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Old 06-23-2009
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I need a reality check, please

Hi,

I have a project boat and would like a reality check on my plan from those with experience.

I bought a 1976 Soverel 26 on a whim eight years ago. I reglassed and painted the hull before I moved, started having children, and forgot about her. The boat has been sitting, neglected, at my parents' for the past eight years. My children are now in school, my wife is back to work, and I now live at a house with a very large concrete driveway/parking lot in which to work (the previous owner had a huge RV). I'll be moving the boat here on July 1st.

My goal is to get her in the water May 1st, 2011.

The boat's current condition: The hull is excellent. The deck is the biggest problem. It has two large areas which will need recored. All the deck hardware needs to be re-mounted (properly). The inboard diesel is shot. There is a ton of deck hardware in good condition - it seems to be state of the art 1990's racing gear. Honestly, I could probably strip her and sell off the deck hardware for a good profit. The standing rigging is in decent condition and the running rigging is serviceable - sort of. The sails are good. I have seven, all 1990's era kevlar racing sails. The main is in good shape, I have 2 #1 genoa's - one is about 50%, the other looks unused. The #2, #3, and #4 all look new. The electrical system is junk and needs completely redone.

My plan:

2009: - Remove the diesel, re-core the deck, re-paint the deck, re-mount the deck hardware.
2010: - Finish re-mounting deck hardware (if not done), re-paint topsides, bottom paint, replace electrical system (I'll convert to an outboard and just have one battery with shore power recharge for minimal electrics).
2011: - Put her in the water, step the mast, replace running rigging, install outboard

I've never rehabbed a boat but I've rehabbed several houses over the past few years, so I'm pretty good with project planning and knowing what I can accomplish. The biggest single ticket item will be the outboard as I'll probably spring for a new one (thinking Suzuki).

I'm not looking to restore but to renovate. I want to do what I need (and little more) to get her on the water. I'll deal with "nice to have" later. My budget is pretty minimal until 2011 and then I'll have a significant jump in disposable income (allowing the new outboard, dockage, rigging, etc)

Those who have done similar, does my plan look feasible enough? Any tips or insights would be appreciated.

Thanks.
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Old 06-23-2009
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Good Plan

It sounds like you've got a good plan, the skills, and a good knowledge base to draw from.

What are you waiting for?

GO FOR IT!

Yep, quit wastin' time...daylight's a burning...

You know, we're all going to be checking to see if you make the 2011 deadline.

The good news is, if you start running into trouble you can always post here to get lots of advice...usually much more than you intended...or ever wanted...

Skipper, J/36 "Zero Tolerance"
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Old 06-23-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OhioTom View Post
Hi,

I have a project boat and would like a reality check on my plan from those with experience.

I bought a 1976 Soverel 26 on a whim eight years ago. I reglassed and painted the hull before I moved, started having children, and forgot about her. The boat has been sitting, neglected, at my parents' for the past eight years. My children are now in school, my wife is back to work, and I now live at a house with a very large concrete driveway/parking lot in which to work (the previous owner had a huge RV). I'll be moving the boat here on July 1st.

My goal is to get her in the water May 1st, 2011.

The boat's current condition: The hull is excellent. The deck is the biggest problem. It has two large areas which will need recored. All the deck hardware needs to be re-mounted (properly). The inboard diesel is shot. There is a ton of deck hardware in good condition - it seems to be state of the art 1990's racing gear. Honestly, I could probably strip her and sell off the deck hardware for a good profit. The standing rigging is in decent condition and the running rigging is serviceable - sort of. The sails are good. I have seven, all 1990's era kevlar racing sails. The main is in good shape, I have 2 #1 genoa's - one is about 50%, the other looks unused. The #2, #3, and #4 all look new. The electrical system is junk and needs completely redone.

My plan:

2009: - Remove the diesel, re-core the deck, re-paint the deck, re-mount the deck hardware.
Recoring the deck is relatively easy to do, especially if you work from the top down, rather than trying to preserve the exterior and working from the bottom up. Doing this with Epoxy resin is relatively easy and straight forward.

If you're going to remove the in-board and not replace it, you'll probably want to remove and close off the through-hulls that will no longer be necessary.

You'll also want to make sure that the outboard motor mounting system is decently supported to handle the forces involved.
Quote:
2010: - Finish re-mounting deck hardware (if not done), re-paint topsides, bottom paint, replace electrical system (I'll convert to an outboard and just have one battery with shore power recharge for minimal electrics).
2011: - Put her in the water, step the mast, replace running rigging, install outboard
Don't skimp on the electrical wiring materials—use marine grade wiring and adhesive-lined heat shrink crimp terminals.

Also, you might want to consider adding some passive electrical recharging capability, like a solar panel. Having to rely on shore power really limits your ability to cruise, especially if you're outboard powered, since an in-board engine has a much wider choice of charging options. I'd recommend you read the primer I've written on using Solar Power On Boats.

Quote:
I've never rehabbed a boat but I've rehabbed several houses over the past few years, so I'm pretty good with project planning and knowing what I can accomplish. The biggest single ticket item will be the outboard as I'll probably spring for a new one (thinking Suzuki).

I'm not looking to restore but to renovate. I want to do what I need (and little more) to get her on the water. I'll deal with "nice to have" later. My budget is pretty minimal until 2011 and then I'll have a significant jump in disposable income (allowing the new outboard, dockage, rigging, etc)

Those who have done similar, does my plan look feasible enough? Any tips or insights would be appreciated.

Thanks.
Just remember, overall, the materials costs are going to be relatively small, as a percentage of what you actually spend, in time and money, and skimping on the materials is going to lead to an inferior end-result, so spend the small amount that it will cost to get the right materials.
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Old 06-23-2009
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The biggest issue i am running into as i refurb my 1981 J24 is from and insurance standpoint it will have about the same value no matter how much i fix it up

I have allready found that things like refinishing the mast despite the fact that the project most likely stoped it from failing from corrision did not inprove the value of the boat from and insurance standpoint

So i have to be carefull about investing into things that cant be recovered if soemthing happens to the boat
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If a dirty bottom slows you down what do you think it does to your boat
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Old 06-23-2009
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Reality Check-
It will cost you 2 times what you are thinking.
It will take 3 times as much time.
You will enjoy this boat 100 times more than any turn key boat.

Please post pictures!
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Old 06-23-2009
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I might look closer at the SHOT motor after you get it out.

Here is a little trick I like--use electrical tape to cover the empty holes when removing deck hardware, it's waterproof.

It is easy to remove and leaves little if any residue after its been on a long time unlike masking or duct tape.

It also is the better than masking tape for almost all applications.

Using it for masking tape it will not leave that little feather edge that paper tape does and you can leave it on for weeks and it comes right off.
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Old 06-23-2009
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Tom, I refurbed my islander 26 in my spare time. It had a lot of the same problems you indicated in your opening post plu a few more. It took about 3 years and although at times aggravating, I enjoyed it immensely. I also continued to sail my islander during the rehab. Major projects like deck coring and gutting the inside where done over the winter months. I know little about the processes before I got started and actually found this site doing research. Got a lot of great information from sailnet. There are a lot of books in the library. One is called "From a bare hull" and others loaded with information I found a lot of my materials on line searching websites and saved probably 50 to 60 percent in material cost. Took time but was worth it. As some one mentioned earlier you will be proud of your achievement when done more than if you bought a turnkey boat. By the way I sold it for a profit 5 year after I bought it.

Good luck and enjoy your adventure.
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