paranoid about getting seasick - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 08-27-2002
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 44
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
bullseye is on a distinguished road
paranoid about getting seasick

im hoping to do some coastal cruising soon,maybe onboard for a few days at a time,my main concern is seasickness.
ill be spewing (literally) if i get it,i know prevention is better than cure & maybe taking some drugs as soon as u feel you may be getting seasick helps.

ive never been seasick before on day trips outside,but will being onboard for a few days at a time be different?

what preventions do you take?

thank-you,
Bullseye
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 08-27-2002
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,120
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 13
WHOOSH is on a distinguished road
paranoid about getting seasick

Bulleye:

Seasickness and its treatment is so individual a thing; it''s hard to generalize...but here goes.

Longer at-sea times will likely invite more opportunity for seasickness simply due to exposure (wind/sea changes over time). Moreover, fatigue is one contributor and you''ll find the worst of both world''s during the first few days of a passage: fatigue sets in but the body may need longer to adapt to the motion. But...then again, you may experience no susceptibility.

I''m going to mention this ''remedy'' simply because I don''t see it discussed often and have quite a bit of experience with it now. I''m referring to the Relief Bands now being sold by WM among others. (This is intended to generate an adjustable electrical impulse on the underside of your wrist, supposedly at a sensitive point that influences nausea, what the Chinese have called the ''nei kuan'' point).

This was recommended to us by fellow GA pilots originally (pilots of small planes can rival sailors for experiencing motion sickness and crushed recreational plans after a big investment in their vessel!) and we initially bought one to test while on the Chesapeake. In one blow, my wife became ill, put on the new Relief Band, and felt immensely better in 10 mins. She was amazed. Then it was my turn to begin feeling badly, she passed over the band, and I was subsequently doing chart work at the nav table feeling fine. We were pretty impressed.

Then they came out with the replaceable battery model, which we took with us when leaving for the Caribbean. We (essentially, just my wife; I''ve used it only one add''l time) used them for 1.5 years. FWIW here are our conclusions about remedies & Relief Bands:
1. Nothing works in an absolute fashion and, after much reviewing of NASA research, a lot of careful trials with various drugs and ginger-type stuff, we consider ourselves pretty knowledgeable about what does/doesn''t work *for us*. (The NASA research proved conslusively that treatment of spatial disorientation is not linear, meaning we each react uniquely to the various drugs used).
2. Despite #1, the most widely effective pharmaceutical treatment (often used on school ships but with a Doc prescribing it via SSB) is the ''NASA Cocktail'' originally discovered by accident by NASA - a 25 mg dosage of Promethazine and Ephidrine.
3. The Relief Bands aren''t a guaranteed fix and it''s a financial leap of faith to buy one, hoping it will work. Despite that, we recommend them because they worked well for us (my wife is quite susceptible to seasickness) and because they do not interfere with any other type of treatment you might be considering (patch, drug, homeopathic, breathing exercises, etc.). Besides, given the investment in our boats and the importance in actually being able to enjoy being at sea, surely a trial run with a non-replacement type Relief Band isn''t THAT much of a leap.

One last thought: Consider carrying a suppository (either OTC drug of choice or Promethazine with Doc''s prescription) as once you begin throwing up, you''ll be unable to treat yourself symptomatically.

Good luck and have some fun out there while the rest of us are working on our boats!

Jack
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 08-27-2002
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 84
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
colehankins is on a distinguished road
paranoid about getting seasick

Try to eat peaches. Just plain old cling peaches. They dont stop you from getting sick, but they dont taste so bad coming back up.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 08-28-2002
dkz dkz is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Posts: 12
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
dkz is on a distinguished road
paranoid about getting seasick

I had good results in one rough situation with Bonine. After getting sick on a long, rough daysail, I took Bonine before we set out the next day. Just as rough, and I felt so good I ventured up front in big seas to fix a bow light and threw out my back, so I spent the next three days in my bunk anyway. But it beat the hell out of being seasick. Bonine did give me drymouth, though, which I hated. And I think, if
you know you''re susceptible and won''t be able to get back to land, you should take it before getting on board.

dave
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 08-28-2002
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 51
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
Heruka is on a distinguished road
paranoid about getting seasick

I eat lots of beef jerky and pickled hot sausages.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 08-29-2002
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 459
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
DuaneIsing is on a distinguished road
paranoid about getting seasick

Bonine was also highly recommended to us, and some of the crew took it on a 10-day charter in June. No seasickness effects were felt, but the conditions never got bad either.

I don''t seem to suffer very often from seasickness, myself, as long as I''m not smelling exhaust fumes. That''s one of the reasons I love sailing as opposed to powerboating.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 08-29-2002
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 654
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
hamiam is on a distinguished road
paranoid about getting seasick

We have had good luck with three things: sea bands, the relief band, and a medication called Stugeron. Stugeron is only available outside of the US but is well worth the effort to get.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 08-29-2002
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 49
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
harvh is on a distinguished road
paranoid about getting seasick

I understand your concern. Some of the email responses to you mention different drugs you can take as well as wrist bands. All are good for some people and you should try them all to see what works best for you.

When I take new sailors out on my boat and things start to roll, I have that person take the healm. I have never had about 30 minutes on the healm stearing the boat fail to cure Sea Sickness. The process makes you concentrate on a fixed point and thus reduces the amount of confusion the brain has trying to process the pitching and rolling conflicts in the inner ear.

Don''t be shy, if you feel uneasy ask to take the healm.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 08-29-2002
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 360
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
928frenzy is on a distinguished road
paranoid about getting seasick

It is a well know fact that drivers never get car-sick, even though their passengers may. The reason is because the driver has enough on their mind concentrating on the road ahead and how to negotiate it.

Sailing is is very much like driving on a twisty road. The helmsman is (hopefully) concentrating on the set course, other potential crossing traffic, and how to negotiate the seas ahead. When the brain is fully occupied, it has no capacity to get motion sick. ;^)

~ Happy sails to you ~ _/) ~
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 08-29-2002
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 159
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
MaryBeth is on a distinguished road
paranoid about getting seasick


I only skimmed through the above answers, I admit. If you are afraid, take precautions beforehand. If you''ve no trouble before, there''s no reason to believe you''ll have trouble on an overnight. The precautions meant to be taken are just that - precautions. You must take a dramamine or apply a patch at least thirty minutes before the journey starts. Otherwise the meds have no chance to take effect.

I''ve found that what has been told to me by much more experienced sailors tends to be true - that seasickness is caused by fear and hunger. There is nothing to be feared by the night outside of land; if you enjoy sailing at all, you will surely find it thrilling. And as for hunger, be sure to eat small meals, NOT greasy, on your trip out. OK, me of the iron stomach allowed a day guest to share a Butterfinger milk shake from Hardees and he later became ill because he was scared when a storm front blew up miles from us, but still within view.

Being onboard for days at a time is no diferent from being out for weeks at a time. The only difference is you do not close your eyes in the shower after being at sea for a week or so. Then you will bust your ass (sorry) believe me.

Bottomline - if you are afraid, then take what you are familiar with, Dramamine or Bonine or the scopolamine patch, but take it before you go; and do NOT mix any of these with alcohol. You will find yourself sleeping through the remainder of your journey.

I feel you''ll be fine.

MaryBeth
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:38 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.