Definition of Coastal Cruising vs Blue Water - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 09-21-2007
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 31
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
toben is on a distinguished road
Definition of Coastal Cruising vs Blue Water

Most of the true blue water boats are out of my price range. I'm not really interested in sailing across the Atlantic or Pacific anyways.

What I am interested in is sailing down to the Florida Keys, out to the Bahamas, Jamaica, Puerto Rico and back.

Is this close enough to the coastal cruising definition safety wise?

I'm looking at older boats size 27-30 range. Maybe a hunter, Catalina or Macgregor.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 09-21-2007
Freesail99's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,507
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Freesail99 will become famous soon enough
Send a message via Yahoo to Freesail99
I know it doesn't sound like much. But there is a big difference between a 27 foot boat and a 30 footer. Go with the 30 footer. All the boats you mentioned in fair weather always with an eye to the weather are ( I think ) up to the Tass.
__________________
S/V Scheherazade
-----------------------
I had a dream, I was sailing, I was happy, I was even smiling. Then I looked down and saw that I was on a multi-hull and woke up suddenly in a cold sweat.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 09-21-2007
Melrna's Avatar
Crazy Woman Boat Driver
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: New Bern NC
Posts: 783
Thanks: 16
Thanked 13 Times in 10 Posts
Rep Power: 11
Melrna will become famous soon enough
Send a message via AIM to Melrna Send a message via Yahoo to Melrna
Some of those are serious crossing like crossing the Gulf stream a few times or a night or two out at sea. Even in decent conditions the motion of the boat will be important especially if it is a small one like you are talking about. Unless you and your crew can handle the hobby horse motion for hours on end you will end up not liking it or be beat up by the time you get there. One can sail any boat to any destination if crew is competent, the weather good and the boat outfit right.
I would look at other boats and not the ones you listed like an Island Packet, Cape Dory, Bristol Channel, Westsail, or maybe Pacific Seacraft Orion
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 09-21-2007
JohnRPollard's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Chesapeake
Posts: 5,680
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 10
JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough
Toben,

You said: "What I am interested in is sailing down to the Florida Keys, out to the Bahamas, Jamaica, Puerto Rico and back."

I was with you up to the Bahamas. But once you start making passages through the Carribean to places like Jamaica and Puerto Rico, you are no longer talking about "coastal sailing". That is big water out there.

Melrna is right, people have made similar trips with the kinds/size of boats you are looking at, but that doesn't mean you should. If you were just going down the east coast to the bahamas and back, I'd be less apprehensive. But if you're set on roaming farther afield, Melrna's short list is a good place to start. Is price more important to you than size? If so, you might also take a look at the Pacific Seacraft 25. That's a blue-water capable boat in the same price range as you seem to be in.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 09-21-2007
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 31
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
toben is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnRPollard View Post
Toben,

I was with you up to the Bahamas. But once you start making passages through the Carribean to places like Jamaica and Puerto Rico, you are no longer talking about "coastal sailing". That is big water out there.
Thats what I needed to know.

I can live with only going to the Florida Keys and the Bahamas.

I especially don't want to scare my wife to death.

When I am old and rich I will buy a bigger boat to sail around the world.

Legalities aside, what is sailing to Cuba like?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 09-21-2007
USCGRET1990's Avatar
SENIOR CHIEF
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: YORKTOWN, VA
Posts: 1,380
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
USCGRET1990 is on a distinguished road
Unless you plan to sail in a lake other than the Great Lakes, you will be better off with a "Deep Water" cruiser. Just offshore is as dangerous as out of site of land, believe me...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 09-21-2007
camaraderie's Avatar
moderate?
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,877
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 15
camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
Actually...you can get all the way down to PR simply by waiting for weather an making day hops...nothing over 24 hours is necessary. Nevertheless it does get rougher past the Turks and Caicos and you will be bashing into trade winds and seas. You need a decent sized boat for that and a VERY reliable inbard engine cause you ain't gonna sail it. I'd prefer to see you in something a bit larger or more robust than a small Hunter or Cat for that portion of your trip. But if you limit your trip to US Coast and Bahamas down to the T&C's you can do it in the boats you mentioned.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 09-21-2007
USCGRET1990's Avatar
SENIOR CHIEF
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: YORKTOWN, VA
Posts: 1,380
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
USCGRET1990 is on a distinguished road
It could be done in a 16' boat...just depends on how big your nads are...etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 09-21-2007
JohnRPollard's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Chesapeake
Posts: 5,680
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 10
JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough
I was trying to think of comparable priced boats that are designed for blue water. So that says to me the boat would have to be smaller and older. At the Pacific Seacraft rendezvous last summer, we had a couple in attendance that had cruised aboard their PSC 25 (Mark II) for several years, from the US down into the Carribean, to Venezuela and back. That's a boat you can pick up for $15-20K (sometimes less), often with a trailer. It has an inboard diesel. Small, but stout. Flicka is another possibility.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 03-04-2008
CaptKermie's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Greater Vancouver B.C. Canada
Posts: 433
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 9
CaptKermie is on a distinguished road
Toben:
Like Comradiere said if you limit yourself you can make do with the boats you listed. And if you don't want to scare your wife to death, stick with closer destinations for the first few years. The boats you mentioned are easy to buy and easy to sell, get one and discover for yourself what your comfort zone is then decide from there if a bigger boat with bigger water is in your future.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bluewater defined? dch Learning to Sail 44 07-29-2009 08:20 PM
Retirement Cruising Budgets Randy Harman Cruising Articles 0 05-12-2004 09:00 PM
Basic Thoughts on Tides Jim Sexton Learning to Sail Articles 0 11-17-2003 08:00 PM
Best Keel for Coastal and Blue Water Cruising halsmithjr Boat Review and Purchase Forum 24 04-10-2001 10:03 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:59 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.