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  #21  
Old 12-19-2012
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Re: Over reliance on electronics

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottyIrwin View Post
---- you shouldn't have any equipment on your boat you don't fully understand.----
I wonder if this is why I don't have any female crew?
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  #22  
Old 12-19-2012
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Re: Over reliance on electronics

Wow, my GPS/Plotter tells me if there's something beneath the keel. It keeps me on the correct course, much better than the compass, it provides me with XTE information so I know just how far the winds have pushed me off the rum line, it provides with with speed over ground, depth, full sonar imaging, time to waypoint, distance to waypoint, time of day, L/L, tidal information, tidal current information, and much, much more. When I install the 3G Radar it will provide me with 24 miles of range with alarms for targets, provide incredible target information, and the ability to see things such as approaching thunderstorms at distances to 36 miles, which is usually sufficient time to make ready for bad weather conditions.

Additionally, when I get around to making the connections, I also have full engine information: Oil pressure, engine temperature, RPM, fuel level, and more. It's all right there, all on the display, and each parameter has alarms. It's right there in front of me and I can monitor the information constantly, while still using my primary safety device - my eyes.

So, while you're looking around and absorbing what you can see, which I'm also doing, I'm also absorbing information that you cannot see, which may be even more important, especially when bad weather is closing in from behind you. That 7-inch, high-definition screen sitting at the helm station with full sonar information and imaging can provide you with things the chart will never reveal. And, while you're looking at the chart, you're not looking at what's in front of you. With the GPS/Plotter at the helm station you can do both, plus see what's beneath you. And, with the addition of 3G radar, and the antenna on the mast, see what's over horizon - beyond your view from the cockpit.

Now, I'm not anti paper charts - I have them and use them. But, as previously stated, those charts, and chart books are frequently out of date. At least I can update the GPS/Plotter via the internet, and thanks to a $19 USB antenna, I have internet connections at most locations I anchor for the night. I can't update the charts as easily, and as inexpensively.

Good Luck,

Gary
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  #23  
Old 12-19-2012
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Re: Over reliance on electronics

Hey Gary

Like I said, each person manages information differently (and while we're comparing, a top of the range chart plotter is a little different to a Garmin 76 handheld GPS, which was the debate I was having with Capt Aaron and Noelex).

There are some of us that have turned sailing into a cutting edge science, there are some of that still view it as a simple way of life. I clearly fall into the latter.

If your choice is to chemically analyse the seagull droppings on your deck, knock yourself out.
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  #24  
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Re: Over reliance on electronics

In my opinion it is all a trade off.

There are pluses and minuses to using basic technology, and there are also pluses and minuses to using electronics, we all have to decide for ourselves what tools and techniques we are going to learn and use.

That said, I do think it is easy to be seduced into thinking you know more about navigation than you really do when you rely too much on electronics.
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  #25  
Old 12-20-2012
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Re: Over reliance on electronics

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Originally Posted by Omatako View Post
OK so each person manages information differently. Here's my rationale - it may not work for you.
I guess we will have to agree to disagree.
I don't see the wisdom of deliberately turning off accurate, real (not predicted) SOG, and COG (let alone position) in coastal or offshore situations.

Last edited by noelex77; 12-20-2012 at 02:06 AM.
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  #26  
Old 12-20-2012
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Re: Over reliance on electronics

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Originally Posted by noelex77 View Post
I guess we will have to agree to disagree.
I don't see the wisdom of deliberately turning off accurate, real (not predicted) SOG, and COG (let alone position) in coastal or offshore situations.

Because it isn't about technology. If it was...


* Boaters would all be power boaters. Actually, boating is quite stupid, if you add it up. We all know this.

* Climbers would carry ladders, or better yet, just visit Google Earth. The air is too damn thin up there and climbing can be stressful.


And why in the hell do I care what SOG is when I'm not racing? I'm an engineer and understand the trig perfectly well... I just don't always care or would rather look at the water, consider the wind and tide, and test my ability at estimation. I my boat had a Tom-Tom I'd scream.

It's about something more visceral, basic and illogical. All of my early cruising was without GPS (didn't exist in any practical sense) and that made it more rewarding. Now most coastal cruising is idiot work unless you get caught in major fog. Risk you say? Well, yup, I suppose so if skill is lacking or overestimated.

Go watch "The Grinch" or "The Nightmare Before Christmas;" a very seasonal way to learn that it's something more.
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Last edited by pdqaltair; 12-20-2012 at 08:47 AM.
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  #27  
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Re: Over reliance on electronics

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Originally Posted by milutin View Post


those gadgets are invented for people who barely can caunt to 10 let alone to take moon or mars sight.
I bet their spelling and punctuation is poor as well.
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  #28  
Old 12-20-2012
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Re: Over reliance on electronics

" i never met SINGLE ONE american that can speak SINGLE ONE foreign language even with "poor spelling and punctuation" "
We are very much spoiled by the ability to travel 3000 miles without crossing a border.
I do have some language skills, a smattering of several but how many depends on whether you count horse and dog, both of which can be important languages in some places. In every language that I speak, I have perfect punctuation and spelling. In those that I might try to write, the punctuation and spelling are a different issue.

What I'd like to know is how come my telephone and thermos bottle are so damned smart, they understand what to do no matter what language is used with them. Well, except with the dog, he has no concept of what the telephone is, and ignores every sound that comes out of it, regardless of language.
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  #29  
Old 12-20-2012
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Re: Over reliance on electronics

ahahaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa aa

reading this I wonder how they succeeded to navigate 30 years ago,, let alone one hundred years ago.
what was it like traveling to japan 100 years ago?

those gadgets are invented for people who barely can caunt to 10 let alone to take moon or mars sight.


It never ceases to amaze me how many individuals pooh-pooh advancements in navigation, something that has likely happened since the invention of the compass. The same individuals are sailing around in fiberglass boats, with roller furling, in the mast furling, talking on their cellular telephones, looking for storms with their I-phone wather app, drinking canned beer, bottled rum, etc... Yep, real traditionalist!

Oh, and 100 years ago, most sailors, many of whom were commercial fishermen breathed a sigh of relief when they were lucky enough to eventually find their way home. Anyone that knows the history of commercial fishing, is well aware of the many, many tragedies at sea that took place when veteran sailors were limited to charts, a compass and a sextant. The rocky shoals of the world are filled with the debris from these vessels, while the adjacent shores often became the final resting place for the men who sailed aboard them.

Not only did advancements in marine navigational technology make sailing, and boating safer, it took a lot of the guesswork out of making a safe passage. Additionally, these devices require someone with more the rudimentary knowledge of boating in order to operate them with any degree of accuracy. "Can't count to 10" just don't cut it. These are not plug and play devices, and the vast majority of them require a significant learning curve in order to utilize the various functions.

I guess a true sailing purest will be out there with their wooden-hulled, hemp and pitch caulked, leaking vessel, rigged with rope rigging, canvas sails, buckets for bilge pumps, and a bilge filled with rounded keel stones, all this while attempting to determine where they are using nothing more than a WAG (wild ass guess) on a stormy night at sea. Oh, and the guys coming to your rescue, the USCG, they'll find you pretty quickly when you provide them with your exact lat/lon coordinates derived from your sextant that can't take sightings through the clouds. Whoops, almost forgot, you're still using semifore and waving flags or swinging a kerosene lantern in the middle of the night because satphones, VHF and Single Sideband radios are products of advanced technology. Guess you're gonna' go down with the ship!

Lots of luck,

Gary
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  #30  
Old 12-20-2012
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Re: Over reliance on electronics

I'll break it to you gentle before someone stomps on you with steel toed boots. That's a Dutch flag not a French flag.

Last edited by chamonix; 12-20-2012 at 05:22 PM.
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