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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
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View Poll Results: What helps best against SeaSickness?
Zoftran 1 4.76%
Compazine 2 9.52%
Dramamine or Bonine 10 47.62%
Ginger 8 38.10%
Eat before 2 9.52%
Sturgeon 1 4.76%
There is no cure - just barf at the lee side 4 19.05%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 21. You may not vote on this poll

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  #11  
Old 08-05-2007
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I just read about a 27' Albin that sailed from Honolulu to Seattle and the Skipper was seasick for the first 21 days. He lost app. 25 lbs. Total trip took 55 days because they had some rigging issues that prevented them from using a jib. Must have been one loooong trip. Ginger has helped some people on our boat, Scopolamine worked for me once in 20+' seas(charter fishing trip, long story).
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  #12  
Old 08-05-2007
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Originally Posted by jrd22 View Post
I just read about a 27' Albin that sailed from Honolulu to Seattle and the Skipper was seasick for the first 21 days. He lost app. 25 lbs. Total trip took 55 days because they had some rigging issues that prevented them from using a jib.
Seems like a great recipe for weight loss. Jenny Craig can't compete...
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  #13  
Old 08-05-2007
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I agree with Chris completely, cake is really good, especially if you have a whole one to yourself.

Motion sickness is a natural reaction by your body that mostly happens in really healthy people, I've read that people who run and exercise get motion sickness worse than people who don't. Before the time of boats, fast cars, airplanes, etc, the only thing that caused a person to see one thing and feel something different in their inner ear, was when they ate the wrong mushroom or something else wrong. Wanting to get rid of the poison, the body says **WOOF!!!** and tosses it. And of course if that doesn't help then it just keeps trying the same thing, it's only defense. I understand you can stop becoming seasick through a lot of different ways, one is simply to get used to it by putting yourself into situations where you could get motion sickness, another is by smoking, drinking, or doing other things that essentially poison your body and give it the same sensation (remember the first time you smoked you got sick and felt woozy and green ?). And then another way is to take away some of the sensory input that makes your body think something is wrong in the first place - i.e. stop the motion, or stop seeing something different, close your eyes. Or lay down and stare at something that is moving to put yourself into sync with the boat, so your mind realizes you aren't sick, it's the whole boat that is moving. Or take the helm so that you can feel the motion of the boat better and your mind has more of a chance to "understand" what is going on, why the horizon isn't doing what it "should" be doing, and why it feels like your moving in one way when you "should" be moving in another.

But mostly cake is good, Chris is right on the money with that.

Edit, went looking for sources and found this on wikipedia.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
The most common hypothesis for the cause of motion sickness is that it evolved as a defense mechanism against neurotoxins.[4] The area postrema in the brain is responsible for inducing vomiting when poisons are detected, and for resolving conflicts between vision and balance. When feeling motion but not seeing it (for example, in a ship with no windows), the inner ear transmits to the brain that it senses motion, but the eyes tell the brain that everything is still. The area postrema will always believe the inner ear signal over the eyes, as the eyes are more susceptible to trickery (see optical illusion). As a result, the brain will come to the conclusion that one is hallucinating and further conclude that the hallucination is due to poison ingestion. The brain responds by inducing vomiting, to clear the supposed toxin.
Source: Wikipedia

Last edited by wind_magic; 08-05-2007 at 04:04 PM.
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  #14  
Old 08-05-2007
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I voted for Sturgeon because I happen to like big, prehistoric, freshwater fish, but had there been a place in the poll to vote for stugeron, I would have cast my vote there.
We have nearly everything on board, from the electronic wristband that emits a pulsating shock, to the wristbands with a plastic stone in them, to bonine, dramamine, ginger both in snap and beer form, and the scopalomine patches.
Stugeron wins hands down. It works for everybody on board, with no drowsiness (as far as our crew is concerned, but I've heard otherwise from others), and it works even after the initial symptoms of seasickness are exhibited.
The last we knew, it wasn't approved in the US. We've found it in 25 or 75mg pills, and are currently carrying a 500 pack of 25mg pills of cinarrazine (generic), and half of a 25mg is plenty, generally once at the beginning of a passage with no followup medication.
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  #15  
Old 08-05-2007
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Okay, who's joking? A seasickness meds poll without SCOPALAMINE ON IT?

Scope rocks, either the patch or the pill. Yes, it is available in pill form again for years now.

For that matter passive wrist bands or the ReliefBand both also work. Everything works for someone, and doesn't work for someone else. The best thing to do is check with your doctor about the more serious meds, and TRY THEM IN THE COMFORT OF HOME, only one drug per weekend, so if there is any problem it can be dealt with in the comfort of home.

For me, ginger works--some.
The wrist bands work--some.
The Relief Band works pretty well.
And Scope rocks, I may get a little fuzzy with a cotton mouth and need dark glasses, but I won't be seasick.

Compazine has the advantage of being available in suppository form, in case you can't hold aything down. And the Scope pills can be dissolved under the tongue or in the cheek, and absorbed pretty well into the blood.

Cinarrazine is supposed to be great--but for me, it did nothing.

Dramamine apparently comes in two formulas, the original one knocks you out, the "new" one is IIRC the same meclazine that the other drugstore rack products use--which is of some help to a lot of people, but it ain't Scope.

OTOH, the list of contraindications and complications for Scope can be quite serious, I'd never give it to anyone onboard without medical advice, or in an emergency. Some of us sum it up this way: "I may become a psychopathic delusional axe murderer, but at least I won't be seasick, I'm on Scope now."

Never heard anyone object to that announcement, either. Heard 'em bitch a few times when I asked what was for lunch while all the "Real Men" were bright green though>G<
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  #16  
Old 08-06-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Faith of Holland View Post
I voted for Sturgeon because I happen to like big, prehistoric, freshwater fish...
It is actually not entirely freshwater, since most species of it live in salt water but migrate to the freshwater for breeding purposes. However it is a topic for a different discussion...
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  #17  
Old 08-06-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
Okay, who's joking? A seasickness meds poll without SCOPALAMINE ON IT?
As Wikipedia says:
Quote:
Scopolamine, also known as hyoscine, is a tropane alkaloid drug obtained from plants of the family Solanaceae (nightshades), such as henbane or jimson weed (Datura species). It is part of the secondary metabolites of plants.

The drug is highly toxic and has to be used in minute doses. An overdose can cause delirium, delusions, paralysis, stupor and death.
Call me old-fashioned, but given such nice set of side effects, I think I'd better be puking my brains out, than taking it...
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  #18  
Old 08-06-2007
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"A sure cure for seasickness is to sit under a tree." - Spike Milligan (nt)

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