living aboard in Mass. - SailNet Community
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 10 Old 02-05-2009 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
living aboard in Mass.

does anyone have suggestions on w/e living onboard 37' sailboat during winter months - better to pull out of water or keep afloat? What about snow and ice build up - are there suitable tarps/covers avilable? If pullout - where to dock and how to keep warm and comfortable. Would appreciate suggestions.
durbanite7 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 10 Old 02-05-2009
moderate?
 
camaraderie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,877
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 16
     
You are nuts...but there are other nuts doing this in Mass.
You can't live aboard on land.
In water will require bubblers to keep ice free around the boat. You will need to construct a "greenhouse" type covering for the boat using a grid of wood/plastic pipes or metal conduit and then cover that with plastic or tarps. Nothing comes pre-made. Finding a marina that allows and has winter liveaboards will be an issue.
Search a bit and you'll find lots of other posts and pictures about winter living aboard.

No longer posting. Reach me by PM!
camaraderie is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #3 of 10 Old 02-05-2009
Senior Member
 
billyruffn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 1,287
Thanks: 5
Thanked 27 Times in 18 Posts
Rep Power: 11
 
Cam, you can live aboard on the hard in winter. The trick is to build a big box that reaches to the deck level which is at least 6 feet longer and six feet wider than the hull. You then fill the box with straw and then construct the "greenhouse" as you suggested. You then install central electric heating and run an insulated plumbing line connecting boat's head to the boat yard sewage system and an insulated hose to a convenient water tap. Getting cable installed is hard, but with a good library of books and DVDs who needs cable TV.
---------------
Durbanite7,
Seriously, living aboard in a New England winter is at best like camping in winter. A very few, very hardy souls do it -- but only in the water and they are well-prepared with lots of gear and a sensory system that is immune to cold. If you're on the hard, it's like living in a single wall tent. Try a few weekends in a tent first. If you like it, then try doing it on a boat.
billyruffn is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #4 of 10 Old 02-06-2009
Senior Member
 
39512's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 101
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
 
There are liveaboards around Boston Harbor, both at Shipyard Quarters and Constitution Marina but not very many. Most are on larger motor yachts with clear shrink wrap and a 50 amp power supply. Both facilities shut off dock water for obvious reasons but both facilities have year round laundry and showers.

Needless to say, the ideal berths are closest to the ramps and hard to get.

A lot of liveaboards on smaller boats chose to either own a house or a boat and living aboard seems to be a way to do both. Most abandon the idea after awhile because the hardship is not worth what it actually cost to winter on a boat in New England

BillyR offers good advice. You want to ease into a decision to take this on. Beside the right boat, you will need a fairly good supply of anti-depressants. And every article of clothing you own will be fleece.
39512 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #5 of 10 Old 02-06-2009
Senior Member
 
SOUNDBOUNDER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Long Island Sound
Posts: 747
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
There are usually live-aboards in the more expensive urban areas of the northeast. New York has them, Boston has them.
This is a blog I found of a girl wintering aboard somewhere in MA. (I think).

Winter To-Do List


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
SOUNDBOUNDER is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #6 of 10 Old 02-06-2009
Swab
 
vega1860's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: At Sea
Posts: 805
Thanks: 2
Thanked 21 Times in 19 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 39512 View Post
And every article of clothing you own will be fleece.
Or wool

Thanks for the link to that blog Soundbounder.

We are still learning about living aboard in cold weather after having sailed from Hawaii to the Pacific Northwest. Of course, the weather here in WA is not as severe as in New England. The biggest challenge we have encountered is ventilation. In Hawaii we just left everything open and let the trade winds blow through the boat. Up here at 48 North the temptation is to button up and crank the heater but that results in severe condensation problems. A solar vent was recommended, which I installed, but of course there is not enough sun to keep the battery charged and we still generate enough condensation to fill the bilge in two weeks.

The solution is more ventilation and circulating fans. I am adding a DC exhaust ventilator that will run without the sun and another blower for the lazarette plus passive vents to allow circulation through all the interior lockers. Laura does not want me to install a solid fuel heater because of the requisite Charlie Noble so we rely on an electric heater. Propane is out because of the water vapor it generates.

By the time we get this all sorted out properly we will be on our way to Tahiti

New video added today


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
vega1860 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #7 of 10 Old 02-06-2009
Senior Member
 
SOUNDBOUNDER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Long Island Sound
Posts: 747
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Vega1860,
You are welcome!!!!

Here is another
We Live On A Boat

It is one of those things that if out of sight,..is out of mind.
But once you start to meet a few people who live aboard in the winter, then you realize there are more people doing so than you would have originally imagined.
Also, Soundings Magazine has a regular column by someone living aboard this winter in the Chesapeake. Sure that is further south than MA, but I am sure it was plenty cold this past month.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
SOUNDBOUNDER is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #8 of 10 Old 02-06-2009
Senior Member
 
christyleigh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: North Brookfield, Mass.
Posts: 935
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by camaraderie View Post
You are nuts...but there are other nuts doing this in Mass. You can't live aboard on land. In water will require bubblers to keep ice free around the boat. You will need to construct a "greenhouse" type covering for the boat using a grid of wood/plastic pipes or metal conduit and then cover that with plastic or tarps. Nothing comes pre-made. Finding a marina that allows and has winter liveaboards will be an issue.



Ahhh........ Southern wimps But really Cam, I have to take issue with a couple of your statements. These boats in my marina (in the front row) have been wintering in the water since the marina opened about 10 years ago - Without Bubblers/Circulators and had no damage. This was taken back in 2003 and I haven't seen this bad of a freeze myself but have talked to other people who have walked up to their boats while frozen in and reported no damage. The owner does offer circulators but in his newsletter a couple years ago he basically said - Don't bother..... and it's not a boat yard with repair facilities so he has nothing to gain by damaging boats. Some use them, most (me included) don't. In river ice flows or the arctic it may be different but in our Very Well Protected cove it's just no big deal.
As for the "Nothing comes pre-made" ... Fairclough and others make their boat specific tarp/frame systems for Land or Water storage.
Our marina is full of boats every winter and about 10 or so are winter live-aboards including a 70's era Nauticat next to me that has a diesel furnace with outside exhaust for No Condensation.
As for being "Nuts" from Mass...... yup, but I plan to retire down south with the rest of you wimps as soon as I can.

Stan
'Christy Leigh'
NC 331
Wickford/Narragansett Bay RI

Last edited by christyleigh; 02-06-2009 at 01:22 PM.
christyleigh is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #9 of 10 Old 02-07-2009
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 20
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
This is my first year living aboard in winter. Soundbounder mentioned my blog earlier in this thread. I've moved a few times, but am settled now in one location for the rest of the winter. A few things about the above comments, and my experiences:

1) Condensation will be the biggest problem. Temperatures drop outside and its toasty warm inside. One thing that helps, but isn't perfect, is a lot of insulation and bubble wrap on the inside of your hull. The condensation on my port side is worse than my starboard because it gets hit by the wind more. I put everything in my lockers in plastic bags, just in case. And now I check the lockers frequently. Other solutions: dehumidifier, constantly running fans, etc. I couldn't afford. All I did was insulation, bubble wrap, and plastic bags. Its ok so far. I mentioned the condensation problem only once on my blog and people still post comments with lots of suggestions.

2) Yes, there are places to liveaboard in the winter. And its waaaay cheaper than in the summer! A bubbler is a good idea, but as some suggested, it may not be necessary. Double check with your boat insurance company. Sometime they won't insure the boat in the winter without the bubbler. In MA? I have heard that Boston has a great community of liveaboards, but I haven't ever checked it out.

3) About the cover. There are two posts on my blog with pictures of my cover. Mine is a great one...almost a custom fit. Its a wood frame with a giant piece of canvass over the entire boat. It helps a lot with keeping warm inside and keeping the snow off. My cockpit is much warmer because of it.

Teresa
Sailing, Simplicity, and the Pursuit of Happiness
LittleFlower is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #10 of 10 Old 02-07-2009
moderate?
 
camaraderie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,877
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 16
     
Stan...thanks...I stand corrected!

No longer posting. Reach me by PM!
camaraderie is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Living aboard and learning to sail, or vice versa mark71565 Living Aboard 15 12-31-2008 02:23 AM
Reflections After One Year Living Aboard kmeeks Living Aboard 8 08-26-2006 03:26 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome