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CodeZero 07-24-2009 10:39 AM

Code Zero configuration
 
I am preparing to reassemble my boat after someone else decomissioned it; it has a code zero as the staysail on furling - with a staysail boom. The haylard is static mounted just above where the staysail forstay would be attached the mast near the top - when the sail is down the haylard runs down to a free standing sheeave attached to the staysail head and then runs back upand enters the mast just below where the staysail forstay would be attached. It then runs internaly down the mast and out near the base to a winch.

In other words - near the top of the mast there are three attachments about 6 inches appart - first is the static end of the Staysail haylard, then where the staysail forstay would attach and below that a sheave box which runs the bitter end down the mast. On the fordeck there is one padeye forward of the staysail boom assembley - not two.

So when the Code Zero is ready to be raised it's a double purchase as it's raised. The sheave is integrated into a swivel with a rectangular "cage" which looks like a inner forstay would run through it to not allow the entire sheave to rotate. There is no innner forstay that came with the boat and the reading and pictures I have seen only have a swivel at the top. From what I see a inner forstay is required as a guide only, am I on the right track? Would it be better to attach a swivel only at the top and do away with the forstay completly? The sail is not a genaker or other - it's just a dacron staysail.

JohnRPollard 07-27-2009 09:28 AM

More info, please.

What kind of boat?

You say "it has a code zero as the staysail on furling - with a staysail boom." That's an unusual configuration in my experience.

CodeZero 07-27-2009 10:49 AM

Yes - I beleive it is a non-standerd config from the reading I have done.. Typically it is used for a Genaker or other light sail. This setup from what I now understand allows the boat to better point into the wind since you can pull it in closer than of you were using sheets outside the shrouds. You would furl the Genoa and use the code zero only (and main/mizzen) when running upwind. The vessel is a 1980 48' Soverel, Hull #11.

I have researched this further and was able to view some photos of other Soverel 48's - this is a owner configuration; the Code Zero haylard's static end now appears to be attached to the former inner forstay mount on the mast. They may have run the bitter end through the swivel/block/rectangular cage to guid it up with the double purchase - this is difficult to explain as I sail and work on the boat alone and my sailing terms are not as strong as they could be.

I beleive what I will end up doing is attaching another mast chainplate for a inner stay just above the old inner stay mast chain plate and keep the code zero the way it is. On the deck side there is a 14" track where the inner forstay attached and a padeye that was added for the code zero just forward of the track.

Any information or suggestions are welcome.

Thank you,

BDM

JohnRPollard 07-27-2009 12:01 PM

I think the confusion stems from your use of the term "Code Zero". A Code Zero sail is a very large sail, similar to an asymmetric spinnaker, but with a low-stretch line integrated into the luff. The integral line in the luff allows the sail to be flown with a taut luff to higher wind angles than a typical asymmetric chute, and also allows it to be deployed and doused with a furler system. It is normally flown as the foremost sail, forward of the genoa, while close-beam reaching in moderate wind conditions.

Based on the information you provided above, my best guess is that the sail you are describing is either a spinnaker forestaysail ('staysail) or another sort of 'staysail with an integral stay. The spinnaker 'staysail is sometimes flown in conjunction with the conventional spinnaker when reaching (as opposed to running deep). Unlike most conventional 'staysails that are hoisted on the forestay, these sails are set on the fly. With the integral "stay" sewn into the luff, it gets tacked to a deck pad eye and then hoisted from its bag by the 'staysail halyard.

Spinnaker staysails are not too commonly seen these days, but on boats of your era they were not unusual. However, the two-to-one purchase at the head of halyard (which allows the luff/stay to be cranked nice and tight with a conventional mast/halyard winch) suggests to me that this might be more of an upwind/reaching 'staysail, rather than a spinnaker 'staysail (which does not usually require a very tight luff).

Hope this helps some.

CodeZero 08-04-2009 07:04 PM

CodeZero
 
Thanks, it does - I like the configuration - if it's not a CodeZero perhaps a stay-sail is the best term to use here. Actualy a freind described it as a CodeZero - I had never heard of or seen one before.

If your a rigging wiz I posted another titled Dual or split backstays or simalar.

Thanks again!

Code Zero


Quote:

Originally Posted by JohnRPollard (Post 508883)
I think the confusion stems from your use of the term "Code Zero". A Code Zero sail is a very large sail, similar to an asymmetric spinnaker, but with a low-stretch line integrated into the luff. The integral line in the luff allows the sail to be flown with a taut luff to higher wind angles than a typical asymmetric chute, and also allows it to be deployed and doused with a furler system. It is normally flown as the foremost sail, forward of the genoa, while close-beam reaching in moderate wind conditions.

Based on the information you provided above, my best guess is that the sail you are describing is either a spinnaker forestaysail ('staysail) or another sort of 'staysail with an integral stay. The spinnaker 'staysail is sometimes flown in conjunction with the conventional spinnaker when reaching (as opposed to running deep). Unlike most conventional 'staysails that are hoisted on the forestay, these sails are set on the fly. With the integral "stay" sewn into the luff, it gets tacked to a deck pad eye and then hoisted from its bag by the 'staysail halyard.

Spinnaker staysails are not too commonly seen these days, but on boats of your era they were not unusual. However, the two-to-one purchase at the head of halyard (which allows the luff/stay to be cranked nice and tight with a conventional mast/halyard winch) suggests to me that this might be more of an upwind/reaching 'staysail, rather than a spinnaker 'staysail (which does not usually require a very tight luff).

Hope this helps some.



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