Big Freakin' Sails - Page 158 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree265Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1571  
Old 10-26-2009
PCP777's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Rockwall
Posts: 124
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
PCP777 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by xsboats View Post
Humble, now there's a word not often used to describe me! I've single-handedly crossed both the Atlantic and Pacific, kayaked many a first descent over 50-75ft waterfalls, climbed to the top of the tallest peaks of most of the continents, and braved marriage not once but twice. The point I was trying to make in my post is that whether you go looking for it or not, given enough time on the water, IT will find you. I am very methodical in all that I do.[Karen and others who know me say I'm anal or at least an a$$] No matter how proactive you are on the water, you are still only perfect here on Sailnet. On the water , you can only hope to understand the rules well enough to stay in the game, you'll never win it. I was fortunate to know enough to get to go home to my wife, son , and unborn daughter. We all read about people we think did stupid things, paid the price, and we say "What an idiot, I would never have done that!" We all have our moments. I was glad that I didn't spend the night out there with anyone else.Don't get me wrong, I'm never one to back down from much of anything, but when it's back in my face, should I be surprised? When you read about someone having "a long, cold night," remember that , in time , they may be reading about you. No matter how well you plan,life can always come up with something you never even thought of.
Fascinating story and your advice is good. What was the weather like before the twister hit? Did you see the weather system coming?
__________________
Peter Powers
1979 TR/FK #1390
~Stephanos~
Bayview Marina,
Lake Ray Hubbard
Dallas, TX


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #1572  
Old 10-26-2009
johnshasteen's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 649
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
johnshasteen is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by xsboats View Post
Humble, now there's a word not often used to describe me! I've single-handedly crossed both the Atlantic and Pacific, kayaked many a first descent over 50-75ft waterfalls, climbed to the top of the tallest peaks of most of the continents, and braved marriage not once but twice. The point I was trying to make in my post is that whether you go looking for it or not, given enough time on the water, IT will find you. I am very methodical in all that I do.[Karen and others who know me say I'm anal or at least an a$$] No matter how proactive you are on the water, you are still only perfect here on Sailnet. On the water , you can only hope to understand the rules well enough to stay in the game, you'll never win it. I was fortunate to know enough to get to go home to my wife, son , and unborn daughter. We all read about people we think did stupid things, paid the price, and we say "What an idiot, I would never have done that!" We all have our moments. I was glad that I didn't spend the night out there with anyone else.Don't get me wrong, I'm never one to back down from much of anything, but when it's back in my face, should I be surprised? When you read about someone having "a long, cold night," remember that , in time , they may be reading about you. No matter how well you plan,life can always come up with something you never even thought of.
XS, I have to agree with you. Having sailed for over 50-years, enduring one hurricane, two Force 10 storms, numerous other bad weather experiences and some very inconvenient groundings in back bays, coastal estuaries and the ICW, I can only say that every sail is an adventure.
__________________
s/v Paloma, Bristol 29.9, #141
Slipped in Bahia Marina, easy access to Corpus Christi Bay and the Gulf of Mexico.

Last edited by johnshasteen; 10-26-2009 at 03:16 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #1573  
Old 10-26-2009
smackdaddy's Avatar
Last Man Standing
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 13,129
Thanks: 84
Thanked 78 Times in 72 Posts
Rep Power: 9
smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough
zz had a wild ride. 23.5 knots! And a dismast!

Sounds like they kept it together and did a great job minimizing damage...

(PS - Bubb, AWESOME story and pics dude. Nice.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by zz4gta View Post
My first multihull experience didn't go as planned. Was fun, and a very wet and fast ride, but I'll let the owner/skipper tell the story. Winds were forecasted to be steady 20-25 with some websites calling for winds up to 35, we didn't see 35, maybe 30.

Begin forwarded message:

Sailed super conservative. Main reefed well below 50% of SA. Started under jib and then sailed first two gybes with screecher. Gybed back to port for the river and hoisted the small chute. Boat felt absolutely great. No slamming, no loading, mast rock solid - no pumping, bow up attitude, new top speed (23.5knots) and finger tip control on the helm.
Smiles all around. Then an explosion heard in my left ear (I think it was parts of the shackle(s) that hold together the uppers, checks and tensioner letting go) and the mast buckled at the intermediates/baby stay (I may have the sequence wrong; things happened fast).

Recovered all the wire (none broken, mast, and sails. Tear in spin and two tears in luff of main. Minor damage to bowsprit attachment at bow.
Screecher halyard badly frayed.

Kevin Duffy, his friend Trevor (not sure last name), and John Nicholson all did a fantastic job of securing gear, minimizing further damage, and cleaning up. I really want to stress this as I can't say enough god things about them collectively an individually. No panic, just calm, cool, and collected.

I think the only thing we eventually lost overboard (or ws stolen from the boat last night) ws the tensioners from both sides and a shackle. I coiled all the wire and stripped as much as I could from the mast this morning (BTW its really shocking how much all that wires weighs!!!).

I thought everyone would know because I heard a call on the radio about a tri losing its mast. We immediately responded that all were on board, in lifejackets, safe and cleaing up and that we did not need or want any assistance. I also radioed that we were abandoning the race and thought I got a response from the RC. That is not intended as a commentary on any previous events; its just the way it played out for us. I needed to stay down wind as the only thing holding the lower half of the mast up was the wind in the remaining main and did not want anyone getting in our way as we secured stuff. We had adequate sea room; the only thing that culd have meesed us up was a boat in the way so I was glad folks stayed clear. There was a large sailing vessel (pretty classic looking
boat) that did head towards us to render aid if it ws needed but he/she seemed to understand what we were doing and they gave us the searoom we needed. Don't know who that was but I owe them a thanks. Anyway, like I said the crew did great, got a line forward to support the remaining stump, and then we eased into the wind and slowely lowered what was left to the deck.

Anybody know somebody with an F27 mast for sale? Boat sure looks sad all cleaned up with no mast.

Not sure what will hapen with insurance but next time the boat will be painted blue and named Viagra. Our fleet might be getting a rep of not being able to keep it up!!

Russ"

Smack, feel free to copy and paste.
-Trevor
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

S/V Dawn Treader - 1989 Hunter Legend 40
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #1574  
Old 10-27-2009
aerie's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Michigan
Posts: 70
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 15
aerie is on a distinguished road
Today marks the one-year anniversary of my BFS. Here is the story I wrote about it. This story and others can also be found in the link to my blog.

“Pan-Pan, Pan-Pan, Pan-Pan. Hello all stations. US Coast Guard Atlantic City has just received a report of an EPIRB signal located 100 miles east of Atlantic City. All vessels transiting the area are requested to keep a sharp lookout, assist if possible and report all sightings to the nearest Coast Guard unit.” I checked our own GPS position, 60 miles upwind of the reported location, and mentally calculated how long it would take us to reach them, at least 8 hours. But we were in survival conditions ourselves, hove to in a force 10 storm with wind gusting into the low 60s, an engine that wouldn’t start, and two crew members down with seasickness. An hour later I was relieved to hear on the radio that the Coast Guard had deployed a rescue helicopter to assist the vessel in distress.

Joy For All, a Farr 50 outfitted for offshore passage making, had left Mystic, CT the previous morning, motor-sailing in light wind from the southwest. Our destination was Hampton, VA, about 400 miles to the southwest where we would join the fleet gathering for the start of the Caribbean 1500 rally. The forecast was calling for a low producing northwest wind at 35 knots to arrive late Monday. We decided to head for the New Jersey coast where we would have a shorter fetch when the associated cold front arrived, and we could run down the coast on a reach. By Monday afternoon the forecast had changed. The low had slowed and was deepening, now producing winds of 45-55 knots with gusts to 60 knots. Tuesday morning at 0130 the front arrived, bringing a 90 degree wind shift immediately intensifying to 30 knots. We tacked, rolled up the genoa and reefed the main further. Engine on, we altered course to head for Atlantic City, 40 miles to windward.

The wind speed increased over the next several hours and the barometer dropped to 994 mb. By Tuesday afternoon our progress toward Atlantic City had slowed to about 2 knots. We were still 12 miles away, and it was apparent we would not reach safe harbor by nightfall. On the radio we heard Atlantic City turning vessels away. The west wind at 45 knots made it unsafe to enter the harbor.

All afternoon the waves breaking over the foredeck had been working on the dinghy lashings and by now the dinghy was lodged against the port stanchions. The lower lifeline had broken and the rigid bottom inflatable would soon be a danger to the boat. Someone would have to go forward. I turned the boat downwind while Gil hooked onto the jacklines with Joy acting as spotter. I tried to keep the boat as stable as possible, but the foredeck was still rolling quite a bit as we surfed down the backs of 12 foot waves at 11 knots. The apparent wind was reduced to 35-42 knots, we were no longer taking green water over the bow, but the foredeck work took longer than normal in those conditions and we held our breath until Gil returned to the safety of the cockpit.

The wind continued to build, now 50 knots sustained gusting to 60. Still motor-sailing with just a scrap of main to reduce the rolling, we idled the engine which caused it to stutter and then stall. All attempts to restart the engine were unsuccessful. Gil and I looked at teach other and I said, “Pull out some staysail.” We tried sailing southwest, then south, then southeast. As the sun was setting we made the decision to heave to. We pulled out enough main to balance the staysail and keep the bow about 70 degrees off the wind, locking the helm to windward. Immediately, the motion of the boat stabilized, heeling at 10 degrees and with a gentle roll as the waves passed under our hull. We were drifting toward the northeast at 3-4 knots, roughly parallel to the NJ shoreline but in the shipping lane. Shortly after we hove to, The Coast Guard hailed us on the radio to see if we were ok. Family had reported us missing when they couldn’t reach us on the sat phone. The cloud cover was so dense there was no satellite signal.

Gil and I took 3 hour watches to watch for ships, the other two crew still down with seasickness. No one felt like eating much, but we tried to stabilize the maelstrom in our stomachs with water and crackers. The wind was a constant howl, making it difficult to talk. I was very grateful for the cockpit enclosure as the temperature dropped into the low 30’s and the occasional wave broke over the cockpit, at times sending seawater down through the companionway hatch. I was cold in spite of three layers and practiced balancing against the motion of the boat to stay warm. We ran the generator to keep the cabin warm so we could ward off the chill between watches.

Dawn arrived on Wednesday morning, and the wind died down to gale force, 35 to 45 knots. During the 17 hours we were hove to we had drifted about 50 miles back the way we had come. We were only about halfway to Hampton and the engine still wouldn’t start after changing the fuel filter and bleeding the fuel line. It was time to start sailing again. Sails sheeted in tight, we jibed slowly to a course of 210, close reaching but still a bit east of the bearing to Hampton. Hot oatmeal for breakfast revived the crew, and we were back up to our full complement of four, each taking a three hour watch. I was able to catch up on some much needed sleep and life returned to somewhat more normal for an offshore passage. We followed the wind shift to the northwest and we were able to sail through the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel as the sun was setting on Thursday afternoon. We were towed the final five miles to Blue Water Yachting Center in Hampton, VA, grateful to have arrived safely at our destination.

We were saddened to learn that the fate of the vessel and crew that had activated their EPIRB early Tuesday evening was not so positive. The vessel was a Swan 44 called Freefall that had been rolled and dismasted. The Coast Guard was able to rescue two people from the boat, but a third crew member lost his life. Phil Rubright from Detroit was a fellow member of the Great Lakes Singlehanded Society. We also heard of two additional vessels, a 67-footer and a 100-footer that remain missing. We agreed that we dealt with the situation as best we could. We monitored the forecast and were prepared for the approaching weather. We were uncomfortable, but never felt our lives were in danger, and we trusted our boat to keep us safe. We maintain a healthy respect for wind and water, but we will continue to head out to sea.
__________________
Gail
Personal boating blog:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #1575  
Old 10-27-2009
smackdaddy's Avatar
Last Man Standing
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 13,129
Thanks: 84
Thanked 78 Times in 72 Posts
Rep Power: 9
smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough
Wow - fantastic write-up Aerie.

Damn I love this thread. Best sailing stories - and sailors - on the net!

I remember the story of that Swan 44. Bad stuff. Didn't the skipper suffer a heart attack when he went into the water during the rescue?

Sounds like you guys did a phenomenal job of dealing with the conditions...and "going with the flow" instead of fighting it. I see it over and over - let the boat protect you...and have some oatmeal handy.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

S/V Dawn Treader - 1989 Hunter Legend 40
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #1576  
Old 10-27-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 107
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
imiloa is on a distinguished road
Thanks for the great story aerie. We learn something from each one. BTW, what was the problem with the engine?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #1577  
Old 10-27-2009
aerie's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Michigan
Posts: 70
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 15
aerie is on a distinguished road
You can believe that Phil Rubright's death was one of the topics of conversation during GLSS events on the Great Lakes this summer. All three of the crew of Freefall were injured in the rollover and dismasting, which survivors said was caused by a rogue wave. Phil was the most severly injured, and so he was the first person the USCG wanted to remove from the disabled vessel. Since they prefer to take people out of the water and not off a boat, Phil and a rescue swimmer were in the water, but the rescue swimmer was injured, breaking his arm and therefore couldn't assist. The helicopter deployed a liferaft which Phil was able to get into, but unfortunately he was not able to stay in it when it capsized and was not able to get back into it due to his injuries and weakness caused by hypothermia. The first helicopter returned to shore with their injured swimmer, and by the time a second one reached the disabled vessel, Phil had died. The other two crew were still on the boat, which was still floating, and were rescued. We estimated 20-foot waves where we were, and those were big enough. The USCG estimated the waves were 40 feet where this rescue took place. Definitely the safest place to be in conditions like that is inside a boat, even if disabled, as long as it's not sinking. Stay warm and dry, then call for rescue once the conditions improve if you're not able to get the boat moving yourself.

Check the following links for further information about the Swan 44 Freefall and the Coast Guard rescue:
http://lifefloatingby.blogspot.com/2008/10/coast-guard-rescues-2-mt-pleasant.html
Rescue Video from a Coast Guard C-130
FWB official's daughter injured in fatal sailing accident
__________________
Gail
Personal boating blog:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #1578  
Old 10-27-2009
aerie's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Michigan
Posts: 70
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 15
aerie is on a distinguished road
The engine problem turned out to be the timing belt being off by one sprocket. The engine had to be taken almost completely apart and rebuilt once we arrived in Hampton. After the repair, it ran as smooth as butter.
__________________
Gail
Personal boating blog:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #1579  
Old 10-27-2009
smackdaddy's Avatar
Last Man Standing
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 13,129
Thanks: 84
Thanked 78 Times in 72 Posts
Rep Power: 9
smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by aerie View Post
You can believe that Phil Rubright's death was one of the topics of conversation during GLSS events on the Great Lakes this summer. All three of the crew of Freefall were injured in the rollover and dismasting, which survivors said was caused by a rogue wave. Phil was the most severly injured, and so he was the first person the USCG wanted to remove from the disabled vessel. Since they prefer to take people out of the water and not off a boat, Phil and a rescue swimmer were in the water, but the rescue swimmer was injured, breaking his arm and therefore couldn't assist. The helicopter deployed a liferaft which Phil was able to get into, but unfortunately he was not able to stay in it when it capsized and was not able to get back into it due to his injuries and weakness caused by hypothermia. The first helicopter returned to shore with their injured swimmer, and by the time a second one reached the disabled vessel, Phil had died. The other two crew were still on the boat, which was still floating, and were rescued. We estimated 20-foot waves where we were, and those were big enough. The USCG estimated the waves were 40 feet where this rescue took place. Definitely the safest place to be in conditions like that is inside a boat, even if disabled, as long as it's not sinking. Stay warm and dry, then call for rescue once the conditions improve if you're not able to get the boat moving yourself.

Check the following links for further information about the Swan 44 Freefall and the Coast Guard rescue:
http://lifefloatingby.blogspot.com/2008/10/coast-guard-rescues-2-mt-pleasant.html
Rescue Video from a Coast Guard C-130
FWB official's daughter injured in fatal sailing accident
That's right. I'd forgotten about the injured swimmer. It sounds like your decision to stay closer to the Jersey shore to minimize fetch was a good call. I assume they were further out with those 40 footers?
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

S/V Dawn Treader - 1989 Hunter Legend 40
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #1580  
Old 10-27-2009
smackdaddy's Avatar
Last Man Standing
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 13,129
Thanks: 84
Thanked 78 Times in 72 Posts
Rep Power: 9
smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough
Oh hell yeah! Talk about fair winds and following seas!!!

(Thanks to AllThumbs for the heads-up)

__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

S/V Dawn Treader - 1989 Hunter Legend 40
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
luffs, Battens and Leech ? painters Gear & Maintenance 17 11-15-2009 04:56 PM
Sloop or Ketch? maxheadspace Boat Review and Purchase Forum 46 07-27-2007 02:56 PM
Sails on a Boat That I'm Looking At FritzN Gear & Maintenance 9 02-22-2007 11:42 AM
The Balance of Hull and Sails Steve Colgate Buying a Boat Articles 0 05-25-2000 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:48 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.