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  #31  
Old 07-02-2006
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. By the 1980''s resins improved, as did fiberglass material handling techniques and rigging design and strength of materials. The blister problem was better understood and higher tech resins and fibers entered the industry.

http://yachtpuff.com/pages/14/index.htm
An 80's era boat with a horrid case of the blisters. So much for "improved" materials and handling.
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  #32  
Old 07-02-2006
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Boats are now days a commercial product. They're designed to sell to the largest market and I think the design changes over time go hand in hand with construction methods. Now days the market is going for space, comfort, and to a lesser extent, speed. The seaworthy designs of the past are out of style and the wide, light and complicated are in. There's pluses and minus' to this. Cruising appeals to more people now but finding what some would call a "real,seaworthy" boat is getting difficult. I think the real loss in the high-tech construction and design is the fact that there's so redundancy. There's no room for error. Take the Mumm 36 or any other high tech racing sled. Aspects of them are stronger than anything we've seen. But if something happens that wasn't planned on or calculated in the design phase, then they're so fragile.
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  #33  
Old 08-06-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newport41 View Post
Boats are now days a commercial product. They're designed to sell to the largest market and I think the design changes over time go hand in hand with construction methods. Now days the market is going for space, comfort, and to a lesser extent, speed. The seaworthy designs of the past are out of style and the wide, light and complicated are in. There's pluses and minus' to this. Cruising appeals to more people now but finding what some would call a "real,seaworthy" boat is getting difficult. I think the real loss in the high-tech construction and design is the fact that there's so redundancy. There's no room for error. Take the Mumm 36 or any other high tech racing sled. Aspects of them are stronger than anything we've seen. But if something happens that wasn't planned on or calculated in the design phase, then they're so fragile.
I could not agree more. There is no room for errors when sailors lives are on the line. The failure patterns in epoxy vs polyester are very different indeed. As the life-cycle of a boat goes from being a polyester hull with AL stick to an epoxy hull with epoxy stick all of a sudden the designer could place the centerline of the hull below the waterline as the weakest part of the system. Think I am exaggerating? Read on...If you look at the materials and the way the shop floor has to handle them during the layup you will see that the market and certain designers are about to or may have already set themselves up for a major fall.

Just last year a 2005 Tartan 3700 hull split clean open 30 inches under the forward bulkhead some distance from the mast step. The incident involved a delivery from NJ to MD. The hull split allowing water in up to 3' above the cabin sole. The USCG came to the rescue and thankfully no lives where lost at sea. The boat was then whisked away from a yard in the NE and repaired.

The owner was quickly blamed for over tensioning the rig. No notice was ever supplied, or has been supplied to owners on rig tension, or hull inspection procedures. It is a shocking way for a manufacturer to allegedly conceal relevant safety data from the market.

Do a Google search for 'split hull Tartan 3700' and see what you come up with
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  #34  
Old 08-06-2007
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Jim-

There's actually a thread on this issue, which was started a day or two ago by Camarderie IIRC.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #35  
Old 08-06-2007
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Original thread...2002...last post 2006...welcome Jim but be aware of the dates and if you would like to start up an old thread again that is fine...just acknowledge the fact to save the rest of us from reading a lot of old stuff again! Thanks.
As an aside I posted some links to the Tartan problem you cite and others under Buying a Boat last night! Small world!!
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  #36  
Old 08-06-2007
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It was your thread from last night that I was referring to.
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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  #37  
Old 08-06-2007
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I like Hi tech...but old thread suck
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  #38  
Old 08-07-2007
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Dawg...your post was being composed at the same moment as mine.

I like older designs with new materials...except foam cores in hulls!!
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  #39  
Old 08-07-2007
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Yeah, those Divinylcell foam-cored, carbon fiber and kevlar boats are really pure junk.
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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