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  #11  
Old 06-05-2008
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Are boat owners/sailors overly anal?

My wife thinks so - especially with my preference for properly making up all unused running rigging lines and neatly coiling excess deck & docklines.

Although, our puppy never complained . . .

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  #12  
Old 06-05-2008
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Quote:
One time knowing we were going to hit weather, and I was going to be stuck at the helm, I had asked for things to be stowed below, and made shipshape. I was assured it was... after the trip, I looked below... stuff was everywhere. All I said was "this is why I wanted to be sure stuff was stored properly".
On one of our first boats, there wasn't enough storage to secure things for bumpy weather, so part of the prep for a rough crossing was to throw everything on the cabin sole, because that's where it was going to end up. We used to laugh about it, but nothing got broken that way.

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My wife thinks so - especially with my preference for properly making up all unused running rigging lines and neatly coiling excess deck & docklines.


Although, our puppy never complained
I was wondering how many others had wives that were experts on all matters on the boat. It's just like when we're driving somewhere and she's always telling me that the car ahead of us is "braking". I keep telling her it's amazing that I don't rear end everybody when she's not driving from the back seat.
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  #13  
Old 06-05-2008
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I must confess, I was a big-time power boater, long before I purchased a sailboat, so comments I offer about my learning curve may help to explain powerboat owner behavior.

First, most power boaters usually start their careers on small, trailerable boats, where docking skills and knot-tying are infrequently used. These skills still haven't been developed when they move up into larger boats.

Second, the guests aboard most powerboats are boating novices, who haven't got a clue about boat operations. Heck, many powerboat skippers haven't got a clue either.

Third, even if one takes a safe boating course ( I did, but most don't) I can't recall docking skills ever being taught.

Finally, most power boaters are never given good role models to emulate. It's learn as you go along and hope for the best. How often does a power boater get to "crew" for someone else?

Sailboating has a much more demanding learning curve than power boating. There's a heck of a lot more to do to get the boat to move from Point A to Point B. These skills have to be developed almost immediately, whereas a power boater has more time to grow.

Sailboating has much more rigid performance expectations than power boating. IMHO, sailboaters are far more critical of their fellow enthusiast's lapses than power boaters are. If a sailboat drags anchor, it negatively reflects upon the competence of the boat's skipper. If a powerboat drags. it's to be expected because, after all, he's only a stupid power boater. Sailboaters hold each other to a higher standard.

Finally, sailboaters generally consider themselves superior to power boaters. No doubt the additional skills one must learn to become a successful sailor contributes to this attitude. Taking pride in one's ability to cross 60 miles of Gulf Stream in 12 hours, rather than 3 hours by powerboat, appeals to the "longer is better" purist within each of us.

To further cement our "specialist" attitude, we have developed an entire vocabulary which is unique to sailboating. I've owed and cruised my Hunter 30since 2000 and I'm still learning the "proper" names for boat stuff. The most recent one was "snatch block". When I owned my 35 ft. powerboat all I had to know was "twin 454 Crusaders". That said it all!

I conclude that most sailboaters are not overly anal. We just set higher standards of behavior for ourselves. Of course, this has nothing to do with the many pairs of eyes drilling in on us when we enter an anchorage.
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Old 06-05-2008
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I'd say most are quite anal I don't think this is the crux of your thread but I've learned not to take anything personally. Whether it's how to handle the sails during a maneuver to how to tie a certain knot, I've literally yet to meet two people who are the same. I've been praised for one thing one week and chastised for the same thing the next week on a different boat (well, chastised is a harsh word but told it was wrong). At the same time, there's obviously a lot of differences in the way a specific boat will handle. Particularly in racing, I try and ask a few basic questions such as: does the skipper want you to back the jib at all through a tack, etc.

I usually like when the owner does the dock lines so if it floats away in the next storm it won't be my fault
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  #15  
Old 06-05-2008
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I think that AlanBrown has hit it on the head. The mindset of a sailor is different from that of a powerboater. How many powerboaters do you know that have re-powered their boat themselves? How many sailors do you know that have modified or replaced the rigging on their boat on their own. I am guessing that one number is going to be much higher than the other.

Also, another point, which I don't think he made is that many sailors start at a relatively young age... This combined with the mentoring often shown novice sailors, means that sailors often get a deeper education than do powerboaters.
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  #16  
Old 06-05-2008
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yes I am anal but i also try to learn from others why they do something a certain way. it might be better than what I do. but its appalling how many people do not know how to cleat a dockline. I always check behind others for that. otherwise it's amazing how many people will get on my boat and start changing stuff without a comment .
one small example, i tie figure 8 stopper knots in the lines that need them and leave about a 6 inch tail to have something to grab if necessary. one experienced friend redid all of them to remove the tail. i left them alone and redid them when he left.

so anal?? guilty!!
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  #17  
Old 06-05-2008
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Once or twice a season I go fishing on my friend's 32 foot sportfisherman. I have a great time, he is an absolute expert on fishing, but I cringe and shut up when I look at the seamanship. The dock lines are always the first thing that make me look askance, but its pretty much everything. I think the big reason is that he regard his boat as nothing more than transportation to his fishing spots, whereas I regard the sailing as the purpose. The difference is philosophical. I reagrd the point as the journey, he regards it as the destination. Because we are so focused on the journey -- and it does take longer -- we try to make sure everything is just so. So I guess we are all a little anal.
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Old 06-05-2008
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I'm anal and I ask that those who sail w/ me do things my way. When I sail with others, I do it their way. Reason: it everyone on board does things the same way you know what to expect. When it's dark and scary on the foredeck you really don't want to be figuring out how the last guy coiled/cleated/stowed the main haulyard. When you're stressed "patterns" of how you do things rule. Always do things the same way and the "patterns" will be your friend, not a source of confusion.
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Old 06-05-2008
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Nothing I hate worse than going to the pointy end to rig a stay or make a sail change, only to find that someone has screwed everything up and I have to spend more time in a saltwater shower equipped elevator on steroids because of it. It really chaps my ass. Hence, I check everything these days, from the lay of the lines to how they're secured off.
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Old 06-05-2008
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Type A personality

I'm not anal because I sail, I sail because I'm anal. What other sport has two competitors on an 18 mile course finishing within 15 secs after 2 hours. Where the difference between winning and losing is less than a degree of pointing or tacking 15 secs behind or ahead of a windshift? Now granted I do not race (as of yet ). But the perfection that can be found in simplicity is what drew me to sailing...Yes I am a reformed powerboater.
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