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Old 01-29-2008
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Trucking the boat

This is for some members that have asked about shipping a boat (via 18 wheeler, obviously).

I will do my best to describe it. I have been involved with three moves now, and done two (one of them very recently on a Tayana 42).

Ok, you have bought your boat. You now want to ship her. It is not as difficult as it might seem - but it can be costly if you are not thoughtful of some details.

First, you need to understand that no matter how well you plan, something will get screwed up. That is just life. The trucker will be late, his truck will break down at the last second and you will have to find another mover (just happened to us), or you run into some snag on the shipment.

Here is what/how I would walk you through the process. First, pick out the yard that you want to do the work for you. The best choice of yards is one that will let you do some/most of the work while on their premices. This is not easy, actually, since many may have insurance restrictions against it. This is important because a lot of the work can be done without paying the rigger(s) at $90/hour/person (with what usually is two people).

Take a picture of ALL of your rigging. Take a picture of your lines and all their runs (all the way up the stick). Take pictures of the runs at the cockpit and mast base. Take pictures of your bimini and dodger and its runs... the davits... spreader and boots... anything and everything. This is very important. You will likely use this info when you go to put it all back together. Also, take pics of your boat BEFORE the work begins at the yard so you have a record of the condition before the work. Also, take a lot of pics of the boat once loaded on the truck (for proof of damage).

Pull everything off the boat you can - esp things that you do not want to pay a rigger for. These include: sails, bimini, davits, dodger, boom and associated rigging, lifelines and stanchions, binnacle (if necc), pulpit and stern rail. You can also begin the process of disconnecting the electronics that run up the stick if yuou have access. The best solution for us was to place these items in drawers. For the larger items or items that could act as a cushion, keep them out of the boat to be packed last (inside the baot).

Once you hit the yard and the rigger steps on, the clock starts. Hopefull your yard will let you assist. I have found being nice and acting knowledgeable (but not bossy) is the key. The rigger will handle most of the de-rigging of the boat and labelling. EVERYTHING should be labelled. I have found in all three instances for me that the riggers brought all of their own supplies, including the packing material (usually carpet), celophane, tags, etc. Just a word of caution: make sure you pull the stays off the mast. Anything touching the mast on the while on the truck will chafe it (and the mast).

For shipment, imagine the truck bumping all over the place. You should pack accordingly. Anything touching wood will scar it. EVERYTHING should be padded and secured in cabinets. Also, drain all the water out of your boat. No reason for it to be in there. If you are going to ship the boat up north in any weather where it could drop below freezing, make sure you thoroughly winterize the boat before shipment with no-toxic antifreeze. VERY IMPORTANT TO DO THIS!! THere will be no water insulation to keep it warm and it will likely reach the temperature outside. Also, you will probably end up turning off the batts so find a place for all your refriderated items (eat them, discard, or give away). HOWEVER, depending on how long the boat will be without power and assuming your refrigeration does not require use the water to diplace the heat, you may consider leaving the fridge on. We did this time - did not time before that.

Long before this process, you should be considering who is going to truck your boat. I have found the best references for this are people... but the yards will usually give you a list of truckers they suggest. Call all of them and have a backup. The trucker we were using blew an engine a few days before he was going to pick us up. THis would have been a nightmare if we had not found another quickly (as the yard will start charging you for dry dock/day). THe amount to ship varies on so many figures, it would be difficult to gerneralize. However, if you are over 12' beam - you will likely need an escort. If you are over 14 1/2 high (this varies by states you will go through) you will likely need another escort. These heights are WITH IT ON THE TRAILER, not your height out of the water. Every state has their own laws and restrictions and the trucker should know them or have access to them quickly (or find another trucker). I would not just choose my trucker based off of price. You need to have a feel for them - as they will be handling your boat. You should also check (not take their word for it) their insurance and bonding. You can call to make sure they are up to date (very important with many truckers). Make sure they cover your boat replacement value - minimum. I have heard that some truckers get this bond (to get the certificate) then cancel it once they have the certificate, so make sure to call to verify. I do not know if this is true. It was not an issue on the truckers I used because they wre recc's by Valiant and the yard... but caution should be used. Remember, pull everything you can off the truck to minimize the height... this can get expensive when you break 13-14 feet.

Escorts are required (with most states). The number of escorts depends on the load (width, height, length, displacement) and the state. In general, you can plan on one escort for everything you go over. Our escort was $1.25/mile. That is per escort, by the way. We only had to get one all the way from Florida to the Texas state line. The trucker is responsible for coordinating all of this and should be included in his price. Ask him up front.

Once the truck arrives, which will take a lot longer than you could drive it because they are restricted on when they can drive, etc), you will be asked to sign for the boat and verify that it was delivered without damage. That is also when you will pay. We did not have anything broken on this trip.. I did on my lat trip but did not knwo it for a couple of days later. Nothing I could do then. Basically, be shocked if something of some sort does not break. Before you sign for the boat, make sure you take a thorough walk-through and take pics for verification for insurance (so that if something happens two days later your insurance company does not blame it on the truck and refuse to pay). The truckers insurance is responsible for your boat while it is on his trailer - not yours. But discuss this with your carrier.

Once you splash the boat, then comes the tedious work of reversing everything you just did. That is when your pictures come in handy. I suggest changing any halyards, electronics, or any wire runs at this point while the stick is on the ground. A lot easier and less expensive now. It helps if you have planned ahead and bought them before the truck arrives.

Here is our bill for moving a Tayana 42 from Florida to Texas. We did a bunch of the work, as the yard let us.

1) Total yard bill for riggers and dropping the mast, wrapping, power washing (which most truckers wil require before you put it on their trailer), and prepping for move: ~$2,800.

2) Toatal cost for trucker, including all the escorts: $6,800.

3) Cost for pulling off truck and all associated re-rigging: Do not have total bill yet. Will guess around $1,500.

That is for 1300 miles. You can generalize your own numbers from there. The only oversize we had was width - at 12'6.

- CD

Couple more points: Make sure you label everything WHERE it came off. A great example is the stanchions. They may all look the same, but there may be small differences in holes, etc where they line up. Label EVERYTHING EXACTLY where it came off. Put it back in exactly the same spot. Also, make sure the riggers tape the threads on your turn buckles before loosening them. This will give you a good starting point for retuning the mast when you restep it.
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Old 01-29-2008
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Another thing I forgot: If you will be shipping out of S Florida, remember it does not freeze down ther eand antifreeze is difficult to come by. I bought mine in Texas and took down there. You will want to do the same of have it shipped to the yard/West Marine of your choice.

- CD

PS Sorry for all the miss-spellings in the above paragraph. I do not have time to go edit all of them.
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Old 01-29-2008
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shipping

I'm not sure of where you got your costs but have had my boat transported three times and must say must have got a real deal, as the costs were no where near yours. Example boat shipped from Dartmouth Nova Scotia to Alaska $7,000.00. Myself for traveling just 500 miles cost was $525.00. Still trying to understand riggers you speak of, don't you take care of your own boat, I wouldn't let anyone touch mine. Also the transport cost from Florida to southern Ontario Canada is just around $5,000.00. There a lot of boats being shipped every year up here. Again maybe I've just been lucky.
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Just for comparison, last year we shipped a 36 ft race boat - 8 ft keel - from RI to Chicago at just under $3000 total including haul, pack and restep mast with doing the rigging ourselves. About an 1100 mile trip.
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Old 01-29-2008
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Artful...you've mentioned a Morgan33 in past posts...so if that was the boat in question....that could explain much of the difference. Aside from the 42 vs. 33 length, the Tayana weighs twice as much and has a 6ft. draft and 12.5' beam vs. your 4' and 11.9'beam. Finally...there have beensome gas/diesel price increases lately so I'm sure costs are up quite a bit from even a year ago.
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How big was your boat? How long ago?

Transport from Fl to Ont was $5000. How much was haulout, unstepping mast, haul in & restep the mast?
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Nice write up CD...been playing with Dad's money huh??? money is no object....OPM (other people's money) ehehehehehehe
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Old 01-29-2008
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Thanks for the write-up CD, it is very informative.

I was very nervous shipping the 33 from Chicago to RI, I went through all the details numerous times, many as you described, and luckily everything went according to plan. Jeff at Dehler North America was a big help in calming me down and helping me sort out the details, as it was my first boat in all, to me it was unthinkable of putting a boat on a truck, I just could not help thinking something would go wrong and I would be seeing pictures of the boat lying on its side on a highway somewhere.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theartfuldodger View Post
I'm not sure of where you got your costs but have had my boat transported three times and must say must have got a real deal, as the costs were no where near yours. Example boat shipped from Dartmouth Nova Scotia to Alaska $7,000.00. Myself for traveling just 500 miles cost was $525.00. Still trying to understand riggers you speak of, don't you take care of your own boat, I wouldn't let anyone touch mine. Also the transport cost from Florida to southern Ontario Canada is just around $5,000.00. There a lot of boats being shipped every year up here. Again maybe I've just been lucky.
The numbers are real and pretty close to exact. They were also about the best deal we could find.

Regarding the riggers, how do you drop a mast that weighs somewhere around 700-800 lbs by yourself? It took nearly ten grown men to lift it off of the saw horses and onto the truck. The yard was very lenient on letting us do the work - but they sure would not go for us handling the crane and the up/down mast that is associated with that. Many of the yards in S Florida will not let you do ANY of it - not even drop a sail on their yard. You pay them for everything.

The next closest trucker we talked to wanted almost 8k to ship. That did include the escorts.

When did you ship? What trucker did you use? What boat was this? How many escorts and where? My V-42 weighed out at 36,500 lbs, 12'6 beam (though it might bave been wider), about 14 tall, over 42 LOA with the mast handing off the trailer about 5 feet.

Are we comparing apples to apples????
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