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-   -   Help for clueless newby (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/general-discussion-sailing-related/46401-help-clueless-newby.html)

runner 08-25-2008 03:36 PM

Help for clueless newby
 
I purchased a 16 foot long by 64 inch wide aluminun sailboat this weekend to restore. The basic boat is all there for the most part, but it is not rigged. I don't know anything about sailboats except what I have read in the last few days. I have a few questions!!!

Since there are no markings to identify the boat, I will attempt to describe the boat as best I can. I apologise for not being up on the correct lingo yet. The boat is 16 feet long and 63-64 inches across. It has an aluminum mast with an adjustable foot position. The mast is 20 feet with a track for the piece that the main sheet attaches to to hoist the sail. It does not provide for an internal line. The boom slides up the same track. There is one cleat at the bottom rear of the mast that I assume is for a downhaul on the boom. It has a jib sail that is a few feet shorter than the main. It attaches with bronze clips to the front mast support cable and I am not sure where it cleats down yet. There are two cleats on the front edge of the cockpit that could be used to move it from one side of the mast to the other. The bottom mast corner is controled by the line only The boom has a sheave at the mid point and near the end both. There are cockpit cleats at the midpoint of the boom on each side of the cockpit and one on the rear of the centerboard well. There are two line eyes mounted on the deck outboard and a little to the rear of the front corners of the cockpit. Other than the rudder mounts and the motor mount brackets, those are all the attachment points on the boat.
If I use the two cleats at the front of the cockpit to hold the jib sheet and the lower corner of the sail, then I have to move the sheet around the mast by hand each time, but the jib sheet is the only line really needed. If I use two ropes snapped to the eye on the sail, and then run thru the eyelets on the deck and tied at the rear cleats, all I have to do is ease one and tighten the other to move the rear of the jib from side to side. That is simple. Rigged that way, the sheet that hoists the sail would be cleated at the front of the cockpit and two separate lines would actually control the sail. That would allow about 4 feet of side to side movement of the back corner of the jib. I don't know if that much is needed or not. I am guessing that is the way it was rigged before.
That leaves one cleat open on the back end of the board well to control the side to side on the boom. The boom has two pulleys. One middle and one to the rear to control the boom. It also has a smaller pulley to pull the sail taut mounted on the boom itself. The main sheet and the rigging for the boom are gone. Looking at the pictures and diagrams online, I don't have the hardware for a rig like most I have seen. If the center pulley connects to the cleat on the back of the board well, Then what is the back pulley for? I need some help!
That is the first of my many questions! Thanks in advance for any help given!

sailingdog 08-25-2008 04:10 PM

Runner-

Go to the song chain and post eight posts so you can post links to photos and then link to some photos. Also, read the post in my signature, since it has a lot of useful information for new users....including how to post photos.

Photos would help a lot on a post like this. :)

imiloa 08-25-2008 04:23 PM

Read up too
 
Runner,

I suggest you also get a good basic book on sailing and sailboats so you can study up and familiarize yourself with the terminology. You'll learn quickly that everything on a sailboat has a specific name and using the correct names will make communicating with other sailors much easier. Best of luck with your project.

Gary

sailingdog 08-25-2008 05:01 PM

For books, I'd highly recommend Dave Seidman's The Complete Sailor. About $17 at Borders or Barnes & Noble. A bit less on-line.

runner 08-25-2008 05:03 PM

Thanks!
 
I was told this boat dates back to the forties. If it had any kind of identification, I have not found it. It is still possible I will find something as I strip the many layers of paint.
As far as the lingo goes, I will pick it up. Still have not seen the name of the sliding piece that is on the end of the main sheet and slides in the channel of the mast. That is the only piece I don't have that is needed to rig the boat the way it used to be rigged that I know of.
Right now the boat is upside down with paint stripper being used on one side. I am posting between scraping sessions. I don't know if a shot of the bottom is going to help, but I will get one if you think it would help. I will get pictures of the boat upright as soon as I can.
The hull is around 200 pounds, but I am gonna scrape 10 of that off at least.
Does that book describe or diagram small boat rigging in any way?
Again, thanks in advance! Have a beautiful day.

poopdeckpappy 08-25-2008 05:07 PM

Quote:

Still have not seen the name of the sliding piece that is on the end of the main sheet and slides in the channel of the mast.
sail lugs ???

camaraderie 08-25-2008 05:47 PM

Are you talking about the gooseneck that you use to put the BOOM into the mast? The main SHEET attaches to the headboard at the top of the sail and the sail is generally attached to the mast with sail slides or lugs which slide up a track or channel on the mast.

Whampoa 08-25-2008 06:18 PM

Cam, I've never seen the mainsheet attached to the headboard before :D Was that on a multihull? :D :D :D

sailingdog 08-25-2008 06:43 PM

Cam-

On my boat, the Main HALYARD attaches to the Headboard... at the top of the sail. The Main SHEET attaches to the boom. :) Maybe it is a good thing you are taking up RV'ing. :) ;) :p
Quote:

Originally Posted by camaraderie (Post 358456)
Are you talking about the gooseneck that you use to put the BOOM into the mast? The main SHEET attaches to the headboard at the top of the sail and the sail is generally attached to the mast with sail slides or lugs which slide up a track or channel on the mast.


JohnRPollard 08-25-2008 07:05 PM

Runner,

Camaraderie misspoke above. He meant to say "main halyard" not "main sheet". A halyard is a line or cable that is used to hoist or lower a sail. A sheet is a line that is used to trim (i.e., pull in or ease out) a sail.

It's a bit tricky to understand how your boat is rigged without seeing some photos. But I think the "pulleys" (by the way, in most cases, we refer to pulleys as "blocks", as in "block and tackle") on the bottom of your boom are for the mainsail sheet ("mainsheet") system.

Probably the mainsheet line leads from the cockpit up to the block hanging from the middle of the boom, then aft to the block at the end of the boom, and from there it more than likely leads down to bridle or other attachment point at the stern where it gets tied off. You would hold and trim from the end of the mainsheet that hangs down into the cockpit from the block at the middle of the boom. Possibly it leads to another block or cleat near the centerboard trunk.

That's a curious boat you've got there if it's as old as you think it is. Photos would be helpful. Good luck!:)


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