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  #1  
Old 03-19-2008
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looking to start and need advice

Sorry i see now i think i posted this already in the wrong section but anyone that could help me out would be greatly appreciated. Thanks


Looking for a starting point into sailing, it has always been a dream of mine to sail around the world. I have travelled to all sorts of places around the world and the ocean seems like the last frontier. I am looking for a place to start, such as a crew job of some sort. I am young and relatively healthy and have no problem working hard but want to learn the basics. I want to sail the open ocean and was wondering if anyone had any ideas.

Secondly I am interested in buying a trimaran (probably something around a 30-40 footer) and am looking for some buying advice from people with experience with these boats. I have never sailed before (have been on sailboats once or twice but never did anything to consitute calling it sailing at least for me). I have heard that trimarans are good liveaboards, and stable and seem to have ample room on them. Any help would be greatly appreciated. thanks:
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Old 03-19-2008
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Do you live near the water? Buy a small boat and learn from that, then move up when you are comfortable with your skills and the boat's expense. You can also visit marinas after work or on weekends and ask around about crewing opportunities.
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Old 03-19-2008
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Find a local yacht club (not sure where you live) and go on a Sat. morning and ask around about crewing for some races. That is probably the best and easiest way to learn a lot fast. I would also second the small boat idea. Nothing will teach you boat handleing skills better than learning to sail a small boat (around 15 ft. or less). Would also give you an opportunity to practice things you learn while sailing with others. OP boats are the Best Boats.
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Old 03-19-2008
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Learn on a small boat... because you'll learn a lot more about sail trim and boat balance on a dinghy than you will on a larger boat.

Join a local sailing club or yacht club. Sail as much as you can, and crew on a races, even if they're just 'round the can' type races. The performance tweaking tips you learn racing are important for sailing in heavy and light air in a cruising boat.

Get Dave Seidman's book, The Complete Sailor. It covers a very wide area of sailing theory, history, techniques, skills, and is well written, easy to read with good, and amusing, illustrations.

Trimarans are not really good liveaboards in some ways. If you take three boats, a monohull, a catamaran and a trimaran of the same LOA, the catamaran will have the most room and the worst sailing performance, the trimaran will generally have the least room and best sailing performance, and the monohull will have a moderate amount of room, but the most weight carrying capacity.

Trimarans have a smaller cabin and far less stowage than monohulls or catamarans of the same LOA. One reason is the hull form on a trimaran is much longer and narrower than that of a monohull, and has much shallower bilges—limiting both the amount of living space and stowage.

A catamaran has two hulls, usually longer and narrower than a monohull of the same LOA, but has the entire bridgedeck that connects the two hulls, so often has much, much more living room and stowage—however, if you were to load down the catamaran, it would sail like a pig. Many of the big cruising catamarans down in the Caribbean have to motor in light air for this reason.

Monohulls have more stowage and living space than trimarans, but less than the much wider bridgedeck-equipped catamarans. However, a monohull usually has a much greater displacement than a trimaran or catamaran of the same LOA and a greater PPI than either—so you can often load more supplies, equipment and people into a monohull before it negatively impacts the performance, than you could in a trimaran or catamaran.

Start slow... get a boat, learn the boat's personality and quirks, take the boat on progressively longer trips, with exposure to greater varieties of weather and sea conditions. Start off coastal cruising, and then slowly work your way out to short ocean passages, then longer ones... If you're serious, you can get the skills and experience you need to do this in a couple of years. Then set off on your circumnavigation.

Don't announce your circumnavigation to the world like Heather or David did. Do it quietly and competently. If you announce it, the amount of pressure on you to start will probably overwhelm you. Most people sail around the world by sailing one-day at a time... and many never intended to circumnavigate... but just wanted to sail.
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Old 03-19-2008
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What is your budget for boat and adventure?
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well.....

well thanks for the advice, i am looking for something that can sleep several people, not so worried about the performance just that it can sail the open ocean and has a decent amount of deck space. I figured a trimaran is more stable especially for someone just learning..... as for my budget, looking to spend around $20,000? is that completely unreasonable?? possibly more i dont need a new fancy boat, just something that is solid, i dont mind working on it. just looking for something to cruise the coasts with to start and then move out to ocean sailing once i know what im doing like you guys have talked about, im not expecting to be sailing across the ocean anytime soon. I also for some reason just like the design of trimarans..... that they can go in shallow water, have nice open space and are stable..... im not too worried about speed at this point. thanks
john
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Old 03-19-2008
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maybe you should consider a house boat might be more affordable, seeing sailing is not high on the list
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Very difficult to get a seaworthy boat in that price range that can support more than 2 people...even that is tough. You need to be thinking in terms of an old 20-30ft monohul with that budget. Read John Vigors 20 small boats to take you anywhere for ideas about what you need and some boats to think about. Forget about a Tri for your plans.
Botom line: Cruising Plans...Boat Size/Accomodations...Budget
Pick any two out of the three and you can do it. Otherwise adjust your plans.
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Old 03-19-2008
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A budget of $20,000 is not really much if you're looking for a 30-40' boat, much less a trimaran in that size range. Most trimarans, unless you're looking at an old home-built Piver, Wharram or Brown design, are going to be considerably more than that.

You might be able to get the Telstar 26, which is the predecessor to the boat I have, in that price range. I don't believe that a Telstar 26 will sleep more than two or three comfortably for any extended period of time.

However, I don't generally recommend learning to sail on a trimaran, since you will generally learn much faster on a sailing dinghy. Things like sail trim and boat balance become very obvious on most sailing dinghies.

Finding a boat that can sleep several people comfortably for any duration for $20,000 is also going to be a pretty good trick. There are a few three-cabin boats in the 35-40' length range, but none that I would consider buying for that price.

I'd highly recommend two books if you're serious about multihull sailing. The first is Chris White's The Cruising Multihull. The second is Thomas Firth Jones's Multihull Voyaging. I've mentioned these books before.

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnniespaceboy View Post
well thanks for the advice, i am looking for something that can sleep several people, not so worried about the performance just that it can sail the open ocean and has a decent amount of deck space. I figured a trimaran is more stable especially for someone just learning..... as for my budget, looking to spend around $20,000? is that completely unreasonable?? possibly more i dont need a new fancy boat, just something that is solid, i dont mind working on it. just looking for something to cruise the coasts with to start and then move out to ocean sailing once i know what im doing like you guys have talked about, im not expecting to be sailing across the ocean anytime soon. I also for some reason just like the design of trimarans..... that they can go in shallow water, have nice open space and are stable..... im not too worried about speed at this point. thanks
john
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Old 03-20-2008
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Good luck finding affordable moorage for a trimaran!
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