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  #11  
Old 07-03-2008
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  #12  
Old 07-03-2008
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The Admiral (MMR here on sailnet) intimated last night that my ‘prepare to get underway’ post on another thread was a highly edited, more serious version of what actually goes on. Okay, she down right said that if I didn’t post the real check list she’d blow my cover.
Here goes:

Day Sail and Cruising (over night) underway checklist on my Multihull

Transform body into camel and hump supplies to boat. Swear from now on you will just leave the stuff on the boat.

Multihulls are very sensitive to weight as it adversely affects performance. Attempt (again) to have Admiral reduce day sail luggage to either a top or a bottom for her bikini, but not both.
For multiday cruising a sarong can be added, if desired.

Store all three varieties of Rum (always written and spoken with a capital ‘R’ onboard Patience Two) close to (meaning within reach of) the helm station. Fill Ice bucket and place on top of fridge, next to Rum.

Stick the Admirals Rum wherever it fits best, damn fruity stuff anyway.

Put or ensure at least 6 cans of Coke Zero (per day) in the fridge, on the door where they can be found. Remember one out means one in, warm diet coke sucks warm water is drinkable by others.

Put wallet and keys away, put nerd strap on glasses, no need to give up more than already given to Uncle Chessie (four pairs in the first two years). Remove all items from pockets that you intend to keep, store them wherever you are standing (helps later when you get back in, you can play the ‘where the hell did you put my …’ game).

Put open cigarettes and lighter at helm, put extra’s in away in safe place you can (hopefully) remember later.

Assign (beg) the Admiral to put stuff away below decks, ensure her you are going to be working hard on the hot exterior of the boat.

Take covers off helm instruments, it helps later.

Remove, or at least flip up, the dog house window cover. Look forward from helm and make sure you can see bow. Drop window between helm and salon. Reach through window and make sure you can reach the bottle of Rum on the Fridge top.

Look inside and see if Admiral is doing anything, if not ask for permission to sail, if she’s actually busy ask her to do something using arcane nautical terms and accents. Confuses the heck out of them.

If you have guest(s) onboard that have never been aboard before, give the safety and familiarization tour. Use the book you wrote for that, no need to explain what a ‘sea ****’ is again, especially to your mother. Make sure that in the event of an emergency they know that you are the most important person aboard, it behooves them to retrieve you if you fall overboard.

Make a Gossling and Coke Zero, light a cigarette and sit at the helm with a salty look. Consider the wind and current and how it will affect getting out of the slip. If the wind is abeam at 10 knts or more go below and drop one or both centerboards to prevent drift once untied and ‘oh crap’ moments.

Turn on VHF, Sailing instruments, Stereo and GPS, go back to helm and ensure they actually, really, don’t have covers on still. Plug in IPod and put on sailing tunes. Play enough Buffett and Eileen Quinn and people will ‘know’ you are a sailor.

Take handheld VHF to helm, turn to 16 and monitor for funny conversations and newbies making mistakes.

Remove Mainsail cover, even if you aren’t really going to sail just take it off so when you pull back in or anchor where you are going people will think you actually sailed the boat. For realism, it helps if you knock down any cobwebs, old bird nests etc. from the rigging.

Stuff the cover into the salon in a reasonably folded shape, or just shove it down the nearest hatch. Placate the Admiral, who’s head you probably just dropped it on.

Also while forward look at the bow and make sure the anchor is actually up – no need to go through ‘that’ again while leaving the slip, it wasn’t that much fun the first time.

While up at the center of the boat make sure the Banana colored Kayak laying athwart ships is secured, tidy up the lines and make sure no snags will occur later.

Drop the drive leg, start the motor, check that water is flowing out the exhaust. Bump the boat into forward, then reverse to check transmission. Time it so the Admiral gets a little bump when you hit the end of the dock lines 

While difficult to do, it’s time to turn off the air conditioner and leave the world of comfort behind. Turn off all 110v, remove the plug from the pier, then the boat. Leave the power line where it is, we have more onboard.

Don’t forget to tell the Admiral that you have to cut off the A/C now. Lessen the blow by complimenting her on the sarong (or monokini) if she’s wearing one.

Check that the engine instruments indicate normal conditions (no smoke, no loud metal tearing sounds, certainly no fire, at least some fuel in at least one tank, temperature below 160, oil at 40 – 50psi, alternator putting out 14v or so).

Announce to Admiral the boat will momentarily depart the pier. Make sure she understands that means she may lose her internet connection to buyeverything.com.

Walk calmly around the boat from aft port to fwd port, stbd fwd, stbd aft releasing lines, toss lines back unto the hook on the piling so you can find them later.

Walk forward to helm, bump boat into forward for 1 second, then walk to port and release spring line, laying it on pier so you can find it later. Walk back to stbd helm and drive boat out of slip (yes it really is that easy, even in 10-15 knots on the beam).

Announce to Admiral we are underway on fossil fuel, and she may now relax in the cockpit – and if she could, you could use a refill.

Wave at the boat ramp, other boaters and such, dodge the ducks.

Sadly, you must not use the autopilot until well underway and out of the creek.


Anyone know how to anchor a multihull?
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  #13  
Old 07-03-2008
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Obviously, I have too much time on my hands.

Craig, not this time, I'll either be committee or racing/rounding the bouys and heading off to somewhere for anchoring.
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  #14  
Old 07-03-2008
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Still a boring day at work. Here with


Using the Mainsail
Or
What to do when out of fuel

Every once in a while it becomes necessary to ‘raise the main’, for example when out of fuel and TowboatUS refuses to tow you to your dock again.

If you did the pre-underway checklist properly the main sail cover has already been removed. If not, remove it now and stuff it below decks somewhere.

Loosen the main sheet (red rope, in the cockpit threaded through all the pulley things at the back of the cockpit). It’s a 4 in 1 arrangement, let two or three feet of rope go through the pulleys.
Make sure you do this especially if you didn’t have Wheaties this morning or haven’t eaten your Popeye brand spinach today - it makes raising the main easier.

Point the boat into the wind, if the engine is dead (and why else would you be doing this) do the best you can.

Turn on the autopilot and set it to windvane mode, watch it cycle helplessly with no steerage, then ignore it.

Go to the mast. If you aren’t wearing a PFD you will fall overboard, if you are it’s just possible, not certain.

Take off the sail ties, it was not fun the last time you forgot them.
(these are the blue bandy strap things wrapped around the mainsail, note how they are tied so you can tie them back on later).

Loosen the topping lift (red and white rope) it should lower the boom about four inches until it rests on the coach roof. Make sure it’s not bouncing around and knocking off things like the horn, the GPS antenna etc. If it is, hurry so maybe it will not break too much.

Loosen the lazy jacks on both sides of the mast (gold and white ropes cleated on the uppermost cleat) loosen them at with least two feet of play, re-cleat the lazy jack ropes when done, again, wasn’t fun fixing that last time.

For reefing instructions see page titled “oh crap the wind is over 10 knts, now what”

Unwrap the blue and white rope, that is the main halyard, halyard is a corruption of the English for ‘haul hard ya’ll’, because that’s what you are going to do. Put three wraps on the winch, no, the one on the same side of the mast that the halyard is hanging on.

When the boom is centered in its wild swinging around, pull like heck and get as much sail up as you can before it snags a lazy jack. If it snags a lazy jack, time the boom till it’s centered again and haul away again.

Continue hauling, pull really hard. Use both hands you idiot. Ignore the blisters forming and popping and pull. Wrap the line around your waist and turn like a top, do whatever it takes to keep pulling. It’s okay to cry and whimper if no one can see you.

When the main sail is almost all the way up, about 12” (that inches you wimp, not feet) from the top slide your left hand forward on the rope and take ahold of the winch handle with the right.

Now crank on the winch handle while pulling with the left hand (this is a non-self tailing winch, stupidest thing I can imagine on a main halyard). Grind grind grind, grind. It might take all of five seconds, put if you try really hard you can make it.

Ideally the main should be all the way up with just a slight vertical wrinkle about 6 inches back from the forward edge (luff). Ideally you had a crew on board to do the work, if not, good enough is good enough.

Oh, secure the halyard to the cleat, don’t just let go; that was seriously not funny the last couple of times.

Wipe the tears from your eyes and ignore the pain in your back, arms and bleeding palms and without getting blood on the pretty white boat make your way back to the cockpit. Drink some Rum and smoke a cigarette once you can breathe again.

Depending on which way the wind was coming you may already be ‘sailing’. Check the GPS and see if you are moving at faster than 1 knot. If not you are ‘drifting’. Turn off the autopilot and steer the boat around from left to right, observe if the boat actually sails and whether or not the sail has wind in it.

If you are sailing, and not heading for some hard pointy object or shallow water (check the chart plotter and this time believe what it says) you may establish a course. A course is the direction you want to go to get home of ‘course’ (get it?) – see Navigation, under ‘where I am’ on the page entitled ‘I wanna go home’.

If ‘home’ is downwind you are in luck, point the bow (front of the boat) towards where the GPS says is home, let the sail out some more (mainsheet looser) and continue. If home is not downwind you might want to consider moving.

If you must go upwind, go below and drop the centerboard on the side the wind will be coming from 3 turns on the winch. For additional speed (if Rum or cigarettes are in short supply) it may help to raise the drive leg and reduce drag, although being out of Rum is already a drag.

Trim the mainsail in using the mainsheet, pull some rope in, if your hands are too sore still use your teeth or toes to pull. The tell tales (flappy garbage bag looking things on the back of the mainsail) should be flapping in the wind, not hanging lose. It’s easier sometimes to change course as you only have to turn the wheel, but if you have to go in the same direction you have to trim the sail, suck it up and pull on the rope until the flappy things and actually flapping, all of them.

Finer sail trim might be required, for that you use the Traveller, so named because it helps you travel. I can’t remember enough about it and how to use it so just go below and get the book “sailing for dummies” and look up “what’s this tracky thing at the back of my boat”.

Last edited by chucklesR; 07-03-2008 at 10:10 AM.
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  #15  
Old 07-03-2008
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That's some great entertainment for 4th of July eve.
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  #16  
Old 07-03-2008
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Hopefully some of the newer sailors can use my guide to help them learn the ropey things. Anything I can do to help with safety out there is a good thing.

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Old 07-03-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chucklesR View Post

Anyone know how to anchor a multihull?
Consult chart to find shallowest water in anchorage. One of the pleasures of a multihull is to be able to have a secluded anchorage. Entertain self watching boats run aground as they try to approach your anchorage.

A corollary is to cut on the wrong side of markers and chuckle as boats following you run aground.

If in a crowded anchorage with wind and current in counter directions, anchor close to other boats. Raise your arms and scream like you're on an amusement park ride as you do 360s around your anchor.

Scott
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  #18  
Old 07-03-2008
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One advantage of anchoring in shallow water is that the monohulls that drag down on you usually get stuck before they get to you.
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  #19  
Old 07-03-2008
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Generally speaking I just hit the down switch on my anchor windlass whenever I get tired of sailing. If I stop it's good enough, if not I turn off the motor and try again.

If I see a beach I point the boat at it, drop my stern anchor and run up on the beach. When I want to leave I get a power boat to pull me off.
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Old 07-04-2008
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Next week's episode: Down the Mine -- Jibes Gone Horribly Wrong.

Fun reading, Chuckles. Butbutbut ... if you ain't hiked to below the knees, how ya supposed to know you are sailing? I want a boat that feels like it's working hard.
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