Big Freakin' Sails - Page 109 - SailNet Community
 398Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1081 of 3076 Old 03-26-2009
On the hard
 
CharlieCobra's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Bellingham, WA.
Posts: 3,503
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
pgiann, the likely reason they got tangled was that you didn't maintain tension on the sheets while furling. Anytime you're forced to furl in heavy air, always have a crew member maintain some tension. Not only will it keep the sheets from fouling, it will make for a tighter roll which will make it less likely for the jib to unroll in the heavy air. I'm a prime believer in OJT. It's how I got most of my "useful" experience. Lessons like that aren't quickly forgotten. That which doesn't kill you, serves to make you stronger.

SD, take a pill already.
CharlieCobra is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #1082 of 3076 Old 03-26-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Seaside, Florida
Posts: 3,331
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
   
Giulietta, who is a member of this forum, has a drawing somewhere around here that illustrates a method of taming a rogue jib. If I remember correctly, it involves wrapping your main or spinnaker halyard around forestay of the wildly flogging jib several times, and then shackling it to the tack. Once this is done, you "raise" the halyard, thereby gathering the rogue jib around the forestay.

This is a poor description, but you get the idea. It would be best to try and find and study this remedy. Someone around here will know where it is. It's pretty dang ingenous.
sailhog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #1083 of 3076 Old 03-26-2009 Thread Starter
Last Man Standing
 
smackdaddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 14,481
Thanks: 150
Thanked 145 Times in 138 Posts
Rep Power: 9
     
Yeah, I remember that Hog. It was a very cool technique I just don't remember the details either. I'm a hank-on guy right now.

I do remember that we were talking about it after the nasty story about that Swiss dude getting knocked OB after the furling drum cut loose from it's anchor-plate and started flailing around in a storm. What....20 pounds of steel swinging around all crazy in 40 knots and you're trying to bring it down on a pitching deck? Jeez - that's enough to make anyone swallow hard.
smackdaddy is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #1084 of 3076 Old 03-26-2009
On the hard
 
CharlieCobra's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Bellingham, WA.
Posts: 3,503
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
If ya get in that situation, the best thing to do IMHO would be to blow the furling line and then the jib halyard. Then run offwind to lower the apparent wind. Hopefully, the jib would unfurl, slide down the foil and bunch up at the bottom. This would slow the oscillation down a bunch and after you sheet the mess as much as you could, you could possibly get a line on the rest and tie it all to the foredeck. It would increase windage but it would try to destroy the boat anymore.

Edit: Ya know, I was thinking about this some more and came to the conclusion that there'd be a safer way to do this. Say the furler breaks loose while the foresail is furled. Simply leave it furled and sheet in tight on both sides. This should pin it against either the cabin front or the hull and stop the flogging. You could then, assuming you fly a spinnaker, attach the downhual to the furler foil clip and adjust the three lines to center and pin the whole setup. I would still run offwind to do this to not only lower the apparent wind but to keep from stuffing the bow while the crew is working the foredeck. If the sail is out, you could still pin the foil with the sheets and then reset the drum/foil or pin it using the method above. The biggest risk would be getting knocked OB by the sail.

Last edited by CharlieCobra; 03-26-2009 at 01:25 PM.
CharlieCobra is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #1085 of 3076 Old 03-26-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Old Greenwich, CT
Posts: 128
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
In Defense of Sailingdog

I guess I'll be in the minority, but I have to agree with SD. There are certain preparations you should make on a boat. All of his suggestions made sense to me. Let's face it, we have all made mistakes - I could fill a book with mine. Nonetheless, I am always trying to be prepared as best as possible for whatever is thrown at me.

Smackdaddy, I would have thought you would agree with SD. After all, I have seen you ask a lot of very good questions about how to sail in heavy weather before actually encountering it.

Anyway, just my opinion. Let the debate go on.
twinsdad is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #1086 of 3076 Old 03-26-2009
On the hard
 
CharlieCobra's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Bellingham, WA.
Posts: 3,503
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
I agree with being prepared but everybody makes mistakes, especially when starting out.
CharlieCobra is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #1087 of 3076 Old 03-26-2009
Senior Member
 
mrwuffles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 702
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieCobra View Post
I agree with being prepared but everybody makes mistakes, especially when starting out.
And it doesn't help when you have someone who makes you feel like **** after making the mistake instead of just saying something nice.

What's a signature?????
mrwuffles is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #1088 of 3076 Old 03-26-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Old Greenwich, CT
Posts: 128
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
We all make mistakes

I agree that no one should make you feel bad for making a mistake. There are only three types of sailors: Those who have made mistakes, those who have never sailed, and liars. I must say, though, that I think SD was trying to provide some useful advice. I would rather have someone let me know what I did wrong than just sugar coat it. One of the reasons I really like this site is the good advice you can get on so many relevant topics.

Just by going out there and braving the elements, you have done far more than the average person. But it really is great when you learn from what you did wrong, so you don't make the same mistake twice. After all there are so many other great mistakes we can all make.

Have fun out there.
twinsdad is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #1089 of 3076 Old 03-26-2009
Senior Member
 
blt2ski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 6,862
Thanks: 0
Thanked 26 Times in 25 Posts
Rep Power: 12
   
The other to think about re PG's question, he was asking for what he could have done better. To bold type, write that you should not be out there yadda yadda......... sorry, that's incorrect. It would have been better to put that at the end of the quote, NOT in bold. And describe initially what he could have done better.

Jody, another contributor here, got blasted the same way on SA about a grounding two weeks. Meanwhile, my breaking a boom, another boat grounding, did not get the time of day for many reasons shapes or forms.

But to chastise a person for asking what they could have done different, better etc. thats WRONG! to a few of us, that is what SD is doing here!

marty
Also a dad of twins!

She drives me boat,
I drives me dinghy!
blt2ski is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #1090 of 3076 Old 03-26-2009
On the hard
 
CharlieCobra's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Bellingham, WA.
Posts: 3,503
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
You'll also note that the subsequent posts contained useful information with regards to avoiding that problem in the future or ways to address it safely if it occurs again.
CharlieCobra is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 2 (1 members and 1 guests)
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
luffs, Battens and Leech ? painters Gear & Maintenance 17 11-15-2009 04:56 PM
Sloop or Ketch? maxheadspace Boat Review and Purchase Forum 46 07-27-2007 02:56 PM
Sails on a Boat That I'm Looking At FritzN Gear & Maintenance 9 02-22-2007 11:42 AM
The Balance of Hull and Sails Steve Colgate Buying a Boat Articles 0 05-25-2000 08:00 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome