My Wife is no longer allowed on our boat,.... - SailNet Community

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  #1  
Old 09-22-2008
DrB DrB is offline
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My Wife is no longer allowed on our boat,....

well at least allowed to operate the motor.

Last year we were approaching our mooring. We were about 100 yards away from it and I yell back, to start to throttle down. The boat keeps moving forward at about 3 kts, so I yell back again to throttle down to which she yells forward while waving the now broken off throttle lever, "I can't". I madly dash down below to pull out a pair of vise grips and manage to use them to reduce the motor to crawl so that we can park the boat. I had about 5 boat length to spare.

A few weeks ago, the same thing happened, but this time we had no urgency, she was just throttling up going out of the harbor. I talked to the Yanmar guy and he says that shearing of the throttle bolt probably means the cable is stiff and should either be replaced or lubed. The lever should move easily, but have some resistance. Ours is somewhat stiff.

Yesterday, we are out of the harbor, sails are up and we are sailing. The Admiral shuts down the motor and then says, "Uh oh". I look back, thinking that she has sheared the key off in the ignition. Better, as she removed the key, we hit a wave and she braced against the engine control panel, her hand slipped and her palm sheared off the cap that holds in the ignition switch. The whole ignition switch is now in pieces and they are everywhere.

I get back and repiece everything together, but it won't stay together. Basically there is one piece that needs be twisted correctly to get the engine to start. We test it and the engine refires, so that is good. Managed to work when we had to motor back to the harbor due to no wind, but now I need to install a new switch.

DrB

Last edited by DrB; 09-22-2008 at 04:24 PM.
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Old 09-22-2008
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For better or for worse, in the cockpit or the cabin, 'til someone goes overboard.
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Old 09-22-2008
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And we have the temerity to call them the weaker sex!!
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Old 09-22-2008
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Get one of the new Teleflex Teflon cables, that'll cure the stiffness issue.
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Old 09-22-2008
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Hmm if that had been my vessel

the status and state of the equipement is my issue/fault, not my admiral's

sounds like some upgrading is in order

oh well -- perhaps the treasury department will allow that to happen...:
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Old 09-22-2008
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Rum

Suggests ONE of you...Prefably yourself.Start drinking BEFORE you leave port.Then drink the PORT.

Hand the Addmiral the tool bag and suffer while you do the home chores.More RUM is required at this point.

She will eather become more tender fingered...or you will become a rummy!

Enjoy
M
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Old 09-22-2008
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This is exactly why the word unbreakable is so important. Once you fix everything to that extent then you are ready for bluewater hurricane sailing or the making of the second Waterworld movie. Stainless, titanium, carbon grafite...kevlar, delrin...I can see it now. But she should get the ultimate credits!
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Old 09-22-2008
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HEHE!

I remember this story, which I will paraphrase most of, about this guy that had spent some tens of thousands and 6 months rebuilding his dream boat. Dropped her in the water. On the maiden cruise, to go get some gas, was throttling through the fairway (at a nice little clip), went to throw it in reverse, and the handle popped off in his hand. The dock master and others were screaming until they jumped off the gas dock - which he suceeded in taking out completely. Boat did not sink, but it was another XX months before she was ready to go again.

Quite funny to hear him narrrate it. Sorry, your story reminded me of that. And remember, a bad day on the water is better than a good day in the office. Keep her around. It will always give you someone to blame when you, I mean... errr, she makes a critical navigation error and you spend most of the night on a sand bar. Not that it has ever happened to me, mind you...

- CD
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Old 09-22-2008
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Your wife is just trying to help on the boat. Sounds like the throttle and ignition mechanisms are too fragile. Fix the boat, and quit blaming her.

Eric
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Old 09-22-2008
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Here you go, Doc. This is from the Sailnet Classics. It will put you in a better mood and give you a great laugh by which to forget your troubles. I posted one of my favorite below. To view all of them, go here: http://www.sailnet.com/forums/off-to...lassics-3.html

A Classic...

Due to work committments, etc., I hadn''t been able to get down to my boat in awhile. This last weekend my brother was visiting so I invited him to go sailing with me. When we arrived at the slip, I went down below and found a huge active mud-dobbers nest by my fold up bulkhead mounted table. After obtaining some of the 20 ft.reach hornet spray, I doused them good, and they dropped as soon as the stuff hit''em.I started gathering up the carcasses and then noticed a hornet flying behind my vhf. I peered around it carefully and found a hornets nest the size of your open hand with about 30 of the little buggers peering back at me licking their chops! They were the bad-ass type, with attitude. I went up on deck, leaned in the companionway and doused them real good. Unlike the mud-dobbers dropping immediately, the spray seemed to just piss the hornets off. They came out with a vengeance. After what seemed like an eternity of swatting, dodging, and spraying, the enemy retreated. I felt good about the defense my brother and I had put up and the fact that we had prevailed. There wasn’t any wind, so I suggested to my brother that we motor down to a little restaurant about 1 mile away and get some lunch. After we had been underway for awhile, I went down below to get a cold drink. I peered around the vhf again to make sure there weren’t any hornets regrouping for a second attack. Sure enough, there were about 8 or so of the little devils bug eyeing me and rubbing their legs together like they do. They knew I had the “weapon of mass destruction.” I sprayed them again and they came out looking for their pound of flesh! My brother was at the wheel and they went after him first. Obviously their strategy was to take out the wheel man, which would create a diversion for the following full out assault. As my brother was swatting at them, he was jerking the wheel this way and that, which was tossing me about. I was going down, but continued firing off rounds with the “weapon of mass destruction.”. Bodies of the enemy lay about the cockpit. The battle eventually subsided, and all was calm again. The lesson learned? Never spray a hornets nest while under way boss! There’s no where to run!!!.
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