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  #41  
Old 11-06-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SEMIJim View Post
That is so incredibly sad .

And this is in Canada, which, by all accounts, is less a social wasteland than the U.S.A.
It's not sad for us. The general shallowness and (in our opinion) missed opportunities and wrongheaded priorities of our society in regards to youth have given our lives great focus and purpose. We want to avail ourselves of the opportunity to travel while our child is still a child, for him, and for us. Normally, like most people, we would have waited until retirement to mess about in boats. But by having a concrete goal, we can see every day a measure of progress toward achieving it.

As for Canada, the accounts are correct. It is less of a social wasteland (from what I've seen of the States) due to a smaller range of economic classes (there is less mega-wealth and less crushing poverty in Canada) and to certain structural differences in education and health care. But we live in a large city (even by American standards), and it's a wealthy one in many ways. We are subject to the same consumerist messages here, but at a greater intensity due to the concentration of media. Even restricting my child's television to public/educational TV received via antenna (no cable here!), he has had quite a bit of "manufacted desire" via other media, other kids weaned on the tit of cable TV and marketing aimed at children, and the simple osmosis of being a kid in the message-heavy, content-light 21 century.

Yeah, we need to get out.
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  #42  
Old 11-06-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Valiente View Post
It's not sad for us.
No, but it is a sad commentary on the state of society.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Valiente View Post
Yeah, we need to get out.
Yeah, before something like this happens to your kid: Student Gets Detention for Hugging

Jim
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  #43  
Old 11-06-2007
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Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice
The more I read, the more I see why I love the poor little small insignificant ugly country, the joke of many here, the poor economy like Luisiana State country where I hail from.....yes I do....
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  #44  
Old 11-06-2007
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While I do agree with the main thread here, I must stand up for my children-they fuss at me to take them out to do things. We go canoeing, camping, sailing, hunting, target shooting, and sometimes we just ride around in the Blue Ridge Mountains in my truck talking. When I get home from work I actively engage them in conversations about their day, the news, plans, etc., and sometimes they even answer me. My oldest boy needs to be knocked in the head with a hammer, but my youngest is all for anything we can do outside, and turning into a pretty damned good sailor with only one season behind him. Nothing against other parents, but if you put in the effort and time, the rewards are priceless. I have 2 sons who are growing into good men who will stand the course for kith, kin, and country. Am I bregging? Yes. Am I proud of myself? No, as I've let too many things get by me. Am I proud of them? You bet your ass I am! My kids are my reward for getting my act together. The best part is that they keep me active (and in pain) when all I want to do is turn on the TV and the computer and call it a day, playing the part of the tired old man.

Nebo
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  #45  
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My last post was made after reading only a few of the posts, and I really feel a need to add to it.

The death of the American culture was spawned by two actions:
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  #46  
Old 11-06-2007
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Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice
Nebo

good poster, and good father..be patient..one day when you start xxxyour pants and trembling from parkinson, they will appreciate what you did for them.....
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  #47  
Old 11-07-2007
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More long rantings

Okay, so kids have a tough entree to sailing in many areas. My cousin's younger son, who get precious little attention, showed an avid interest in sailing this past summer. We're talking about a place with multiple lakes and immediate family owning multiple cottages on them; it's where I learned to sail. In my youth, there was always a boat to borrow, and other kids to sail with. Brian couldn't get a ride. His uncle's 17' daysailor (which I crewed on many a happy day) sits rotting in the weeds in a nearby field; Brian got yelled at for trying to clean the leaves out of it and make it sailable. Not his. Too dangerous. Yadda yadda.

I was nearly pissed off enough to drop work and fly 2000 miles & drag his ass out on any boat we could steal. The kid is showing an interest -- won't anybody help that along?

Do you think, too, that sailing is its own worst enemy sometimes? It has, and seems to enjoy, a reputation as a sport of Bluebloods. Perhaps deservedly so -- read the names at the US Nationals: Haddington-Smythe; Braithwhite; Darlington. And so on, all veddy upper crust. It's exactly like classical music or opera. Sailing craves to maintain its elevated status and cultural exclusivity -- then wonders why everyone at the show is a rich white person over seventy. You can have a precious plaything, a bonbon for wealthy retirees ... or you can have a robust sport that belongs to everyone.

It's a perception not helped by big-money ocean racing, such as its most visible spectacle, the America's Cup. Seems like a bunch a rich assholes with too much money -- and too many lawyers -- at their disposal. If they'd quit their aristocratic pissing contests and sail like funhogs, the sport would benefit thereby. (That's why I love the Aussie 18ers; never let money get in the way of raw sensation. Sail like it hurts not to!) If I were Sir Guy of The Magic Christian, I'd sponsor a boat good enuf to win the AC. The day after the race, we'd announce the rules for the next challenge series: Stock Catalina 22s, Dacron sails only, maximum spending limit of $40,000, see you in one year. Let's go sailing.

Maybe then it would become cool to kids and blue-collar citizens. I hang out on the TrailerSailor board and lurk at SailingAnarchy -- which feature more frugal and younger demographics, respectively. So let it be known! There are young, athletic people who love to go fast and don't give a rat's sphincter about 'cult-cha and breeding, dahling.' And there's a gang of vaguely overweight, sunburned rednecks who fell into some crazy love affair with a debutante named Sailing, and they're going to Bondo their old boats and scrounge hardware and putter around their little lakes or weedy bayous in whatever ancient wreck they can afford. Because they are in love. And love is blind.

It's hard to argue sailing is too expensive: I'm poor, but I got two perfectly fabulous sailboats. People are dropping thousands on lift tickets, Harleys, Jet Skis and snowmobiles. They can afford $400 for a used Sunfish, or $2350 for a San Juan 21. The world is full of used sailboats. Money isn't keeping people from sailing. The perception that it's expensive might be.

This is an important and energizing topic. Thanks, Sailhog.
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  #48  
Old 11-07-2007
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Well said bob.. Are you a member of the RYC???
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #49  
Old 11-07-2007
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We seem to have two separate, and equally important discussions going on here.

1} The decline and fall of Western Civilization

2} The hows and whys of expanding a love of sailing into the youth of today.

The first probably deserves it's own thread.

The second probably deserves it's own forum! As a community, we really should take responsibility for the promotion of sailing for sailing's sake. The question is, what can one person do?

Like so many of you have suggested in this thread; we can start with one or two yung'uns. Our own or someone else's; depending upon our circumstances. On this count I really have to take my hat off to Giu!, a fine job he is doing.

But beyond that, what group efforts can be achieved? I'm not offering all of the answers; but I'm hoping to clarify the question.

There have been many astute observations; Bob, Val, Nebo, etc.

Just a few thoughts,
Fred
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  #50  
Old 11-07-2007
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Owning a boat could be a lot less expensive if you could magically get rid of all of the boats that are just rotting away in slips and taking up valuable space. On HHI at least, a good number of these boats have been abandoned and are now for sale by the marina and dock owners who hope to recoup some of their lost slip rent. Unfortunately a boat isn't like, say, an automobile which is routinely stripped of its useful parts and actually SOLD as scrap at the end of its service life. A boat actually costs a great deal of money to dispose of. A friend of mine recently "bought" a J boat for its mast and boom. In exchange for the spars, he agreed to chainsaw it into disposable pieces. It took nearly a full day of incredibly hard work.
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