Big Freakin' Sails - Page 191 - SailNet Community
 509Likes
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1901 of 3268 Old 07-16-2010 Thread Starter
Last Man Standing
 
smackdaddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 16,063
Thanks: 191
Thanked 190 Times in 182 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Holy crap - check out Bubb2's G-G-Grandad's BFSs.

I think the Easties are definitely taking the Cup this year:


Quote:
Originally Posted by bubb2 View Post
LACK of experance never stoped my great ,great grandfather

Howard Blackburn (1859 – 1932) was a Gloucester, Massachusetts fisherman, born in Nova Scotia. Despite losing his fingers at sea in 1883, he prospered as a Gloucester businessman. Yearning for adventure, he twice sailed single-handed across the Atlantic Ocean, overcoming his disability and setting record times for the crossing.


Howard Blackburn was born in Nova Scotia in 1859. At the age of 18, he moved south to Massachusetts, seeking work as a fisherman, and became part of the Gloucester, Massachusetts fishing community.
Blackburn first rose to fame in 1883. While he was fishing on the schooner Grace L. Fears, a sudden winter storm caught him and a dorymate unprepared while they were in their banks dory, leaving them separated from the schooner. Blackburn began to row for shore, despite the loss of his mittens; he knew his hands would freeze, so he kept them in the hooked position that would allow him to row. He tried to save one hand with a sock and thus worsened his condition by freezing his toes and yet not being able to save his fingers. The crewmate gave up and laid down in the dory and died on the second day. Blackburn carried the body to shore for a proper grave.
After five days with virtually no food, water, or sleep, he made it to shore in Newfoundland; but his companion had died during the journey. Blackburn's hands were treated for frostbite, but could not be saved; he lost all his fingers, and many of his toes, and both thumbs to the first joint.
Blackburn returned to Gloucester a hero, and with the help of the town, managed to establish a successful saloon. Not content with this, he organised an expedition to the Klondike to join the gold rush; rather than go overland, he and his group sailed there, via Cape Horn. Howard, after a disagreement with his partners left the group in San Francisco after a short trip to Portland, Oregon to buy lumber to help finance the trip, and returned home never having panned for gold.
After the quest for gold failed, Blackburn turned his attention to a new challenge — to sail single-handed across the Atlantic Ocean. This had been done before, by Alfred "Centennial" Johnson in 1876, and Joshua Slocum had completed a single-handed circumnavigation in 1898; but for a man with no fingers to undertake such a voyage would be quite an accomplishment. He sailed from Gloucester in 1899, in the modified Gloucester Fishing Sloop, Great Western, and reached England after 62 days at sea.
Returning to Gloucester, Blackburn continued to prosper as a businessman; but he still hankered for adventure. In 1901, he sailed to Portugal in the twenty-five-foot Gloucester Fishing sloop Great Republic, making the trip in 39 days. In 1903 he again set out alone, this time in the sailing dory America, but was defeated by bad weather. Blackburn also circumnavigated the Eastern United States by going down the Mississippi River and back up the Eastern Seaboard. "Great Republic" may be seen at the Cape Ann Museum, in Gloucester.
Blackburn died in 1932; his funeral was attended by many of the people of Gloucester. He was buried in the Fishermen’s Rest section of Beechgrove Cemetery.

S/V Dawn Treader - 1989 Hunter Legend 40

Last edited by smackdaddy; 07-16-2010 at 02:48 PM.
smackdaddy is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #1902 of 3268 Old 07-16-2010
Moderator
 
Jeff_H's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Annapolis, Md
Posts: 7,201
Thanks: 6
Thanked 195 Times in 159 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Those early singlehanders were really amazing guys. Bubb's quote mentions Alfred "Centenial" Johnson. Alfred Johnson was the first known man to do a single-handed transatlantic passage. He crossed from Gloucester, Mass to Liverpool in an open 20 foot dory, capsizing in a storm and still making it.

Quoting from Wikipedia, " When asked late in life why he had done it, he said "I made that trip because I was a damned fool, just as they said I was." Johnson's voyage was the first recorded single-handed crossing of the Atlantic, and perhaps the first major single-handed passage carried out in the spirit of adventure."

Then there was William Albert Andrews. (I aplogize for quoting from Wikipedia but I am a bit short of time), "William Albert Andrews of Beverley, Massachusetts, made several significant single-handed voyages, and instigated the first single-handed trans-Atlantic race. Andrews first crossed the Atlantic with his brother in a 19-foot (6 m) dory in 1878. He made an aborted attempt at a single-handed crossing in 1888, and then in 1891 he issued a challenge to any single-hander to race him across the ocean for a prize of $5,000. Josiah W. Lawlor, the son of a famous boat-builder, took up the challenge, and the two men built 15-foot (5 m) boats for the race. They set off from Crescent Beach near Boston on June 21, 1891. Andrews, in a highly unseaworthy boat, capsized several times and was finally picked up by a steamer; but Lawlor arrived at Coverack, Cornwall, on August 5, 1891."

But probably the closest to Ronnie of his day is Alain Gerbault who in the 1930's sailed a beat up old racing cutter, "Firecrest" across the Atlantic. Gerbault's was the classic "how not to do it" story, arriving in New York with no food or water and nearly totally destroyed sails. Yet, for all his goofiness, his was a hero's welcome in New York. He eventually did a circumnavigation and then spent the end of his life batting around the Pacific only to die in a Japanese internment camp during WWII, BFS indeed....


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Curmudgeon at Large- and rhinestone in the rough, sailing my Farr 11.6 on the Chesapeake Bay

Last edited by Jeff_H; 07-16-2010 at 03:42 PM.
Jeff_H is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #1903 of 3268 Old 07-16-2010 Thread Starter
Last Man Standing
 
smackdaddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 16,063
Thanks: 191
Thanked 190 Times in 182 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H View Post
Quoting from Wikipedia, " When asked late in life why he had done it, he said "I made that trip because I was a damned fool, just as they said I was." Johnson's voyage was the first recorded single-handed crossing of the Atlantic, and perhaps the first major single-handed passage carried out in the spirit of adventure."
BFS indeed....

S/V Dawn Treader - 1989 Hunter Legend 40
smackdaddy is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #1904 of 3268 Old 07-25-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: New York
Posts: 5,856
Thanks: 0
Thanked 18 Times in 17 Posts
Rep Power: 16
     
I am a lucky Man

As many of you know I have had a health problem that has limited my sailing.

Well I went sailing today. Was out from 7pm to all most midnight. This is because I have a Lvad (heart pump) that maintains a constant speed and does not compensate for the heat of the day, and it has been hot here for the whole month of July.

This evening brought gusts into the mid 20's and the boat was returning mid to high 7's. I was very happy with the way the boat was preforming and was enjoying myself.

The lucky part was, My 13 year old son took me sailing. He handled every thing on the boat by himself. From backing out of the slip to raising sails to sail trim and keeping the boat on course like it was on a rail. I could not have been more proud of the way my son was handling the boat.

When it came time to come back into the marina he asked me to take the wheel and point her into the wind so he could bring the Main sail down and pack into the stack pack. We were in irons and he was on the cabin top bringing down the sail when he saw that I was having trouble starting the Yanmar. I keep pushing the button but nothing was happening. I told my son we have a problem. He said Dad you may want to turn the key on.

I told him thank you for taking me sailing. He said. Dad I needed the practice, we have a big sail coming up at the end of Aug. Which we do! I don't think it is going to long before he asks for the keys to take the boat out alone.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Never Forgotten

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by bubb2; 07-25-2010 at 11:45 PM.
bubb2 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #1905 of 3268 Old 07-25-2010
..........huh?..
 
Izzy1414's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Grants Pass,OR
Posts: 395
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Now that is a sweet BFS, Bubb. Good on you two!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by bubb2 View Post
I don't think it is going to long before he asks for the keys to take the boat out alone.
Sounds like it might be smart to put him in charge of the keys anyway!

S/V Boccata d'Aria

I'm not sure what Dickens are, but I think they may be important and I sure as hell don't want them scared out of me.......Izzy
Izzy1414 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #1906 of 3268 Old 07-26-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 627
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 16
 
Chesapeake Bay Sun, 7/25

Okay, I've pretty much ignored this thread b/c, well I just didn't care. Even though I've done a few "BFS". Just never thought I needed to talk about them.

Yesterday however we were out in the club's C320 w/ another couple (she had never sailed, he only a couple of times) and it was a nice day, wind filled in to 12,13 knots. We were south of Chesapeake Beach and could see a dark cloud over Herrington Harbor South so I said let's just go back down south a mile or so and hang until it blows across the Bay. Well, it got a little darker and darker and then about 20 min. later some chick got on Ch16 and started SCREAMING almost incoherently about MAYDAY, Bad storm, HHS. With 60 seconds you could see the squall coming down the bay and it was on us. We were on Stbd heading NW at the time and we got blown down rail under. Struggled to get control of the jib, dropped the main enough to get the reef in, started the engine. Took some doing but we FINALLY tacked which made me feel a lot better b/c now I had lots of sea room and new the squall would blow over long before we'd get blown across the Bay.

Thing was this storm moved NW to SSE; not typical of most squalls we see here. I watched the replay on the weather when we got home.

Then the main ripped about half way up from the leech about 4-5' fwd toward the luff. I just ignored it and kept forereaching w/ the small amount of jib and 2K rpms on the engine. Found the GPS and it said we were doing just over 2 knots. Okay, so this is cool and other than the occasional REALLY big wave (6') that knocked us it wasn't too bad. Water was bathwater warm. GF got the lifejackets out for everyone and my gloves which was too little too late as my hands already had burns on them (ouch, they hurt today!) and took the wheel when I needed to do something.

To their credit the young couple w/ us didn't freak out, he even thought it was COOL! After 40 min. it blew through and we motorsailed in. A couple of other boats were going in also. One of them said he saw 52 knot gusts.
I asked the (nervous wreck looking) woman on a SAILTIME boat that was tying up what she saw; she said 45 and quit looking after that!

Shoot we were the smallest boat out there of the boats I saw afterwards.
Not something I WANT to repeat but it wasn't terrible. Cleaned up the mess below from stuff getting thrown and the residue of GF's lunch and it was all good. (First time she's ever puked w/ me. ) Untangled the jib sheets which had knotted themselves a bit. Took the sail off to see if it's repairable or not. IT was due to be replaced this winter so I'm not upset about that. Just kicking myself for not checking the weather while we were out there. But then hot summer days ALWAYS have the possibility of T'storms.

Pisser was Thomas Point Light, just 12-14 miles north never got it. I checked and the highest they had was gust to 16. WTH?

Cove point to the south had gusts in the mid 40's.
Us? We got the brunt of it all.
It's all good. And the other couple thought it was fun.
sailordave is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #1907 of 3268 Old 07-26-2010 Thread Starter
Last Man Standing
 
smackdaddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 16,063
Thanks: 191
Thanked 190 Times in 182 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Bubb - that was freakin' awesome! Seriously. You're are indeed a lucky man. Tell Michael hi for us.

Dave - sweet BFS dude! Especially like the bonding moment over the "hurl". Nice. See - it's all good!

Seems to be quite a few good storm stories out there right now. Bring 'em on over...or I will!

S/V Dawn Treader - 1989 Hunter Legend 40
smackdaddy is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #1908 of 3268 Old 07-26-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 627
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 16
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
Dave - sweet BFS dude! Especially like the bonding moment over the "hurl". Nice. See - it's all good!
There was no BONDING to it. She cleaned it all up! I was busy topsides.
Found out afterwards that she had also tossed breakfast about 10 min. after lunch went but that was over the leeward rail while I was up fwd untying the mess of a jib sheet.
sailordave is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #1909 of 3268 Old 07-26-2010
ancient mariner
 
captbillc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: duluth ,minnesota
Posts: 439
Thanks: 1
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
bubb2-------that's a great story! a son to be proud of !

Liberals are people who care about others. Freethinkers are not constrained by the myths of religion.
captbillc is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #1910 of 3268 Old 07-30-2010
Senior Member
 
MarioG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 405
Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Hey Bubba sounds like you have a fine young man there, my hat is off to him.
MarioG is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
luffs, Battens and Leech ? painters Gear & Maintenance 17 11-15-2009 04:56 PM
Sloop or Ketch? maxheadspace Boat Review and Purchase Forum 46 07-27-2007 02:56 PM
Sails on a Boat That I'm Looking At FritzN Gear & Maintenance 9 02-22-2007 11:42 AM
The Balance of Hull and Sails Steve Colgate Buying a Boat Articles 0 05-25-2000 08:00 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome