Coastal Cruising Defined - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 03-20-2009
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
bobmatri is on a distinguished road
Coastal Cruising Defined

Hi,

I am currently in the market for my first boat and am looking in the 25-30' range. I have been doing my share of homework specific to boats but one thing I am uncertain of is a fairly precise definition of coastal cruising. I am located in the northeast and will look to sail between Cape Cod and Long Island. Would this still be considered coastal cruising, as long as I kept land in sight?

Thanks in advance...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 03-20-2009
Freesail99's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,507
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Freesail99 will become famous soon enough
Send a message via Yahoo to Freesail99
Have a look at this thread.

When Does Coastal Crusing Become Off Shore
__________________
S/V Scheherazade
-----------------------
I had a dream, I was sailing, I was happy, I was even smiling. Then I looked down and saw that I was on a multi-hull and woke up suddenly in a cold sweat.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 03-20-2009
camaraderie's Avatar
moderate?
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,877
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 15
camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
Yes...you don't even have to keep land in sight. Just be able to get into port before the weather changes. (generally defined as being able to get weather reports, call coast guard/seatow, and make it into port within 24 hours.)
__________________
No longer posting. Reach me by PM!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 03-20-2009
CaptainForce's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: living aboard since 1972
Posts: 1,709
Thanks: 0
Thanked 12 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 9
CaptainForce will become famous soon enough
I'd agree with Camaraderie, it's a weather issue; however, with today's forecasting skills, I think there are many times when you can feel confident for a three day period. 'take care and joy, Aythya crew
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 03-20-2009
Valiente's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Valiente has a spectacular aura about Valiente has a spectacular aura about
There is no strict definition, because a crappy sailor can do coastal on a seaworthy boat, and a really good sailor can take an inappropriate or marginal oceanic boat over the horizon.

I think you can say 24 hours x 5 knots=about 120 miles of range under sail. Most boats in the 25-30 foot range will not have enough fuel to do that without a jerrycan or three, but some will. Others will be able to handle heavy weather, while some will be light enough to make distance with little wind.

I think that the expectation of a coastal boat is usually "fun, easily driven, good for having a beer on at the end of a day". 99% of the time, a production boat for coastal cruising will cover this off really well, as most people "coastal cruising" favour fair weather and will motor under 10 knots and head for shore over 20 or four feet of waves.

So if you intend to "keep on keeping on" in the coastal mode of being out of sight of land, but within a day's sail (like going from Florida to the Bahamas, say, or Maine to Nova Scotia), you'll want a somewhat different boat and a more robust skill set than a club racing Catalina 30 owner who will look for three days of 12-18 knot winds and two foot waves before contemplating a point-to-point trip down Lake Ontario, for instance.

A "coastal" boat can expect to encounter bad weather, but of short duration and maybe medium severity. Summer squalls, for instance, can be fierce, but don't typically develop the huge and long waves of the open ocean...the fetch is too short.

This is why it's a difficult question; when people say "coastal", I assume they mean "daysailer or fair-weather cruising". There's a lot of boats up to that, but which I would hesitate to put out of sight of land or in 35-40 knots, because they might prove too tender, too light, too ill-equipped for reefing down and too lightly built in the portlight, hatch and companionway departments.
__________________
Can't sleep? Read my countdown to voyaging blog @
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 03-20-2009
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valiente View Post
There is no strict definition, because a crappy sailor can do coastal on a seaworthy boat, and a really good sailor can take an inappropriate or marginal oceanic boat over the horizon.
Two examples: Heather Neill and her Flicka didn't make it more than a day out from Florida, even though the Flicka is a proven pocket bluewater cruiser. On the other hand, Webb Chiles made it most of the way around the world in a 18' open Drascombe Lugger... not exactly the most seaworthy sailboat around...
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 03-20-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 166
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
MoonSailer is on a distinguished road
I think it is the waves. It takes a while for wind to generate waves large enough to be dangerous. So a coastal boat is one that is designed to be in a safe place when the waves get too large. There are tables that tell how large the waves get with a certain wind speed and amount of time. Generally I think it is 48 hours from a safe harbor. Remember being close to shore is not the same thing as being close to a safe harbor!!!! Sailing west from Panama city Florida the closest rough weather inlet is Pensacola. About 80 miles even if you are only 5 miles offshore. Bowditch has a table that predicts that a force 5 wind can produce 8' waves in less than 24 hours!!!!! BTW you can download a complete Bowditch American Practical Navigator for free . I have a copy on my laptop.

Last edited by MoonSailer; 03-20-2009 at 11:21 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 03-21-2009
Valiente's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Valiente has a spectacular aura about Valiente has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Two examples: Heather Neill and her Flicka didn't make it more than a day out from Florida, even though the Flicka is a proven pocket bluewater cruiser. On the other hand, Webb Chiles made it most of the way around the world in a 18' open Drascombe Lugger... not exactly the most seaworthy sailboat around...
Precisely. Just as a side note, the fellow who sold me my hulking steel boot bought a Drascombe Lugger because his wife got a job "offer she couldn't refuse", so he wanted to go from world cruiser to "push off and raise sails ASAP".

The Lugger's an interest boat for people who like a lot of sail controls...

YouTube - Drascombe Lugger "Sally Gee"

Drascombe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
__________________
Can't sleep? Read my countdown to voyaging blog @
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 03-22-2009
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 28
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
sonofasonofasailer456 is on a distinguished road
I would probably go with what my insurance co says I don't know what others say mine says 25 miles after that I'm not covered.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 03-22-2009
Freesail99's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,507
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Freesail99 will become famous soon enough
Send a message via Yahoo to Freesail99
The NOAA forecast goes from Coastal to Offshore at 60 nautical miles. Which would be a very long days sail for many boats. If the weather turns bad, the coastal cruiser can run for shelter, but the offshore sailor has nowhere to hide he has to ride it out.
__________________
S/V Scheherazade
-----------------------
I had a dream, I was sailing, I was happy, I was even smiling. Then I looked down and saw that I was on a multi-hull and woke up suddenly in a cold sweat.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
THE Yacht Builder List T37Chef Boat Review and Purchase Forum 26 07-08-2011 06:51 AM
Definition of Coastal Cruising vs Blue Water toben General Discussion (sailing related) 51 03-08-2008 10:57 PM
Coastal v. Bluewater cruiser, your thoughts EveningStar Sailboat Design and Construction 17 11-02-2007 07:13 PM
Calculating the Cost of Cruising Paul & Sheryl Shard Her Sailnet Articles 0 04-03-2003 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:43 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.