Big Freakin' Sails - Page 87 - SailNet Community
 407Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #861 of 3091 Old 12-10-2008
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: New York
Posts: 5,829
Thanks: 0
Thanked 18 Times in 17 Posts
Rep Power: 15
     
Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
Bubb - SWEET video! Man that looks fun. How fast do you think those guys are going? They look like their cranking. Maybe even as fast as Giu!
Smack, the open 70's can reach close to 30 knots and maintain 20+. What gets me is the wakes these boats throw and the lines the drivers hold in the seas they are sailing in.. (straight as an arrow) It is poetry in motion!!!
bubb2 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #862 of 3091 Old 12-10-2008 Thread Starter
Last Man Standing
 
smackdaddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 14,572
Thanks: 153
Thanked 149 Times in 142 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bene505 View Post
Those guys are cranking! It's humbling to think what BFS means to some people.
Yeah! But that's what makes it so freakin' cool! The "BFS Continuum" - it's ALWAYS big to each sailor 'til they've been through it a few times - then they get confident and are hit by something bigger and wet their foulies! All the while, there are still others out there that think those same conditions are not all that scary. And so on.

You gotta LOVE sailing, man!
smackdaddy is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #863 of 3091 Old 12-10-2008 Thread Starter
Last Man Standing
 
smackdaddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 14,572
Thanks: 153
Thanked 149 Times in 142 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Quote:
Originally Posted by bubb2 View Post
Smack, the open 70's can reach close to 30 knots and maintain 20+. What gets me is the wakes these boats throw and the lines the drivers hold in the seas they are sailing in.. (straight as an arrow) It is poetry in motion!!!
Bubb, you should really go check out the interactive map at the Vendee site. It's interesting to see the "flocking" of the boats as they round the Cape - and the way they hold similar lines. BTW - one of them was dismasted this morning. Ouch.

Still poetry.
smackdaddy is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #864 of 3091 Old 12-11-2008 Thread Starter
Last Man Standing
 
smackdaddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 14,572
Thanks: 153
Thanked 149 Times in 142 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
HOLY CRAP! I just stumbled across an INSANE BFS...in the Cruiser forum no less! It was so good, it even had Giu crying' MDB before there was MDB. Of course, the evidence then came out and quieted the crowd...

I call this Eastie the "Big Kahuner" - check out his mojo:

Quote:
Originally Posted by sgkuhner View Post
In 1974 my wife, Kitty, and I were sailing from St Thomas to New York in July. We were completing a three year circumnavigation in our 30 foot Allied Seawind Ketch. Half way between Hatteras and Bermuda, we got hit by a hurricane and at 0200 July 14, while lying ahull in 85 kts of wind, a huge wave came and we fell off the top of it. When we hit the water it seemed as though the whole boat exploded. Actually the main hatch was blown off, as were the teak grab rails on the cabin top, the spray dodger, the wind-vane self-steering device and the stanchions on the lee side were flattened against the cabin top. When we righted, the water was up to the level of the bunks. Luckily we had the most efficient bilge pump in the world, ...a frightened woman with a bucket! While Kitty got us bailed dry, I bolted a piece of plywood over the companionway hatch opening. There was no time to even think about how much peril we were in. We just did what we had to and by 1100 the next day the wind was down to a mere 35 kts.

First, we always keep our life raft on the floor in the cockpit and have a piece of plywood supported by fids fastened to either side of the cockpit well jut below the sail locker hatches. Had the life raft been kept on deck it would have been torn off the cabin top by the force of the water. It was that piece of plywood we used to cover the companionway hatch that was ripped off.

The main boom, which had been sheeted tight to the mizzen mast, was severely bent. Using a block and tackle secured to the toe-rail and the boom we were able to almost straighten it out. By 1200 (the knockdown was at 0200) the wind was down to 35 kts and we were able to set a storm jib, a reefed main and the mizzen. (I believe that we did not lose the rig because we had re-rigged in New Zealand with galvanized rigging three sizes larger than what was on there as it was the only wire available at the time)

With that rig we sailed into New York harbor and after cleaning up the engine, I was able to get it started (the engine was an 18 hp Albin diesel that I could hand crank) to get through Hells gate and around to City Island. The next day we sailed to Westport CT our home port and spent the rest of the summer fixing our 30 foot Allied Seawind Ketch "Bebinka" and in the fall we sailed her back to St Thomas to spend another winter in the Caribbean. Below (if I have figured out how to do this, I have posted a picture of what the interior looked like the morning after the knockdown


Here is what the deck looked like after the knockdown.
Easties - if this doesn't give you guys a big push for the Cup - nothing else will!
smackdaddy is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #865 of 3091 Old 12-15-2008
Senior Member
 
johnshasteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 652
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
 
Okay SmackDaddy, here's Paloma's BFS adventure. Pictures of her back in port, go to the photo gallery and search Paloma.
Thursday March 06, 2008, three of us, all seasoned blue water sailors sailed Paloma, my Bristol 29.9, out of Port Isabel and around the bottom of South Padre Island, just North of the Rio Grande River and the Mexican border, laying for Freeport about 250 miles to the ENE. It was the perfect sailing weather - we were in shorts and polo shirts, on a broad reach in 15 knot SE winds, beautiful 5-7 foot seas and 70 degree weather - the only thing missing was a Jimmy Buffett CD on the stereo.
Later in the day we got a Coast Guard weather alert, small craft immediately make for the nearest port, there was a Northerly cold front (the one that dumped all the snow in mid-west mid-week) moving our way at 35 miles per hour packing internal winds of 50-60, gusting higher, seas quickly building to over 20 feet. Paloma is a not a small craft, but a second-generation
Bristol, built and equipped to go anywhere in any weather, and since the weather report was coming from Coast Guard South Padre Island, we thought we could head more easterly and possibly get on the other side of al least the brunt of the storm. No such luck, around 6:30pm we got hit full force by the front, coming like a freight train. It slammed us from a 15 degree heel to port through a 100 degree arc, down to starboard port lights in the water all the way up to the handrails and the sails in the water before we rounded up into the wind and could start the engine and start dropping sail. On the initial hit, the main, still dumping water, hung up in the spreaders and tore, at the same time we lost cotter pins on the port and starboard upper stays and we couldn't haul the main more than about 3/4 of the way down. Then as bad luck and Murphy’s Law would have it, a jib sheet got of control and went under the boat, tangling in the prop, stopping the engine. Now came the decisions not in the "game plan".
We made the only possible decision, to turn south and run bare poles before the storm. From the point we turned, about 35-40 miles NE of the
Rio Grande, we screamed down wind in what we thought were 18 - 20 foot following seas (later the Coast Guard told us they were 28 - 30 feet) and winds 50-60 and gusting over 60 ( a Force 10 storm, precisely as promised by the Coast Guard) for 36 hours. The stern and bimini were plenty of sail and it was a wild ride being pushed along by the seas, hitting over 10mph (from the GPS) when sliding down the face of the seas. It was a strain to keep Paloma tracking, so we couldn't stay on the helm more than an hour at a time and we knew if we turned beam to the wind, we would likely broach. When anyone went below for an all too short, one-hour rest, they could only nap on the cabin sole - even that was comfortable after two hours in the cockpit. The winds were cold, but when waves broke into the cockpit, the water was warm. We kept wondering when the storm would abate - actually we just kept wondering if we were going to end up in Vera Cruz.
When the winds finally abated and shifted back to SE, we were about 135 miles down and 70 miles east of the Mexican coastline - we had been blown 180 miles off our original rhumb line, no engine and only a 110 working jib. During the short calm of the wind shift, we untangled the line around the prop, by starting the engine in neutral then putting the engine in reverse and pulling like crazy on the line trying to unwind it - after two tries, thank goodness it worked. We now had a working jib and an engine (if we needed it) - not a bad combination to turn and run North in what ended up being a much more comfortable 15-20 knot SE winds and 8-10 foot seas - still a chore to keep her on track with only a working jib and making hull speed and better when shoved by the following seas, but easily manageable.
The closest ffice:smarttags" />US landfall was
lace w:st="on">South Padre Islandlace> about 135 miles NNW and by mid-day Sunday we were in sight of the buildings on the island.fficeffice" />>>

s/v Paloma, Bristol 29.9, #141
Slipped in Bahia Marina, easy access to Corpus Christi Bay and the Gulf of Mexico.
johnshasteen is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #866 of 3091 Old 12-15-2008 Thread Starter
Last Man Standing
 
smackdaddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 14,572
Thanks: 153
Thanked 149 Times in 142 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Dude, you just put the Gulfies on the freakin' map! And if you ever need crew - let me know. I could learn a lot from you. And it would be well worth the drive from Austin. No doubt.

Great BFS, John!
smackdaddy is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #867 of 3091 Old 12-20-2008
.
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 10,851
Thanks: 0
Thanked 5 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 13
         


Giulietta is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #868 of 3091 Old 12-20-2008
Glad I found Sailnet
 
Bene505's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 3,818
Thanks: 14
Thanked 51 Times in 50 Posts
Rep Power: 9
   
Very nice Giu. You are keeping this thread alive in December. Wait, aren't you in Wisconsin?
Bene505 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #869 of 3091 Old 12-20-2008
Tartan 37C
 
T37SOLARE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Chesapeake Bay - HHS
Posts: 501
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bene505 View Post
Very nice Giu. You are keeping this thread alive in December. Wait, aren't you in Wisconsin?
After much deliberation and thought, Alex has decided to relocate his family and the s/v Giuettea to Montana so they too can enjoy the delightful thing we here call Winter.

After maybe a week or two of this winter thing they too will come to the conclusion that WINTER SUCKS


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

SOLARE
T-37 #442
T37SOLARE is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #870 of 3091 Old 12-24-2008
Senior Member
 
johnshasteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 652
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
 
Feliz Navidad y Feliz Ao Nuevo. It's Christmas Eve and a balmy 75 degrees down here in Corpus Christi.

s/v Paloma, Bristol 29.9, #141
Slipped in Bahia Marina, easy access to Corpus Christi Bay and the Gulf of Mexico.
johnshasteen is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
luffs, Battens and Leech ? painters Gear & Maintenance 17 11-15-2009 04:56 PM
Sloop or Ketch? maxheadspace Boat Review and Purchase Forum 46 07-27-2007 02:56 PM
Sails on a Boat That I'm Looking At FritzN Gear & Maintenance 9 02-22-2007 11:42 AM
The Balance of Hull and Sails Steve Colgate Buying a Boat Articles 0 05-25-2000 08:00 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome