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-   -   Show me your sailboat's interior (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/general-discussion-sailing-related/49138-show-me-your-sailboats-interior.html)

AllThumbs 11-22-2008 12:29 PM

Show me your sailboat's interior
 
You know the drill.

heinzir 11-22-2008 01:39 PM

http://inlinethumb41.webshots.com/41...600x600Q85.jpg

http://inlinethumb03.webshots.com/44...600x600Q85.jpg

http://inlinethumb62.webshots.com/41...600x600Q85.jpg

Ceiling under construction
http://inlinethumb38.webshots.com/44...600x600Q85.jpg

http://inlinethumb07.webshots.com/70...600x600Q85.jpg

AllThumbs 11-22-2008 01:46 PM

That is awesome. I have a lot to do on mine and the ideas from these photos is great. Let me ask you, the strapping that the cedar(?) is fastened to, it is epoxied onto the hull?

M275sailer 11-22-2008 01:53 PM

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/f...s/P8020305.jpg

M275sailer 11-22-2008 01:54 PM

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/f...s/P8020304.jpg

M275sailer 11-22-2008 01:56 PM

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/f...s/Image046.jpg

M275sailer 11-22-2008 01:57 PM

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/f...275_layout.jpg

heinzir 11-22-2008 02:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AllThumbs (Post 406085)
That is awesome. I have a lot to do on mine and the ideas from these photos is great. Let me ask you, the strapping that the cedar(?) is fastened to, it is epoxied onto the hull?

The strips behind the cedar are cut from 1/2" pressure treated plywood. I had to cut kerfs in them to allow them to conform to the curvature of the hull. I bought the cedar strips at Menard's. They are 5/16" thick tongue and groove strips sold for wainscoting.

Conventional wisdom says to epoxy the furring strips to the hull. I was working on the boat outside in my driveway in early winter and the temperature was way too cold for epoxy to set up. I used Gorilla Glue instead. It has a broader range of temperatures it can be used with. I left a worklight on in the boat that generated enough heat to keep everything above freezing.

I did this last winter, and so far the Gorilla Glue has held up well. Here in Minnesota we get temperature extremes from -30 in the winter to +95 in the summer. Also, this is a very lightly built boat so it probably flexes more than a more substantial craft (although I have never actually noticed any flexing.) Neither the flexing nor the temperature swings have broken the Gorilla Glue bond.

Sequitur 11-22-2008 03:55 PM

Here are a few shots, first of Sequitur's interior shortly after her fit-out had begun in Vancouver:

http://www.yacht-sequitur.ca/Salon looking aft1.jpg

http://www.yacht-sequitur.ca/Salon looking Forward1.jpg

Then a shot of her salon looking forward:

http://www.yacht-sequitur.ca/SS15.jpg

A look at the galley:

http://www.yacht-sequitur.ca/Galley Done1.jpg

The nav station and portside settee:

http://www.yacht-sequitur.ca/SS16.jpg

The forward cabin:

http://www.yacht-sequitur.ca/SS18.jpg

sailingdog 11-22-2008 04:10 PM

Heinzir-

I'm not sure I'd be comfortable using pressure treated lumber inside a boat. The compounds the pressure treated wood is treated with are very nasty and fairly toxic... and I'd prefer not to be stuck in an enclosed boat with them.. Just MHO...


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