SeaSickness - what helps - SailNet Community
View Poll Results: What helps best against SeaSickness?
Zoftran 1 4.76%
Compazine 2 9.52%
Dramamine or Bonine 10 47.62%
Ginger 8 38.10%
Eat before 2 9.52%
Sturgeon 1 4.76%
There is no cure - just barf at the lee side 4 19.05%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 21. You may not vote on this poll

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post #1 of 18 Old 08-03-2007 Thread Starter
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SeaSickness - what helps

It turns out to be a problem for one special person I know.
I want to summarize info on the subject in the form of the poll. Please vote.
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post #2 of 18 Old 08-03-2007
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My sweetheart is subject to mal du mer. She there fore avoids being below when it is lumpy or if we are heeled. She prefer to lie down in the cockpit way aft. When things are flat she is OK and will prepare meals and so forth.

She's a good sport and doesn't complain and has only given up her lunch once in 8 or 9 years. We don't use meds or bands etc.

Over time she has become more resistant... so this may go away if you stick with it.

I very very very very rarely get seasick.. but I have. It sucks.

jef
sv shiva
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post #3 of 18 Old 08-03-2007
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I am in favor of copious amounts of rum, you still lose your lunch but won't remember.

(This is in no way an endorsement of drinking at the helm, that is wrong and stupid. Please drink below deck)
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post #4 of 18 Old 08-03-2007
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The worst case of seasickness I have ever seen was aboard a 51' catamaran in Bali. The seas were horribly choppy as a storm moved in, and everyone, but the crew and me, were sick. I was totally stoked, as all the delicious apple cake was MINE, all MINE! Ha ha ha... (The cake was sooo good!) It makes me a bad person, but I knew there was not enough cake for everyone... They were all hurling off the side- there I was, sittng on the transom, with the tupperware container on my lap, eating the entire cake... Good times... Oh yeah, I saw on MythBusters ginger pills work the best. I did not have any (this was before I saw it on TV and would've held that damn cake ransom at that point- did I mention it was good cake?)

Chris
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post #5 of 18 Old 08-03-2007
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I agree about ginger - either in the form of Chinese ginger candy (it will curl your hair but seems to work) or very strong ginger beer (not ginger ale)
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post #6 of 18 Old 08-03-2007
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The Jamaican ginger beer seems to work for people.... No cake for me!

Chris
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post #7 of 18 Old 08-03-2007
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I've never been sick, but I've taken Dramamine as a precaution many times, so maybe it works, maybe I'm just lucky. Cake is good.
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post #8 of 18 Old 08-03-2007
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I keep ginger snaps, ginger ale and ginger candy/gum on my boat as remedy. Eating certain foods before sailing helps some people, and finally, the ultimate weapon is Zofran, which is one of the strongest anti-naseau medications I've ever heard of. Zofran is often used by chemo patients, as I know from my experience with my late wife's battle, and it is amazing. It also has very few side-effects, and is safe enough that it is often prescribed to pregnant women to deal with extreme cases of morning sickness.

Fortunately, I rarely get seasick...

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #9 of 18 Old 08-04-2007
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Just Depends

Unfortunately(as we all know), the prevention & treatments vary so much depending on susceptibility.
For chronic sufferers.....strong medication (many RX) is often the only option.

For me, I'm OK (coastal & off shore) as long as I take care of the basics #1 = sleep especially flying in for charters, proper hydration & nutrition, minimal alcohol & eliminating any anxiety (ie; preparation, crew strength). I wear the wrist bands (superstition & psychological....but I do believe ) and eating/hydrating lightly/regularly (prepared in advance) while underway. I avoid being down below especially in really rough stuff for any period of time unless sleeping.

I have used ginger snaps & ginger ale in the past...they help a little. I tested ginger chunks on a trip in May and thought they were great for anything from indigestion to that "initial feeling". The good news is that the longer the sail trip.....the thought fades from my mind until I wobble when walking on the 1st dock .
I like ginger so much now (need 12 step) on land I have tried various brands & styles.........some are sweeter (added sugar) to hotter/stronger which are my favorites.

A few recent articles:
Blue Water Sailing 8/07 - pg 19...they name histamines in the blood as a culprit
Blue Water Sailing 6/06 - pg 62
Sail - 5/05 - pg 36
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post #10 of 18 Old 08-05-2007
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I can say I do get sick about every time we set off on a decent voyage normaly due to the stress and preperation as i can t sleep the first 24hrs sickness varies from, that feeling, to full blown blowing chunks. But I have always held my watches which makes me think alot of the severity is in the mind, drink plenty of water so you have some thing tastless to bring up. when off watch lay down drink cordial (the sugar one not diet) and eat a small amont of chocolate. this time of the next when you wake up all will be good. I dont think anyone has died from sea sickness.

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I love my boat
S/V GOODONYA
Brisbane
present location Safe at the GOLD COAST.

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DELIVERY SKIPPER
Drinking Rum before 10am makes you a Pirate NOT an alcohlic
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