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  #21  
Old 03-10-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailaway21 View Post
Long leads on head, stern, and spring lines will allow for storm-surging.
Agreed. Slack them off a bit if the space in your slip will allow it. Double up your lines. Use chafe gear at the chocks, add fore and aft spring lines, deploy ALL your fenders and don't neglect the side not facing the dock, as this protects you from the other guy if he comes loose, and protects other guys from you if your dock fails. If you expect serious, sustained heavy weather, strip off your furling sail and lash down your sail cover to your boom.

Consider hanging a fender board between your midship fenders and the dock. This can be a wooden plank, plastic board or PVC piping:

Making Your Own Fender Boards in 2 Easy Steps

If the water is surging, the board will keep the fenders down, along with distributing the load. If you can get old tires as fenders, so much the better, as they won't ride up as easily.

Lastly, check that your bilges are clean and free of debris that could foul your pumps. Leave the power ON as you may need the batteries fully charged to run the pumps. Close the thru-hulls (except in the cockpit, which need to be checked for debris) and close all hatches and portlights. You'd think this would be obvious, but a boat at our club with a scoop transom habitually had a cockpit portlight from the quarterberth open for ventilation, and took on water from getting "pooped at dock".

Hope this helps. I have been smirked at on occasion for the "robustness" of my docklines and the preparations I take, but I never worry about the boat on windy/stormy days.
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  #22  
Old 03-10-2008
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Originally Posted by sailboy21 View Post
No, this boat is smiling!



I can't beleive they actually manned the rails.. how embarrassing
USS Denver, LPD 9 (I was stationed onboard USS Ponce, LPD 15) No one injured on the collision with USS Yukon during a replenshiment at sea.

Manning the rails is tradition, never embarrassing. Often it's the first look at your new child on the pier.
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  #23  
Old 03-10-2008
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Often it's the first look at your new child on the pier.
Chuckles, thanks for reminding me of the hardships our men and women suffer as they serve this great nation. We owe all of them a very great "Thank you"
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  #24  
Old 03-10-2008
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30 feet aft of that smile, 3rd deck - frame 115 is the berthing compartment for the operations department. About 80 sailors in the same space most folks have for a kitchen, living room and dining room. I bet the off watch had a good wake up call that day.
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Old 03-10-2008
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Eliot Spitzer's in a bunch of trouble.
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  #26  
Old 03-11-2008
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Docked in someone else's slip, I hear, and at an exorbitant rent.
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Old 03-11-2008
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sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice
The wind migh not get him but the storm surge is going to rip his stern right off the wharf.
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Old 03-11-2008
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Originally Posted by chucklesR View Post
30 feet aft of that smile, 3rd deck - frame 115 is the berthing compartment for the operations department. About 80 sailors in the same space most folks have for a kitchen, living room and dining room. I bet the off watch had a good wake up call that day.
Indeed. I served on the Denver shortly after that incident. That picture was taken in Hawaii during RIMPAC, not home port San Diego. That was indeed a very embarrassing time for that crew. On their way back after repairs they had an explosion in the #2 boiler economizer... bad times in the USN. Finest gator in the fleet!
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Old 03-19-2008
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If you are docked on a finger pier, it helps to put lines on the opposite side to pull the boat away from the finger. A line run from the aft cleat to the main dock at a good angle, combined with a bow line (bow in) away from the finger will hold the boat off.

If you can keep the boat away from the dock, you will avoid chafe on the fenders and the possiblity of the fenders being forced away from the boat onto the pier.
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Old 03-20-2008
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I never found tying up for a storm to be rocket science (though I've never weathered a proper hurricane here in Seattle) we did have a nice little 90mph blast last winter which doubled springlines and cleared decks resulted in no issues. I did go down the dock and fix most other folks' improperly tied cleat knots though! I was more worried about their boats hitting mine than anything else.

What really stresses me out though, is docking in weather, especially with a crew of just two. Does anyone have special tricks for coming in the marina with a long narrow fairway and a wind pushing you off the dock? My buddy and I managed to dock in 30 knots on sunday, but the leap from boat to dock with rope in hand becomes a little more critical (and quite risky when you think about it) one slip up could put me in the water, and the boat into the expensive neighbor(s). One nice thing at least is I requested a slip facing south (the direction of the prevailing winds when the weather's heavy here) so when facing a southerly the wind at least isn't pushing us INTO the dock with force...
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