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  #11  
Old 08-10-2007
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Denise,

This seems more due to a lack of experience and using improper techniques than anything that would be prevented by altering the rigging. Your son may benefit from sailing with an experienced crew or taking formal lessons. He may also benefit from appreciating the cost of the poor decisions he made to take the boat out on his own (in heavy air?) and then hacking up several hundred dollars worth of sheets when it wasn't neccessary.

If my son (or daughter) did this, my first reaction would be to tell them how happy I am that they weren't hurt. Then I would tell them that if they ever want to take the boat out again they have to pay for the damage they did. After they paid me, I'd offer to use the money to pay for lessons to help make them a better sailor.

Last edited by CapnHand; 08-10-2007 at 11:41 AM.
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  #12  
Old 08-10-2007
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Wow.. thanks for all the input!
Yes it's a Oday 30, 1982 fin keel 4'11" draft. It's even rigged for a spinnaker! Odays' have rather small cockpits. We only have primarys just forward of the wheel which makes it nearly impossible to handle the jibsheets without coming in front of the wheel.
It seems my ideas are right in line with others. Yes the jib blocks are on the tracks and we move them according to the wind and sail shape/size. I was watching a friend on his Hunter 31 and saw that he has his jib sheets run back and then to the winches, so I think I'll try that setup today.

My son actually races on a Catalina 30 quite a bit. but of course they Like to dip the rails with big head sails. Not so easy solo! As he found out!

Fair winds!
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  #13  
Old 08-19-2007
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Update: Last week i ran the jib sheets back to the genny blocks then forward to the winches... made sure the figure8 knots were on the ends. I took her out for a sail .. yes much more manageable. I was able to hall in the jibsheets while still behind the wheel and it was light air so I really didnt' have to do much other then keep one loop around the winches. Only thing.. need to relocate the furling line.. its fouls up on the jibsheet.
thanks all
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  #14  
Old 08-22-2007
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It also helps if you use a larkshead and one big sheet instead of two bowlines or even worse, shackles.
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  #15  
Old 08-22-2007
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IMHO, you should never use shackles on the clew of a headsail. That is just asking for a good concussion.
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  #16  
Old 08-22-2007
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btw, do you have a photo of the 'spinaker blocks'. It may be that they are not what you think they are.

My R24 is rigged with cheek blocks out and aft of the primaries about 2 feet, it is basically required that I run from the jib car blocks to them, then to the winch in order to get the right angle on the winch (95 degrees off axis of winch). The primaries are mounted on the bridge deck along with the traveler and main sheet so singlehanding is almost trivial straddling the tiller everything is right in front of you. I have every intention of using spin blocks on the toe rail (bungie corded to keep them from banging and at the right angle when line is slack) , then running through the fixed cheek blocks just like the genny sheets, then to the winch. Just got my new topping lift line and light air spin sheets so I'm finally good to go on spinaker gear, itching to try em out. I'll try to remember to take pictures and report on what works and doesn't.

Last edited by tenuki; 08-22-2007 at 03:59 AM.
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  #17  
Old 08-24-2007
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One of the first things I learned while singlehanding my first boat ('84 Newport 28 MkII) was to rig a downhaul for the jib - especially important when sailing the 160 genoa alone and the wind piped up. I remember going up to the bow and trying to bring the sail down even with the autopilot and having the sheets flying uncontrollably all over the place. Someone on this forum suggested a downhaul. I rigged it up and the next time out doused the gennie from the comfort and safety of the cockpit...

All you engineers out there might know the answer to this: if you bring the sheets aft of the winches and bring them back using a block, doesn't that somewhat increase your purchase on the line, and wouldn't that in turn make the sheet handling at least slightly easier? Both manually and in the winch?
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Old 08-24-2007
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All you engineers out there might know the answer to this: if you bring the sheets aft of the winches and bring them back using a block, doesn't that somewhat increase your purchase on the line, and wouldn't that in turn make the sheet handling at least slightly easier? Both manually and in the winch

Sure does (for me anyway)
Tiller firmly 'tween the thighs, build up a good head of steam, rock your hips, make your backbone slip and work out... ooops sorry, private moment let one sheet out, the headsail comes across, take up other sheet, go sailin' man!
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Old 08-25-2007
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If the wind is really up I sometimes put a temporary loop in the sheet about 2 feet behind the winch (that distance works on my boat with two turns on the winch - you may need to adjust it).

When the sheet flies the loop stops it at the block on the windward track. It provides enough length for the genny to tack about halfway with the clew on the correct side of the boat.

I take up the turns on the winch and then release the loop before sheeting in the genny properly.

To make the loop you just put a bight into the line and then wrap it like a slip knot. This works with good dacron that is not too worn, but is not great with cotton or hemp.
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Old 08-25-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonfish View Post
All you engineers out there might know the answer to this: if you bring the sheets aft of the winches and bring them back using a block, doesn't that somewhat increase your purchase on the line, and wouldn't that in turn make the sheet handling at least slightly easier? Both manually and in the winch?
Actually, this won't give you any additional purchase, since the blocks are just turning blocks, which don't increase leverage at all. What they do is increase the friction in the system, which appears to give you additional purchase on the line, much like a ratchet block would.

For a block to give additional purchase it must be, or be connected to, a block that is moving. In a block and tackle, like found on many mainsheets, the bottom half of the block is moving with respect to the boom, and if you have three sheaves at the top and three at the bottom, you end up with a 6:1 mechanical advantage.

A simpler example is if you had a flat platform, with a block attached to a post in its center. If you ran a rope from a tree, down to the block and stood on the block, you would have a 2:1 mechanical advantage...since the block is moving relative to the fixed point in the system—where it is tied to the tree. You could lift yourself and the block by pulling up on the rope.

Now, if you added a block to the point where the rope is tied to the tree, and ran the rope from the block on the platform through the block at the tree, you can now lift yourself more easily, since you're pulling down, and can use your body weight to help lift itself, rather than just the muscles when you were pulling up on the rope. However, the mechanical advantage is still only 2:1.

To get a 3:1 advantage, you'd have to tie the rope to the platform, run it up to the block in the tree, and then down to the block on the platform. Again, you'd be pulling up, but it would be at 3:1 rather than 2:1 previously in the original example.

I hope this helps.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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