Avoiding & Sailing W/Lobster Pots & Lobstermen - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 09-09-2008
Maine Sail's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Maine Coast
Posts: 5,539
Thanks: 13
Thanked 149 Times in 115 Posts
Rep Power: 15
Maine Sail is just really nice Maine Sail is just really nice Maine Sail is just really nice Maine Sail is just really nice
Avoiding & Sailing W/Lobster Pots & Lobstermen

This topic came up on another forum so I thought I'd share it with you guys too. Here are a few tips on how to deal with lobster pots.

#1
ALWAYS try to pass to the down current, down wind or down tide side of the pot. Never intentionally pass above a lobster pot unless you absolutly know you have the room to do so! They have an uncanny way of letting you know which way is up current, wind or tide and which way is down. Follow the stick or the wake!

This one is pointing or angled towards "down tide" so you'll pass to where the stick leans or points. This is about a 1.5 knot current at the mouth of Penobscot Bay and well off Vinalhaven and Northhaven Islands. We were miles from the nearest land yet Pen Bay has HUGE amounts of water to spill and the currents can run miles out to sea.. NEVER EVER intentionally pass a pot like this to the up tide or up current side!!!

#2 Wear polarized sunglasses!!! My daughter had grabbed my Maui Jim's and got "snack goo" all over them. Rather than clean them I stupidly grabbed my "guest" pair of sunglasses, a non-polarized pair of Ray Ban's.

As you can see we almost hit this pot that was pulled under by the tidal current! My maneuver was late because I never saw it until the absolute last second. At that point I had no choice but to turn hard stbd and pass to the up-current side which as you can see could have been very dangerous. Again, WEAR POLARIZED SUNGLASSES! You will see these submerged pots well before you will with non-polarized glasses. My camera had a polarizing filter so I snapped that as we passed.

#3 just because it's calm does not mean the pots are not still trying to tell you something. Current & tide still exists even in flat glass conditions. Note the direction of the "sticks"...

#4 It may be calm but this pot has a decent current flowing by it. Just look at the "wake" made by the buoy..


Quote:
I passed too close to a lobster guy and he was swearing at me and really pissed how do I avoid pissing these guys off?
Look for his or her "colors" then spot his/her pots on the water and as a courtesy, and for your own safety, these guys are cowboys, get away from them as the boat is likely moving to the next pot that matches the displayed colors!

Lobstermen are required to display their "colors" or one of their own pot buoys mounted up high on the boat so it can be seen.
Note the pot buoy above the radome:

Note the "colors" on the port side wheel house roof:

Note the "colors" laying on the wheel house roof behind the spot light & hanging dead center also look on the water and you'll see two more of his/her pots.. stay away from them:

Pot buoy/colors located on stern end port side of wheel house roof:
__________________
______
-Maine Sail / CS-36T


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




© Images In Posts Property of Compass Marine Inc.



Last edited by Maine Sail; 07-22-2009 at 02:01 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 09-09-2008
nk235's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Long Island
Posts: 404
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
nk235 is on a distinguished road
Halekai36,

Nice Post. I never knew thats how you could tell who pots were who's based off the colors displayed on the boats.

I understand everyone has to make a living and I sure don't complain about lobster pots when enjoying a nice fresh lobster while out to dinner, but man when I am sailing I HATE those things!

I hear it used to be much worse in Long Island Sound before the die off but even now it seems you can't run down below to change a song on the ipod without worrying about running over one of these things. So far I have been lucky and not hit any but def. had some close calls.

The big bright colored ones are bad enough but forget about the little dark ones that sit a foot below the water....thats just pure luck not hitting them.
__________________
Morgan 323

Last edited by nk235; 09-09-2008 at 11:44 AM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 09-09-2008
JohnRPollard's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Chesapeake
Posts: 5,680
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 10
JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by otaga05 View Post
Haleki36 wrote:

"At that point I had no choice but to turn hard stbd and pass to the up-current side which as you can see could have been very dangerous."

Depending on the configuration of your keel and rudder that could be exactly the wrong thing to do.

My rudder is skeg mounted and when I turn the wheel it opens up a slot that will catch the pot warp. When I find myself about to go over a pot warp I simply straighten up the wheel and the warp passes harmlessly underneath. It helps to have your prop in an aperture too. Since I figured this out last season the only pot I caught while sailing was picked up in the middle of tacking with the rudder over to turn.
Hal, Good post. Nice photos. Some of those lobster boats look like the Duffy one of my brothers has on order.

Otaga,

That's pretty well the same with us. We have lots of pot floats here on the Chesapeake, and while we do not deliberately try to run them over, we do not initiate abrupt maneuvers if there's one in our path immediately ahead. We can pretty well pass over them with impunity (skeg hung rudder, prop in aperture). I confess to a skipped heartbeat or two while we wait for them to resurface, but so far in all these years they've never failed to re-appear. Touch wood.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Pacific Seacraft Crealock 31 #62

NEVER CALLS CRUISINGDAD BACK....CAN"T TAKE THE ACCENT
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 09-09-2008
jimmalkin's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: MVY
Posts: 232
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
jimmalkin is on a distinguished road
watch out JRP - the line can get caught between the top of your skeg hung rudder and the hull if you run over the line with your rudder not directly in line with the skeg...(you know how I know...)
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

White Rabbit
Vineyard Haven
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 09-09-2008
JohnRPollard's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Chesapeake
Posts: 5,680
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 10
JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmalkin View Post
watch out JRP - the line can get caught between the top of your skeg hung rudder and the hull if you run over the line with your rudder not directly in line with the skeg...(you know how I know...)
True enough, Jim, and I appreciate the reminder. That's why we try not to maneuver if it appears inevitable that we'll hit one. I'm sure our luck will run out eventually, though. I will be sure to get a hood for my wetsuit (per Halekai) if I ever sail the waters of Maine.

We may have a somewhat different skeg arrangement also. What does yours look like?



__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Pacific Seacraft Crealock 31 #62

NEVER CALLS CRUISINGDAD BACK....CAN"T TAKE THE ACCENT
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 09-11-2008
Maine Sail's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Maine Coast
Posts: 5,539
Thanks: 13
Thanked 149 Times in 115 Posts
Rep Power: 15
Maine Sail is just really nice Maine Sail is just really nice Maine Sail is just really nice Maine Sail is just really nice
Quote:
Originally Posted by otaga05 View Post
Haleki36 wrote:

"At that point I had no choice but to turn hard stbd and pass to the up-current side which as you can see could have been very dangerous."

Depending on the configuration of your keel and rudder that could be exactly the wrong thing to do.

My rudder is skeg mounted and when I turn the wheel it opens up a slot that will catch the pot warp. When I find myself about to go over a pot warp I simply straighten up the wheel and the warp passes harmlessly underneath. It helps to have your prop in an aperture too. Since I figured this out last season the only pot I caught while sailing was picked up in the middle of tacking with the rudder over to turn.
Otaga,

Under sail you'll be fairly safe using that practice but if you're motor sailing don't count on it. I owned a Cape Dory with a very protected aperture and it still could catch a toggle even with the rudder straight.

I dove two seasons ago on an older couples Cape Dory who were under sail, on AP and the free wheeling prop still, even while sailing straight, caught the line. I cut the line free and then oriented the prop vertically in the aperture. I then marked their prop shaft with a marker so they could lock it vertical if they wanted. They now, I'm sure, sail with the prop locked..

Just cause your prop is in an aperture does not make you 100% immune I've discovered this on Downeast lobster boat hulls too...

So lock your prop too and that will also help minimize picking up a pot..

P.S. Have not caught a pot with my fin keelers since 2005 (about 2500 NM) but have picked up that damn floating poly line!!
__________________
______
-Maine Sail / CS-36T


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




© Images In Posts Property of Compass Marine Inc.


Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 09-11-2008
JohnRPollard's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Chesapeake
Posts: 5,680
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 10
JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough
Halekai,

Have you observed any advantage with feathering props, vis-a-vis snagging floats/warps? I assume folding props have a significant advantage, but we can't put one of those in our aperture. In both cases, I'm referring to boats that are not under power.

P.S. We always lock our shaft (in reverse) for exactly that reason. I then hang the key on the transmission lever so I don't forget to go to neutral before starting the engine -- from a "live and learn" experience.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Pacific Seacraft Crealock 31 #62

NEVER CALLS CRUISINGDAD BACK....CAN"T TAKE THE ACCENT
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cats on Board slosharron Living Aboard 74 04-07-2014 10:12 AM
Single-Handed Sailing John Kretschmer Her Sailnet Articles 0 10-19-1999 09:00 PM
Pure and Simple Sailing Micca Hutchins Buying a Boat Articles 0 11-09-1998 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:22 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.