My guess is that the wind 50 feet up is considerably stronger than down at sea level... we litterally sat with our rail in the water... until the eye passed. THen the other rail...

- CD

CD, what was this in?
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Old 07-19-2007
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Charlie,

A little long... I will pm you - Catalina 380 for the quick answer.

- CD
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Old 07-19-2007
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My new book released soon. "How to Trim the Mast When the Wind Picks Up" In paperback at better bookstores. Actually SD makes the point about inertia. The mast is of more benefit in slowing the roll than it gives up in weight aloft. Listen to CD as he is a guy that has lived through it. Hope to see his video soon in a theatre near you!
pigslo
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Old 07-19-2007
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I posted this on the hurricane thread too: I DID NOT DO THIS AT SEA! THIS IS FROM THE MARINA. I failed to make that clear and am sorry if anyone missunderstood what I was saying... but it does not change what I am talking about. My point is that the wind SEEMS stronger the higher up, and the mast DOES have a considerable fulcrum effect. You would ride the storm better without the mast.

It also does not change my comments about dropping it at sea. If it is that bad, the sea will drop it for you. You cannot do it. Impossible... at least not in a controlled fashion. As was said earlier, you cannot even drop it in a controlled fashion at the marina on a bright sunny day.

Does that make sense?? I will try and get that video going soon so you guys can understand what I mean about the sea. It will give you a flavor.

- CD
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Old 07-19-2007
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The now-passe idea of a boom gallows has merit here as a place to securely lash a potentially nasty piece of gear if the mainsheet fails. I have the ability to lower the boom down to pilothouse, where I can lash it to the pilothouse rail (I would only strip the boom of its sail were I to be a "sitting duck" in an anchorage, and then I'd probably remove the boom entirely to lash it to the deck).

Anyway, with it lashed down, I lose a bit of resistance and I can then wrap a spare sheet or gaskets around the boom to secure the main under its cover as snugly as possible...but if I need to, I can slice all the gaskets and all the sail cover toggles in seconds and get up some sail.
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Old 07-19-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad View Post
Don't worry.... if the storm is bad enough, it will take the mast down for you. You can just sit back and watch.- CD
Not a funny thought, but it makes me laugh the way you wrote it...LOL, thanks
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