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  #1  
Old 11-26-2007
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This is so tragic

We went out for a sail yesterday and while on the VHF I heard the same pan pan again from the coast guard. apparently the takarora II is still missing, overdue from hawaii for well over a month now.

a lot of things can delay a sailboat crossing that distance, but at this point looks like there's not much hope. mariners are asked to keep a radio watch out for her, but they've been asking that since early october i think.

can you imagine what it must be like to be on shore waiting for the return of the loved one(s) who never returns, no story, nothing, they just don't arrive.

was it a storm? were they cut down? on another thread there is talk about the importance of keeping watch 24/7 - can that relate to what has happened here? i doubt we'll ever know.

i really wonder how often this happens - a crew/person sets off for a wonderful sail offshore, and are never seen again. i've known people who have made that trip; this boat of mine has done it. the takarora II tried, and by all evidence, didn't make it. why?
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  #2  
Old 11-26-2007
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Do you know what kind of boat the Takarora II is??
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #3  
Old 11-26-2007
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A Tale As Old As Man ...



My heart goes out to the families, may it be the last; as forlorn a wish as that may be......
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I got an Old Fat Boat
She's Slow But Handsome
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I Love Her Well, And She Must Love Me
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Old 11-26-2007
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Valiente has a spectacular aura about Valiente has a spectacular aura about
i really wonder how often this happens - a crew/person sets off for a wonderful sail offshore, and are never seen again. i've known people who have made that trip; this boat of mine has done it. the takarora II tried, and by all evidence, didn't make it. why?

No EPIRB, no clue, although it's possible the EPIRB malfunctioned if they had one.

I recall seeing one picture and hearing more than one story of supertankers and freighters coming into port with pieces of sailboat debris jammed onto their bow bulbs.

I think what has to be acknowledged is that while you can contest to a point with a storm, you must consider all merchant traffic oblivious until proven otherwise, and even if they see you, if you are too close they will be unable to change the outcome.

This is why watch-keeping remains so important. A seamanlike pair of adults on passage would normally only see each other at watch change (unless they happened to be awake at the same time), because there is never a time that someone shouldn't be on watch. This doesn't mean lashing oneself to the wheel, but it does involve an awareness of height of eye, visual distance to the horizon, the time in which a ship could close with yours assuming it appeared the moment you put down the binoculars, and so forth. Add "night", "shipping lanes", "rain" and "fog" to the mix to determine your personal level of vigilence. I keep a log on the Great Lakes, even for my stupid little day sails, but that is a conscious preparation for what is to come. Not many people keep to this practice, but the few that do tend to exhibit the whole package of "keeping an eye out for trouble". More than one boat around here has been

The various bits of cool technology (radar reflectors, VHF dual watch, AIS, radar) should always be considered mere extensions to the senses, because they can fail, and, unlike humans, don't have a vested interest in avoiding being killed.

But it is also possible that the boat is fine, and will be found empty or with bodies aboard. Foul play might have occurred, or they might have been poisoned by something they ate, overcome with CO poisoning or some other nasty but explicable fate. "Captain's privilege", anyone? Not lashed on? No PFDs on deck?

A container strike or a whale strike could have taken them down in seconds, and would be hard to avoid even with fastidious watch keeping. Again, normally an EPIRB would have been activated, but that wouldn't have helped had they been at the mid-point, beyond the reach of most SAR resources.

All these things taken into account, and I still believe that the miles travelled by recreational boaters are safer per capita than the miles travelled by car drivers, and we don't think twice about getting into a car, do we?

Last edited by Valiente; 11-26-2007 at 02:31 PM.
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  #5  
Old 11-26-2007
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Actually, it depends on the EPIRB... if the EPIRB had a hydrostatic release mounting system, but couldn't float free to the surface, it wouldn't matter whether it was floating or not..since the transmitter has to be on the surface for it to work properly..
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Telstar 28
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Old 11-26-2007
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I can easily see that happening in a catastrophic sinking; like being mowed down.

Just too many possible variables to do anything more than speculate on the 1000+1 things ................
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I got an Old Fat Boat
She's Slow But Handsome
Hard In The Chine, but Soft In The Transom
I Love Her Well, And She Must Love Me
But I think It's Only For My Money
.
..... Gordon Bok
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Old 11-26-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Do you know what kind of boat the Takarora II is??
SD: Here's what was posted by the International Boat Watch Network about the Takarora II...

"The vessel is a 30 ft Tahitian Ketch with a white wooden hull, and
tan sails. It has a 10 HP diesel engine; the name of the vessel is TAKAROA
II. There are two people on this vessel; the owner/operator is Chris
Malchow, a Canadian citizen, and his passenger is Courtenay Steele, also a
Canadian citizen. The vessel has a 406 EPIRB and a handheld VHF radio, but
unfortunately no HF radio.
The TAKAROA departed Hilo, HI on September 8th en route Victoria B.C
and was due to arrive on October 16th. They were not set up on a
communications schedule."
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  #8  
Old 11-26-2007
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Ouch... six weeks overdue without any word from them... not promising news.
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #9  
Old 11-26-2007
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i suppose that it becomes a reality check, at least for me. face it, how often do we see someone die? death is mysterious, and in my experience, usually just "bad news" of the personal or public kind. our entertainment is fixated on death these days, as is the related genre of news media. we are surrounded by death, we cannot go for more than a few hours without vicariously witnessing a real or fictitious death(s).

when death arrives in a manner not so fictitious nor vicarious, it is always a shock to me. now i didn't know these people, but the whole thing about danger at sea is an abstract concept. I've been scared before, and I do all that i can to be safe, but i really don't expect to die when i go sailing. nor do i expect to die when i finally make it offshore.

we don't expect to die when we get in the car or board an airplane; we expect to get where we are going. people travel all over the world every day without mishap. going to hawaii is a vacation, right? sailing to hawaii is supposed to be a challenge, like learning to ride a motorcycle or learning to fly; a hurdle yes, but not one that should kill you.

i know this is unrealistic, but death has become so abstract, travel is so ordinary - even banal - that i just don't know what to do with this kind of information. put it in the same place that i put the hundreds of thousands of people killed in iraq? thousands killed in the latest typhoon in bangladesh? one more abstract concept? maybe thats what we have to do in order to sail - make the possibility of death abstract. or maybe we have no idea how dangerous it really is, no real concept. or maybe it's just a fluke that these people may have died, like that couple killed while parked on a ski-hill lineup when a boulder rolled off the hill and landed on their car.

i'll have no idea what it is to die at sea until i find my lungs filling with salt water, so i guess i'll just have to keep pretending, keep it safe and abstract.
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  #10  
Old 11-26-2007
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Im from the big Island, and lived in hilo for many years. Making that voyage has been a dream of mine since I was a little girl. My heart goes out to the familiy/friends of the crew. I can not even begin to imagine what they must be going through. Growing up on that Island you see the weather change so fast, it will be sunny then you turn your back and its dumping rain and flooding the roads. It happens in a matter of min's. There has been a few storys about people never coming home, mostly fishermen. Fishing out of thoughs waters can be scary at times. I would like to point out that storys of dive and surfing related deaths are much more common. You hear of them on a monthly basis, I have lost a few friends myself from diving. I hope that the familiy can take some comfort in the fact that they were living a dream at the time of their disaperance. And that in its self is extrodanary.

Which would be better-
to live a long uneventful life, or a shorter on filled with adventure? I look up to them for living their life to the fullest.
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