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warwicksail 12-18-2007 02:24 PM

Speed
 
Hi guys does anyone know the equation for working out wot power is need to move a certain boat a certain speed ?

warwicksail 12-18-2007 02:27 PM

I know the hull speed is around 6 knots

Cruisingdad 12-18-2007 02:37 PM

Is there an equation for that? I would think it would have too many variables, including: Prop, hull design, how clean the hull is, current, wind, etc.

I have always thought a general rule of thumb is 2 HP for every 1000 lbs. The Catalina 380 weighs about 20k and has a 40hp engine. The 400 weigs about 24000 and has a 54 hp. I would err on the high side.

However, there are so many factors, it would seem impossible to calculate to me. Maybe some naval architects could give you a better rule of thumb than mine.

- CD

Freesail99 12-18-2007 02:41 PM

Ocean Navagator did a story on hull speed and horse power needed in the October 2007 issue.

sailingdog 12-18-2007 02:48 PM

There are way too many variables... engine size, gearing, prop diameter and pitch, hull design, etc. The best resource would be something like Dave Gerr's The Propellor Handbook.

CapnHand 12-18-2007 03:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cruisingdad (Post 238990)
I have always thought a general rule of thumb is 2 HP for every 1000 lbs. The Catalina 380 weighs about 20k and has a 40hp engine. The 400 weigs about 24000 and has a 54 hp. I would err on the high side.

That seems to be about what most boats have, although I would say that 2 Hp for every 1000 lb (4 Hp per ton) is more like the upper limit. Our boat is 9600 lbs and has an 11 Hp diesel (2.3 Hp per ton). That being said, I've never heard anyone complain about being over powered.

Cruisingdad 12-18-2007 03:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CapnHand (Post 239003)
That seems to be about what most boats have, although I would say that 2 Hp for every 1000 lb (4 Hp per ton) is more like the upper limit. Our boat is 9600 lbs and has an 11 Hp diesel (2.3 Hp per ton). That being said, I've never heard anyone complain about being over powered.

I sure would not complain. THere have been many instances where a really strong current can impede if not outright stop your progress.

I have been in many blows WOT where we hardly moved at all with the wind on the nose. Other than weight, the only problem with over powering is the fuel consuption. But I wonder if a overpowered engine would hold up longer???? Not sure.

- CD

TrueBlue 12-18-2007 03:47 PM

Quote:

That seems to be about what most boats have, although I would say that 2 Hp for every 1000 lb (4 Hp per ton) is more like the upper limit.
10 hp/ton would be considered WAY overpowered by that formula. But I have often been assured of a speedy journey during conditions with adverse currents and no wind, with our 90 hp iron genny pushing 18k lbs.

Cruisingdad 12-18-2007 05:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TrueBlue (Post 239011)
10 hp/ton would be considered WAY overpowered by that formula. But I have often been assured of a speedy journey during conditions with adverse currents and no wind, with our 90 hp iron genny pushing 18k lbs.

You are giving Macgregor's a run for their money!!! HAHA!

- CD

sailingdog 12-18-2007 06:34 PM

That's why your boat is considered a motorsailor...not a true sailboat... :)
Quote:

Originally Posted by TrueBlue (Post 239011)
10 hp/ton would be considered WAY overpowered by that formula. But I have often been assured of a speedy journey during conditions with adverse currents and no wind, with our 90 hp iron genny pushing 18k lbs.



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