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post #31 of 58 Old 03-18-2008
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I use the Bowline around the house to keep me not forgeting it! What else should I work on? hmmmm... Never heard of frappe
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post #32 of 58 Old 03-18-2008
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The bowline
the round turn and two half-hitches
the cleat hitch
the figure-eight knot or stopper knot
the clove hitch,
the sheet bend,
the rolling hitch,
the reef or square knot
the buntline hitch,

BTW, a Frappe is an ice-cream-based milkshake drink in eastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Frapping a coiled line means you're taking turns of line around the coil to prevent it from uncoiling.



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I use the Bowline around the house to keep me not forgeting it! What else should I work on? hmmmm... Never heard of frappe
P.S. Here's a good page for you to read.

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—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #33 of 58 Old 03-18-2008
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[QUOTE=sailingdog;284559]Frapping a coiled line means you're taking turns of line around the coil to prevent it from uncoiling.



So, not really a knot, just turns around a coil that is then finished off with a hitch......

There is a tide in the affairs of men,
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
Shakespeare, Julius Caesar IV, iii, 217
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post #34 of 58 Old 03-18-2008
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It has been beaten into me that one is never to finish turning up on a cleat with hitches. It was explained that if the line should come under great load, the hitches make it very difficult to release the line. The right way is to put several full turns around the cleat after having done several figure eights on the cleat. The part that holds the line from slipping is the figure eights where they bind against one another across the top. The turns around put on after are simply to keep it snug.
Thoughts?

There is a tide in the affairs of men,
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
Shakespeare, Julius Caesar IV, iii, 217
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I believe this is the case on very large ships, but not on a 30' sailboat. The fact that the lines on a tall ship may be unchanged for days or weeks, under fairly high loads, means that undoing a finished hitch may be very difficult. That generally isn't the case with a 30' cruising sailboat. The loads are lower, the amount of time the lines are under load are generally shorter.
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It has been beaten into me that one is never to finish turning up on a cleat with hitches. It was explained that if the line should come under great load, the hitches make it very difficult to release the line. The right way is to put several full turns around the cleat after having done several figure eights on the cleat. The part that holds the line from slipping is the figure eights where they bind against one another across the top. The turns around put on after are simply to keep it snug.
Thoughts?

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—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #36 of 58 Old 03-18-2008
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Quote:
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I believe this is the case on very large ships, but not on a 30' sailboat. The fact that the lines on a tall ship may be unchanged for days or weeks, under fairly high loads, means that undoing a finished hitch may be very difficult. That generally isn't the case with a 30' cruising sailboat. The loads are lower, the amount of time the lines are under load are generally shorter.
I don't understand why that requires a hitch. Shouldn't that (lesser loads, shorter time) make the hitch unnecessary?

There is a tide in the affairs of men,
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
Shakespeare, Julius Caesar IV, iii, 217
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post #37 of 58 Old 03-18-2008
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Carrick Bend

It used to be when I joined two lines I would put a bowline in one then tie another onto that loop. I thought that was dumb so I looked up the proper knot which is a Carrick Bend.

It is easy to tie and more important for me easy to remember and can be used to join line of various sizes.

Gary
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post #38 of 58 Old 03-18-2008
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1" lines don't blow around in 30 knots of wind and uncoil from a cleat... 3/8" lines, like those found on a 30' sailboat... do.

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I don't understand why that requires a hitch. Shouldn't that (lesser loads, shorter time) make the hitch unnecessary?

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #39 of 58 Old 03-18-2008
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A fun knot to learn is the "Flying Bowline" - also known as the tugboat bowline. It's actually quite easy, once you've seen it done. It's called the flying bowline because it (more or less) finishes tying itself as you throw it. I can tie the thing - but only for demonstrating purposes. Trying to tie one while heading into a slip , it always collides with something and I just end up embarrassed.

Also, one of the things I've noticed - a lot - is that many people incorrectly tie a cleat hitch. It is important to go to the far side of the cleat first - not the near side. If you go to the near side first, it ends up wedging and jamming as soon as it is put under tension. (This is why so many cleats are placed at an angle to the fairlead. When they're directly in line - I am suspicious of the boat builder or designer - what else doesn't he know?)

Saltwater Suzi and Cap'n Larry


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post #40 of 58 Old 03-18-2008
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Quote:
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I had a sailing instructor years ago who could tie a bowline one-handed. He held a piece of line with the bitter end dangling, whipped and flipped it around for a second and sure enough, it came out tied in a bowline.
This was probably the flying bowline just described. I could probably get it one handed with practice.

To finish the knot you have to pull the finished/standing side of the line through the loop made with the "flying" side.

I'll go try it for a bit

1976 25' O'day - "SeaWind"

Hello Sailor: "I've just learned that good boats, in good hands, are damned robust creations."

Last edited by Birdface; 03-18-2008 at 05:25 PM.
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