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  #461  
Old 10-08-2008
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Does your boat also have a windshield?
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  #462  
Old 10-08-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailortjk1 View Post
Does your boat also have a windshield?
With wipers and a defroster!
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  #463  
Old 10-08-2008
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chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough
Draft is 18 inches with Rudders and Center boards up, one asymmetrical board (a pie shape, curved depending on which hull) in each hull, with Rudder down, about 30 inches - they pop up. With boards fully down 5.5 feet. I can motor in 20 inches (drive leg down, rudders up) and sail in 18 inches (rudders and boards up). The rudders do steer the boat when up with about e sq feet of submerged surface area, and the motor steers 30 degrees left and right with the rudders. Boards are raised/lowered with a winch handle, takes about 10 seconds, 1.5 turns of the handle up, 1.5 turns down.

I single hand with both down, lose about .5 kts, but easier.

I make about 3 degrees to leeward at 10 knts - measured, not guessed, and yes, I know how to calculate it (drag a string, shoot a compass).

I can make 35 degrees off the wind with the screacher pulled (the tack is on a curved track on the bow) to leeward - typically at about 2/3 of wind speed, measured, not guessed (4kts in 6 kts last time I checked).
Jib's good to 45 degrees off wind, and I don't need to back the jib on a tack unless it's light air.


Yes, it has a windshield. I can stand at the helm and see 90% of what's around me.

No - saltwater and wipers are stupid, you just get smears. I have had water over the bow and up and over the pilot house - nasty chop and PB wakes suck on the bay.
Here I'm pulling into the boat ramp at Cape St Claire, depth 3 feet, step son on the bow - the week I bought it last year. Deep Creek Restaurant in the background. My slip is 100 feet away, 300 feet to the left of the restaurant in the picture - same side of the creek.
I live two blocks from the boat ramp, opposite side of the creek from my slip
Big Freakin' Sails-backing-off-pier.jpg
I really kind of like it. Check it out at this years boat show, Gemini 105Mc by Performance Cruising Inc, tell 'em hull 987 sent you

Afterwards, PM me, we'll go sailing on Columbus day (next monday) I'm off and the looking for crew. PM me if interested.

Last edited by chucklesR; 10-08-2008 at 10:50 PM. Reason: added photo
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  #464  
Old 10-08-2008
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chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by painkiller View Post
Is that a Lev-O-Gauge above your door??????? Is it there for nostalgia?
It's my own install.
It's there for the 'eek factor' or pucker factor.

Builder recommended limit is 7 degrees heel.
It does heel, it's a skinny cat at 14 feet beam.

At about 18 degrees a hull is flying, at 80+ it's going over unless you seriously paid off the right deity.


For nostalgia I have a brass hat hanger and bottle opener shaped like an anchor. For sanity, I have a lev-o-gauge.
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  #465  
Old 10-08-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
Genie - welcome! And great point about the various names for the spinnaker - aka..."asymmetrical investment", "hood ornament" or my favorite "mistake". Are you an anthropologist (social or other)?

And, hey, your tales fit in here just as much as anyone else's - racer or cruiser. Doesn't matter at all. This isn't an exclusive club, dude - though some wanted to make it that at some point. It's kind of like the UN of big sailing. As pointed out then, it's purely about pushing limits. So how about one of those BFS's?

Good to have you.
No, I am not an anthropologist - though I've read on the subject - I'm just a broken down, old sailing ex-sculptor.

It doesn't take much encouragement to get the sea stories started.

You might be interested in seeing my blog from the 2005 Transatlantic race. Some of you might have seen the Discovery channel documentary about that race, with Gary Jobson as the director/narrator. I was on the Staad Amsterdam with him - a 250 ft square rigged three masted ship - and I must say that for someone used to sailing fore and aft rigged, small (by comparison) boats it was a heck of a trip. Unfortunately my camera was not working and I didn't know it so I have no picture of my own on the site and only have a few photos supplied by the ship's staff and the official race photographer. Still, I think it's an interesting read (of course I would, I wrote it). Go to Claudiomarzollo.com and click on the Transatlantic race link.

Back to BFS. Back in the sixties there was a race held on Long Island Sound that was run in late October and although it had a formal name, which I now forget, it was generally referred to as "the Gearbuster", with good reason. I never sailed that race without breaking something. Those late Oct winds are usually quite different from the August calms of the area. It was a late evening start at the western end of the sound and went to the Stratford Shoals lighthouse and back. By the time it got dark (moonless, of course) the wind had picked up as we sailed along the Connecticut shore in a SW wind. We were racing, so we kept the chute up and never saw the squall till it hit us.

I have no idea how hard it blew since when it hit it not only knocked us down but also somehow managed to impale the head of the chute over the top of the mast, thus removing our anemometer and all the antennas. With the chute thusly impaled it was impossible to bring it down or muzzle it (this was in the era before spinnaker socks, though a sock would have been above the impaling mast, making it useless). We let go the spinnaker guy and by pulling the sheet in were able to bring the sail somewhat into the lee of the main. The runaway spinnaker was still seriously heeling us but refusing to disintergrate and the Connecticut shore was getting closer and closer. The possibility of starting the engine was never seriously discussed (we were racing and fully intended to finish the race, no DNF allowed) and anyway with that much sail up and the puny two bladed fixed props raceboats had in those days I doubt it would have done any good.

Next thing I know - I have a stupid habit of volunteering at the wrong time - I'm in the boatsun chair going up the mast with my trusty knife. It was actually pretty easy at the beginning because as long as I was between the forward and after lower shrouds I was able to simply walk up the mast due to the extreme angle of heel. The upper part of the mast was harder but I had a line going down from me to the deck so that if I lost the grip on the mast my belayer would be able to keep me from either going into the water or banging into the mast. Once I got to the masthead the tricky part was making sure I was cutting the spinnaker and not the halyard I was on. I never did get close to the water while up there so I guess the salty liquid in my seaboots must have come from a different source.

Now, I know the safety police are going to be all over this one. What were we doing carrying a big spinnaker in those conditions, why was I even allowed to go up a mast in the dark while the boat was bouncing like a bucking bronco, why was no one wearing pfd's or harnesses - oh, did I forget to mention that? I was young and stupid and like all young men, I felt immortal. I didn't even realize the biggest danger was not the obvious one of getting loose from the mast and bouncing around, the biggest danger was
that the shaking of the loose chute and my added weight aloft would tear the shrouds, headstay or backstay out of the boat or cause a fitting to fail, toppling the rig, along with me, over the side.

Obviously that didn't happen, or I wouldn't be telling the tale. Am I happier with more modern safety procedures? Of course. On my boat now I carry state of the art inflatable pfd's and harnesses, rig jacklines and sail much, much more conservatively, since I'm not racing. Everyone uses the gear at night or when it blows, though I don't make wearing it mandatory in gentler conditions. And I'll probably be a scofflaw when pfd's are required at all times, as they are now on many races.

I should look back at that incident with horror, thankful the worst case scenario didn't play out, I would certainly be horrified if one of my grown sons did something like it, I'm glad my parents never heard about it (I was single at the time).

yet.....

More than forty years later I remember it vividly, and still feel a thrill in the memory and until I lose all memory I will never forget it. Was it worth the risk? Probably not. I certainly wouldn't trade the last 40+ years of my life for the memory, but I'm still glad I have it. There is a certain guilty pleasure in that.
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  #466  
Old 10-08-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by genieskip
Now, I know the safety police are going to be all over this one.
Probably ....but if you dont have any pictures from up there... then it never happened though and you'll be OK.........
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  #467  
Old 10-08-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stillraining View Post
Probably ....but if you dont have any pictures from up there... then it never happened though and you'll be OK.........
It was dark - and flash pictures are not allowed on boats at night. Kills the night vision.
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  #468  
Old 10-08-2008
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smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough
Genie - holy crap. That was one fine BFS, dude. Photos be damned, you had urine in your boots, man! What do these Visigoths expect? Apart from throwing down a great freakin' story - I just want to thank you for saving us from the trimaran lovefest. I was dyin' here. And don't worry, the safety police will be along shortly, I'm sure. At which time you can just dump the contents of your seaboots on them for all I care. I'll look into that 2005 TA race. I'd love to see the doc. Now, something tells me that since you've been sailing since the world was flat you probably have more. So keep 'em coming!

Still!!! Welcome back, man! I'm tellin' ya, screw the photo-edict! That's ancient history, dude! Did you go out in the stuff yesterday? How was it?
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  #469  
Old 10-08-2008
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Chuckles - unlike Charlie I notice that you chose to forego the pfd for your step son. Anything we should read into that? Oh wait - pfds are only needed on boats where danger happens - that's right. My bad.

Hey, anyone know the formula for calculating how big waves can get in a 50 knot blow and 18" of water? Heh-heh.

PS - Chuckles, I'm telling PB you said his wakes suck.

Last edited by smackdaddy; 10-09-2008 at 12:16 AM.
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  #470  
Old 10-09-2008
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sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieCobra View Post
It depends on the boat. If on the V-21 it would be anything North of 30 knots. On Oh Joy, anything above 50 in the Sound. On the Pacific? I don't know yet as I haven't taken either boat out of the Sound yet.

Smack, the difference between a nautical mile and a standard mile is this:

Mile = 5280 feet
NM = 6000 feet
A nautical mile is 6076 feet.
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