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Old 04-11-2008
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Diesel Fuel...marine or land based

I haven't been able to find this thread here, but I imagine it has been asked, I apologize in advance.

The new fuels are extra low in sulfur content. If I use land based Diesel fuel will there be a problem? I have additives already planned to put in the fuel, as on my 18 Horse Yanmar diesel, I sip maybe 1/4 of a tank a season-60 hours on the engine.

Any thoughts? Also, some of my additives are old and I will probably buy new ones. Any recommendations on the additives (brands etc).

Thanks. The reason I ask, is there is no Diesel fill up points near my boat and with a 28 gallon tank I am thinking it is easier to fill up from a land based gas station.

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Old 04-11-2008
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You'll get this same response from others...but you're better off with land based diesel for the mere fact that most marine based fueling locations are older and are stored in metal underground tanks. That spells condensation with our Northeast air temps. And the land based fueling stations get more traffic and like food fuel is best served fresh.

So most additives are of two different types, the first is to separate the water from the fuel, which is not totally possible chemically, and the second is growth inhibitor that kills the organic materials growing in your, and their tanks.

Now the latter will die and run through your Yanmar and may clog it occasionally especially if treat your tank then head to Block Island, the motion of the ocean will stir up the now dead growth and feed it through your fuel system. Racor makes good second stage filters if you don’t already have one.

Also Racor makes better water separators that are much preferred to the aforementioned chemical water separators.
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Old 04-11-2008
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It will probably be easier and cheaper to fill via jerry can... Pete makes good points about the fuel's quality as well. Be aware that low-sulphur fuels can be hard on older engines, since the sulphur is used as a lubricant in the engine IIRC.
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Old 04-11-2008
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You'll get this same response from others...but you're better off with land based diesel for the mere fact that most marine based fueling locations are older and are stored in metal underground tanks. That spells condensation with our Northeast air temps. And the land based fueling stations get more traffic and like food fuel is best served fresh.

While I would generally agree with this, it needs to be pointed out that none of the traffic buying fuel at land based stations is buying 500 gal. at a time. Marie based fuel locations get less traffic, but generally buy in MUCH bigger quantity. I know that my marina gets refilled with fuel on a weekly basis through the summer. I'm guessing that will make their fuel much fresher than any land based operation within 100 miles.
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Old 04-11-2008
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I think it depends on the marina; number of berths, and how many boats are running big diesels.

To counter-balance the new ULSD diesel, I'm running a blend of Bio-Diesel with Petro-Diesel. I currently mix 2/3 Bio with 1/3 ULSD. The Bio-Diesel has much better lubricating properties and it reduces the noxious smell and CO when running the engine.

The only drawback(s) are that if you have old fuel lines they will require replacement. All new(er) lines are resistant to the solvent properties of Bio-Diesel. The other issues are lower cetane (I use a cetane booster); and it can gel in a cold climate if you don't mix in at least 10-20% Petro-Diesel. The Bio-Diesel causes the growth to sluff off the tank walls; so a tank cleaning is a good prevention to clogged filters.
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Old 04-11-2008
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Gas/Interstate Diesel Truck Stops are best

Places where a lot trucks stop for diesel are best, IMHO. The diesel in these places is always being replenished on a very frequent basis and should be very clean as it would yield problems for truckers if it wasn't. I usually hit a stop on the way up to our boat about every 4 weeks with a 5 gallon jerry jug and fill up. This stop is also a favorite for trucks catching a few Zzzz's overnight, so I know that there probably pulling it, fueling up and then taking a nap before starting out on the road early the next morning.

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Old 04-11-2008
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What about getting a tank and having a heating oil company deliver? I'm pretty sure it's the same as diesel. The only thing different is that they put a red dye in it. If you're caught driving on the roads with the stuff in your tank, you're in trouble. The red dye shows that no highway taxes were paid.

I've worked on a couple farms. We had tanks from which we filled the tractors, bobcats, etc. When the tank ran low, we just called the heating oil company, and they delivered the red dye diesel.

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Old 04-11-2008
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I have been told the best place to fill up is where th fishing fleets fill. If you are only using a small amount of fuel during the season consider cleaning out your big tank, leaving it empty and fitting a day tank with no more than 5gal.
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Old 04-11-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NautiG View Post
What about getting a tank and having a heating oil company deliver? I'm pretty sure it's the same as diesel.
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That's what a lot of commercial fishermen in Down East Maine do. About once a week the heating oil dealer would come down to the fishpier and the boats would line up.

I have to say though, if you are filing up with a jerry can once every couple of weeks; it would probably be simplest to stop at the nearest gas station that is close to a highway. The only real advantage to using heating oil is the cost savings.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SimonV View Post
If you are only using a small amount of fuel during the season consider cleaning out your big tank, leaving it empty and fitting a day tank with no more than 5gal.
Hmm... I think you might want to keep your main tank fuller so that condensation won't form. If you go out further than expected or if you are in heavy current and the wind dies; the 5 gal might not get you home. I can see a racing boat that is not sailing too far from their marina keeping fuel level minimal; but I prefer to keep my tank topped up.
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