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  #11  
Old 06-07-2008
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This is a very sad story. My thoughts and prayers go out to the family.

A bit of trivia about secondary drowning though. If any of you have ever seen the movie "The Abyss" you might know about the US Navy's Liquid breathing apparatus. This was real technology that worked in experiments but had to be abandoned because subjects experienced secondary drowning as a result of the oxygenated solution washing the surfacant out of the lungs.
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  #12  
Old 06-08-2008
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The rarity of this sort of thing is due to the causative factor, the initial damage done by the water intrusion. The fluid buildup, also called pulmonary edema, is commonly seen in medical conditions commonly referred to in association with heart failure. It also is seen in renal patients that are in fluid overload. The fluid has to go somewhere, and depending on their overall status, it may not move into the "thirdspaces" mostly in the extremeties. When it cannot move out of the cardiovascular space, it backs into the lungs. People with weakened hearts depend on diuretics to help remove excess fluid, because the cardiac output is insufficient to properly perfuse the kidneys. Being that heart disease is such a major health issue, dry drowning (due to pulmonary edema brought on by heart failure) is a common form of death. It, however, is not called this, probably since there is no initial physical drowning in the traditional sense....aaaaand it's not a very medical-sounding term.
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Old 06-08-2008
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Yeeks! My two youngest daughters are in Florida right now...we just got a call from them an hour ago...seems like my middle daughter inhaled or swallowed enough sea water to throw up while there group was out snorkeling on some reef...I think I had better call back down there and talk this over with her..

Tragic story...and I had never heard of this fanomania befor..What a heart wrencher.
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Old 06-08-2008
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When I was in high school a good friend of mine had a problem something like this he went scuba diving and inhaled so much water that he was very ill for a couple of days. The doctor would not let him lay down for about 36 hours. This was a hundred years ago so I'm sure the treatment would be different today. But we all thought he might die for the first day. His lips were blue and he had great difficulty breathing.
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Old 06-08-2008
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While a phone call is in order, as is discussing a possible hospital visit, from what I've seen, if they're throwing up, it is usually because they swallowed the water, not that it got in the lungs. Better safe than sorry though.

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Originally Posted by Stillraining View Post
Yeeks! My two youngest daughters are in Florida right now...we just got a call from them an hour ago...seems like my middle daughter inhaled or swallowed enough sea water to throw up while there group was out snorkeling on some reef...I think I had better call back down there and talk this over with her..

Tragic story...and I had never heard of this fanomania befor..What a heart wrencher.
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  #16  
Old 06-08-2008
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The "Standard of Care" for ems is hospital care for anyone that has a 'near drowning' experience. Many people think the patient is OK if they're able to walk and that they just had a 'close call'. But a real Doc needs to auscultate lung sounds and follow up treatment.
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