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  #21  
Old 09-03-2007
Here .. Pull this
 
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Perhaps you could get a bunch of styrofoam from somewhere cheaply and spend an afternoon breaking it into pieces and stuffing it into the hull ????
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  #22  
Old 09-03-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailaway21 View Post
It may be just the ticket for raising the deck alone.(g)
Which might actually be the best thing for all involved.
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  #23  
Old 09-03-2007
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Originally Posted by Sailormann View Post
Perhaps you could get a bunch of styrofoam from somewhere cheaply and spend an afternoon breaking it into pieces and stuffing it into the hull ????
I suspect this method would have many drawbacks, the first being that a manageable chunk of styrofoam might have say, 5 pounds positive flotation. That means at least 750 trips to the bottom, placing the foam and then returning to the surface for more. Not to mention the time involved in cutting up the foam initially and then the inevitable escape of many bits of styrofoam and the neccessary recovery of that foam (everybody involved certainly wanting to be good stewards of the environment and all )
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  #24  
Old 09-03-2007
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sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice
Given DistantStar's previous abandoned boat experiences, he might actually consider applying for federal funds now that he has created an artificial reef. This could turn out to be a money maker, although maybe not sufficiently profitable to restore the 15 homeless boats I believe he has acquired. (g)

Keep pluggin' Star, I've got a feelin' my life is dull compared to your's.
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  #25  
Old 09-04-2007
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An air-tight heavy-duty tarpaulin can be attached to the boat at many different points, creating a parachute. This is filled with air from a scuba tank. It will not get the boat to the surface, but she can then be towed and beached (at High tide). Wait for tide to recede and dry out.
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  #26  
Old 09-04-2007
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My boat was under water the first time I saw it.

I was a part of the salvage team and this is what we tried. (note I said "tried")

Attempt #1: Cheap float bags (water beds)
stuff the bags in the cabin, fill. The result was the bags provide so much lift that they found their way to the companion way hatch and blew out the lip that holds the slide in place.

Attempt #2: Tie plastic drums and fill (55 Gal)
The drums didn't want to stay down and there is no tie point on the round drum.

Attempt #3: leave lid off drum, poke hole in lip.
Worked much better, no lid means that swimming it down there was no issue, a bowline through the hole in the lip of the barrel to a strong point on the boat. Repeat for each stanchion, cleat and chainplate. Fill a little air from the scuba tank to keep it upright. Then someone passes down the compressor hose and you start filing. This still didn't break the suction.

Resolution: At low tide, Tie many lines from the docks around the boat down to the strongest points on the hull. (A sling under would be great but the whole keel was sunk in the muck). Let the tide come up. Here is the key point>>> at high tide, tie the boat to the pilings and let the tide drop. Now the barrels can help out and your good to go. Pump out the cabin really quick and up she floats.

Now this is assuming that you are a: near docks. and b: in Maine where we have 12' tides.

See my site for some of the salvage pics if you want.
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  #27  
Old 09-04-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deniseO30 View Post
to figure out how much floatation (for example)a barrel would have.. is it something like the gallons it holds? The weight of a gal of water is about 9 lbs. so a 30 gal barrel would displace 30 gals of water X 9? = 270 lbs? I'm sure I'm wrong but it seems logical enough. ...
That's pretty much exactly it, you're not wrong at all. The bouyancy of a given volume is exactly equal to the volume of water it displaces. The volume measurement can be taken in any convenient unit of measure, be it gallons, liters, cubic feet, or steres (cubic meters). It all depends on what's convenient. If you had a 55 gallon drum, and assumed 8.5 pounds per gallon (actually it's closer to 8.3, but 8.5 makes the math easier) then you'd be pretty much right on the money at 467.5 pounds of displacement. That is, an empty 55 gallon drum will displace about 460 pounds less the weight of the drum itself and even the polyethylene drums weigh 10 pounds or so. It would be safe to assume you get approximately 450 pounds of displacement per drum. So, theoretically, to lift a 3500 pound boat you'd need 8 drums. Of course, as previous posters indicate, finding attachments and restraints for 3500 pounds of displacement isn't always easy.
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  #28  
Old 09-04-2007
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The van we moved was 21 feet deep on the sand putting the top at about 14 feet. We filled our inner tubes using 200 feet of hose run to a compressor on shore. Even though we floated the roof of the van to the surface none of the tubes popped, probably because the tubes themselves only rose about 14 feet and we hadn’t fill them completely to begin with. We had to use rope tying the tubes together so they didn't escape through the front window and back where the doors were no longer there. I would think a boat might be easier since you only have the companionway opening to deal with. I have 32 years of diving experience in all types of situations. Black water, caves, wrecks, etc. but even still, if it were me I’d hire it out. Even if the boat isn’t worth a large amount you’re stuck at this point. It is easy to get hurt or dead on something that appears to be so simple.

Our little prank took all day to pull off. It would have been much easier if the previous owner had left the keys in it.
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  #29  
Old 09-04-2007
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The hull to deck joint was fibreglassed over by one of the boats last owners. The only opening in the boat is the companion way, so i was thinking put some of the tubes in the v-berth where they wouldnt fit through the door.

As for my many boats, ive really only got this one and my Pearson. Ive given away and given up on the others that i had or was trying to get. The Kittiwake 23 got smashed to bits by a larger boat.

I cant really leave the boat where it is since its right next to a mooring. I guess if it comes down to it, i can abandon it where it is and cut the rig down. I dont really have any money into it yet other than almost a year of keeping up with it.

Oh yea, forgot about the O'Day 27 we just pulled out the marsh.
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  #30  
Old 09-04-2007
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Don’t cut! Have your diver buddies disassemble the rigging and any other parts and put them on the net for sale. Masts are hard to come by these days – at a reasonable price anyway. I could have used one that size for an old ocean racer I had awhile back.
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