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  #21  
Old 07-23-2007
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My Yale mooring pendants come standard with Dyneema chafe sleeves. I find they don't protect and preserve my pendants like the fire hose does so I slide them down the pendant close to the shackles to prevent any wear below water and use the fire hose above. I cut three two foot lengths of fire hose then cut them up the middle and had them sewed one on top of the other. and had velcro sewn in to wrap them over my pendants. I then tie them on to be sure the velcro does not let go. I've been using this set up for six years and have yet to chafe or even wear the yellow coating off my pendants. Dyneema has carbon fibre and kevlar in it and I can wear the yellow Sea Guard coating off my pendants quite quickly so it tells me it's more abrasive not less on my pendants than my fire hose..
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  #22  
Old 07-24-2007
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Since we have a lot of charter boat sailors here I just want to make mention of moorings in the Caribbean and Baamas.
Don't trust 'em unless you dive on them!!
There are many totally inadequate moorings in harbors being sold to unsuspecting tourists for $20+ bucks a night. No problem in settled weather but if you get a squall you can easily find yourself dragging the cement block or with a broken piece of chain hanging from your bow.
Your anchor is far more reliable.

These comments do NOT apply to the government sponsored and licensed moorings in the BVI's and Grenadines which are quite safe.
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  #23  
Old 07-24-2007
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Halekai-

Dyneema has no carbon fiber or kevlar in it... the dyneema chafe sleeves I'm talking about are three-layers of material thick... the two outer layers are dyneema (which is a UHMW form of Polyethylene IIRC) and the inner-most layer is either nylon or dacron, I don't remember which. These don't cause any "chafe" on the docklines I've been using. The reason for the innermost liner is that dyneema is harder than most other fibers, and more likely to pick at a coating over the pendant line than the smooth interior of the fire hose.
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Originally Posted by halekai36 View Post
My Yale mooring pendants come standard with Dyneema chafe sleeves. I find they don't protect and preserve my pendants like the fire hose does so I slide them down the pendant close to the shackles to prevent any wear below water and use the fire hose above. I cut three two foot lengths of fire hose then cut them up the middle and had them sewed one on top of the other. and had velcro sewn in to wrap them over my pendants. I then tie them on to be sure the velcro does not let go. I've been using this set up for six years and have yet to chafe or even wear the yellow coating off my pendants. Dyneema has carbon fibre and kevlar in it and I can wear the yellow Sea Guard coating off my pendants quite quickly so it tells me it's more abrasive not less on my pendants than my fire hose..
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  #24  
Old 07-24-2007
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Couple of thoughts on chafe.

Mooring for the weekend, while on board, is one thing. Standing on shore watching your prized yacht, with the sixteen coats of imron that you flew Halekai in to buff to perfection, horse around in six footers with 50 knots of wind, is another kettle of fish.

In my opinion, most boat chocks give more to style than function. Those so located can cruise by and observe the constrution of ship or tug-boat chocks to see the difference. Those chocks are defined by the large radius built in to the chock. Chocks for wire rope are usually roller chocks. But, through a closed chock on a ship it is impossible to acheive a lead through the chock that will result in excessive chafe. Note, I said closed chock. Most of our boat chocks are open and, as mentioned, come not with good radii, but fairly sharp edges especially at extreme leads.

I installed two roller chocks, originally intended as stern chocks, in my bows for use at mooring. The rollers are angled to one another, which i dislike, and so this is not my last iteration of the idea. But they offer me much more reduction of potential chafe. We perhaps are more concerned with chafing gear than in eliminating the more serious causes of chafe. From what I can see in the photo of Halekai's boat the chock he's led through would cause a great deal of chafe were the line tending severely downward. I cannot really see well enough to say for sure. With that boat, I'm sure he's on the case and watching quite carefully, needing little from me.

An option, when leaving the boat on the mooring untended, would be to make up wire rope pendants. These would not eliminate the mooring pendant and it's desirable stretch. They could be shackled to the pendant(s) a few feet outside the chock(s) and then shackled on deck to the line(s) securing to the deck cleat(s). Being, say three to six feet in length one could use a substantial cable and eliminate any chafe concerns. Although any deficiencies in chock design would probably be revealed by the wear pattern! I know it would be more monkeying around, but it would provide a greater sense of peace while standing on shore in the above mentioned conditions.

I am also a big believer in 8-strand dacron line, the Yale cordage i believe you are referring to above. Both dacron and 8-strand construction have superior chafe resistence. The difference in strength and stretch between dacron and nylon is not sufficient, in my opinion, to make up for the superior abrasion resistance. And laid lines are clearly inferior in chafe resistance compared to 8-strand. Years ago, I believe Pli-moor made a twelve strand that would be superior yet, but I can find no recent reference to it's use.

One of the advantages to the "stern" chocks I installed is that they are "closed" chocks with the top being gated. In my next efforts, the "gate" atop will be a roller similar to the rollers on the sides of the current chocks. There will probably be four rollers by the time I'm done monkeying around, similar to what you'd see on those wire rope chocks on a ship, or over the stern of a tug. Pretty? Probably not overly. More effective though as the larger radius will be built in.

It's my opinion that most sailboats do not come equipped very well at all for securing alongside, let alone to a mooring. The addition of a few roller fairleads could go a long way towards the proper fairleading of dock lines, also. We go to extreme lengths to get all of our sail leads adjustably perfect and give short shrift to the gear that will be securing the boat while we're gone.

Good post and comments by all.
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Old 07-24-2007
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TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough
High bulwarks present a problem when tying off to a mooring, unless proper chocks and heavy duty cleats are in use.

I usually use our braided docklines for threading through the pennant eye - keeps the sea critters off our deck and is usually easier on the hands for my deck crew to deal with.

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Old 07-24-2007
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TrueBlue, I'm surprised there are no hawseholes in the bulwarks, to allow lines to come straight into the cleats. Or, alternatively, the cleats should be mounted up on Sampson posts so they are above the bulwark height.

That's just plain wrong, your boat is obviously designed to never be tied up!
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Old 07-24-2007
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Caribbean moorings

Quote:
Originally Posted by camaraderie View Post
Since we have a lot of charter boat sailors here I just want to make mention of moorings in the Caribbean and Baamas.
Don't trust 'em unless you dive on them!!
There are many totally inadequate moorings in harbors being sold to unsuspecting tourists for $20+ bucks a night. No problem in settled weather but if you get a squall you can easily find yourself dragging the cement block or with a broken piece of chain hanging from your bow.
Your anchor is far more reliable.

These comments do NOT apply to the government sponsored and licensed moorings in the BVI's and Grenadines which are quite safe.
I'll second that - here on St. Kitts one of the moorings used mostly by powerboats just off one of the beach bars gave out several weeks ago (wasn't even a big storm - just a bit windy) - the owners had a hell of a time getting someone to help rescue their beached boat on a Sunday morning. They ended up getting some guys with a backhoe loader to drive on the beach and help lift it. Quite an entertaining afternoon, especially after a relaxing sail.
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  #28  
Old 07-24-2007
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camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
TB...How in hell does a vertical windlass work like that???

Good lookin' brightwork!!
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  #29  
Old 07-25-2007
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Works incredibly well cam. There were some good reasons why I chose a Lewmar S/L Vertical as a replacement for the old windlass and why it's set up like that.

The old Maxwell was vertical as well, set up the same way with a teak wedge shaped baseblock. The wedge canted the gypsy to align with the anchor roller at the correct angle.

I also needed to orient the windlass athwart ship due to the restricted space between the chain locker hatch and belowdeck bulkhead. That leaves about a 120 degree chain-gypsy wrap, instead of 180 degrees - but this arrangement has never slipped.

The Maxwell deck hole was cut - I needed to enlarge it a bit for the Lewmar though. I like the fact that vertical motors are below deck - protecting them.

The photo is a bit misleading - the seemingly obtuse chain angle between the shank eye and windlass chain gypsy, becomes more direct when the anchor chain rests upon the roller.
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Old 07-25-2007
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Have you ever tried threading docklines or heavy mooring pennants through hawsepipes - especially in heavy weather? I prefer open chocks - just slip the lines over the top - no mess, no fuss. < G >
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
TrueBlue, I'm surprised there are no hawseholes in the bulwarks, to allow lines to come straight into the cleats. Or, alternatively, the cleats should be mounted up on Sampson posts so they are above the bulwark height.

That's just plain wrong, your boat is obviously designed to never be tied up!
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