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  #21  
Old 08-28-2009
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Ok, ALthough I do not think of myself as an old salt we have done a number of miles and passages, so for what is wirth heres my 0.02;

you really do not need a heavy displavement full keel boat for cruising.
keeping your systems simple pays off , no waiting for parts for yer refer etc.
Learn to sail your boat... you do need to be able to sail on and off an anchor without your motor, to heave to, etc etc. SAil your boat as if it were engineless.
IT does not cost anywhere near what you think it must to cruise, I was very happy on less than 200 a month, and as a couple we seem to be at about 300 a month ( plus boat maintenance)
Eat well- its important.
dont worry about the cosmetics, spend your time and money on the important systems.
COmfort is very very important, so make sure your boat is as comfortable as it can be, little luxuries like full length mirros do wonders for morale.
if you have to have a choice between insurance and equipment spend the money on way oversize anchors and chain ( lots of both)
you can never have too much line onboard
its meant to be fun, not an endurance contest, so always take the easy route.
Never buy a project boat thinking its a cheaper way into sailing- its not
Cruising you will very very rarely encounter truly heavy weather
its amazing how strong your realtionship will become after a few days at sea.
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  #22  
Old 08-28-2009
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Thanks Rhos. I've started linking newbs to this thread so they can get some of the best answers to FAQs as quickly as possible.

Great stuff.

Cheers!

PS - I never said you were "old". Just salty! Heh-heh.
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  #23  
Old 08-28-2009
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Now how about some of you gear heads dig up some good stuff from the G&M forum?? And somebody get MaineSail over here!!
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  #24  
Old 08-30-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RhosynMor View Post
Ok, ALthough I do not think of myself as an old salt we have done a number of miles and passages, so for what is wirth heres my 0.02;

you really do not need a heavy displavement full keel boat for cruising.
keeping your systems simple pays off , no waiting for parts for yer refer etc.
Kiss system is the best way to go...
Learn to sail your boat... you do need to be able to sail on and off an anchor without your motor, to heave to, etc etc. SAil your boat as if it were engineless.
It may be necessary to have an engine... But that engine could be kaput when you need it...

IT does not cost anywhere near what you think it must to cruise, I was very happy on less than 200 a month, and as a couple we seem to be at about 300 a month ( plus boat maintenance)
This depends on how materialistic you are
Eat well- its important.
Never been known to turn down a meal...
dont worry about the cosmetics, spend your time and money on the important systems.
A lot of truth here...
COmfort is very very important, so make sure your boat is as comfortable as it can be, little luxuries like full length mirrors do wonders for morale.
Creature comfort is very necessary. . . I enjoy my creature comfort!!
if you have to have a choice between insurance and equipment spend the money on way oversize anchors and chain ( lots of both)
If your back can't lift it , put in a bigger winch!
you can never have too much line onboard
Amen
its meant to be fun, not an endurance contest, so always take the easy route.
Yelling is not a means of communitcation, just frustration displayed.
Never buy a project boat thinking its a cheaper way into sailing- its not.
Are you a sailor or just a repairman?
Cruising you will very very rarely encounter truly heavy weather
Not that much and it isn't really that scary... Well I don't think so...
its amazing how strong your realtionship will become after a few days at sea.
And your sense of confidence becomes stronger also.
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Last edited by Boasun; 08-30-2009 at 08:48 AM.
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  #25  
Old 09-01-2009
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Are old fiberglass boats near dead? (Old vs. New)

Another good summation by JeffH:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H View Post
This topic comes up frequently. Here is my response from a similar thread comparing older to newer boats:

Obviously, one of the most obvious differences between early fiberglass boats and more modern fiberglass construction is sheer amount of weight and how it is distributed. but there are also big differences in how they were built.

There is a very popular myth that early fiberglass boats are as heavy as they are because early designers did not know how strong fiberglass actually was. That''s bunk!

During WWII the US government had done a lot of research on fiberglass composites and that information was pretty readily available. The properties were really pretty well understood. Carl Alberg was working for the Government designing fiberglass military gear when the Pearson''s hired him to design the Triton. He knew how fiberglass worked. What he knew, and as most designers of that era and as we know today, is that while fiberglass reinforced polyester laminates are pretty strong in bending, they are not very stiff. This means that when loaded like a beam, fiberglass laminates can with stand a large loading and bend without breaking but will bend farther than other materials such as the same weight piece of wood with the same loading. (That is why fiberglass fishing rods became so popular in the early 1950''s)

But they also understood that fiberglass is a pretty fatigue prone material and that flexing greatly weakens fiberglass over time and so building a flexible boat will greatly reduce the laminate''s strength over time.

Early designers understood stood all of this about fiberglass. In order to try to get fiberglass boats with close to the same stiffness as wooden boats, fiberglass hull thicknesses were increased beyond what was needed strictly for bending strength. That is why they were as thick as they were.

What was not understood very well was how to handle the raw materials, resins and fabrics, during construction to maintain the Fiberglass''s inherent strength. To achieve the full inherent strength of the various materials in fiberglass used in a fiberglass hull requires:
-Careful mixing of the resins,
-A surprisingly long cure time,
-Careful handling of the reinforcing fabrics (For example folding fiberglass mat or cloths weaken the individual fibers)
-And a proper proportion of resin to reinforcing fiber.

The difference in strength and durability between an ideal laminate and one that was laid up less than ideally can be enormous, especially if allowed to flex a lot over time (perhaps as much as 50% on a unit basis). The extra thickness in the hull might add as much as 30% to the overall bending strength of the hull but substantially less (perhaps between 5% and 10%) to its resistance to puncture (sheer).

One of the really striking things about early fiberglass boats is the almost total lack of internal framing compared to more modern design. Early fiberglass boats were a wonder in their simplicity of design and construction. Early designers viewed the fiberglass hull and deck as a monocoque structure and so really did not try to brace it with a systematic layout of longitudinal or athwartships framing.

Whatever internal framing there was used on these early boats was not tabbed into the hull with the same attention that was given to tabbing by the 1970''s. When I worked in boatyards in the 1970''s it was not all that unusual to see these 60''s era boats come in ''banana''d'', (as it was called which meant flexed until the tabbing on bulkheads, flats and risers had been loosened) by the extremely high rigging loads of that era. I spent a lot of times re-tabbing boats in those days.

Also when you work on these boats it is not unusual to find very resin rich laminations. Resin really adds almost no strength to fiberglass. It is really there to hold the fibers. In early boats, lots of resin was used because it made it easy to wet out the cloth and to get compartively smooth surfaces for layup to layup bonding. These resin rich laminates results in lower initial strength and a more fatigue prone laminate. In the 1970''s this became better understood and today even pretty inexpensive boats are careful to use better ballanced resin to fiber contents. It is quite routine to see vaccuum bagged (or injection/ vaccuum techniques like Scrimp) that produce very light, dense and strong parts within the industry.

While there were some internal elements glassed to the hull they occurred where convenient to the design and allowed shockingly large unsupported panels. When you sailed these older boats and a wave hit the hull, you would feel the vibration of the panel flexing. While this flexure does not equate to weakness, it does equate to the likelihood of more fatigue over time.

On a point by point basis I would compare early fiberglass to newer fiberglass this way:

Resins: Early boat builders tended to use a lot of accelerators in an effort to decrease curing time. The use of accelerators tends to produce a more brittle and fatigue prone laminate. In the Mid-1970''s and early 1980''s resin formulations changed producing resins that are especially prone to osmotic blistering. By the mid to late 1980''s resins were changed again reducing the likelihood of blistering. Today, it is not unusual to find more exotic resins (vinylester and epoxy) used in even mass production boats. Vinylester in particular offers a lot if used in outer laminates. Vinylester is nearly as water impermeable as Epoxy but is far less expensive. VE offers superior fatigue, and blister resistance. When used with higher tech fabrics (even higher tech fiberglass fabrics), VE dramatically increases the strength of lay-up. Boats like the new C&C 99 are using epoxy resins as well.

Reinforcing fabrics:
Early fiberglass fabrics have comparatively short fiber lengths and lower fiber strengths than current materials resulting in less strength. Beyond that they were often handled poorly (folded and stacked) so that the strength of the fibers were reduced further. In the 1970''s as better stress mapping was understood, directional fabrics were developed and even conventional materials were more properly oriented to improve their load capacities.

Today, we use higher strength conventional laminates, and have an arsenal of higher tech fibers range from Bi-axial and Tri- axial oriented fiberglass fabrics, to higher strength fiberglass fibers due to improved fiber manufacturing techniques, materials like Kevlar and Carbon fiber. (Even value oriented builders like Hunter and Beneteau are employing Kevlar in its newest boats for increased strength, stiffness and abrasion resistance.)

Framing, liners and Coring:
Early boats rarely had cored or framed hulls. They also rarely had either structural or cosmetic liners. This is an area that is a bit more complex with good and bad aspects to each of these options. To breifly touch on each type of construction, there is cored and non-cored and framed and non- framed with specialized types of each. You often hear people use the term ''Solid Glass Construction''. This is actually a very vague and not a terribly precise description of the structure of a FRP boat. As the term ''Solid Glass'' construction is typically used it means a boat that does not have a cored hull. A non-cored hull can be monocoque (the skin takes all of the loads and distributes them), like many small boats today and larger early fiberglass hulls. They can also be framed as most modern boats are constructed today.

A cored hull is a kind of sandwich with high strength laminate materials on both sides of the panel where they do the most good and a lighter weght center material. Pound for pound, a cored hull produces a stronger boat. Cored hulls can also be monocoque or framed construction. While cored decks are almost universally accepted in one form or another, cored hulls tend to be a very controversial way of building a boat. Done properly , pound for pound there is no stronger, stiffer, more durable way to build a boat. It''s the "done properly" that mekes coring so controversial. Ideally a hull is cored with a closed cell, non-out-gassing, high density foam, that is vacuum bagged into place. Thru-hull orface and bolting areas are predetermined and constructed of solid glass or reamed out and filled with epoxy. All of that makes proper coring expensive to construct. There is almost nothing better than a properly cored hull, and almost nothing worse than a poorly constructed cored hull.

Decks are typically cored with end grain Balsa. End grain balsa offers excellent sheer resistance for a given weight and cost. The orientation of the cells theoretically promote good adhesion with the laminate and also resists the spread of rot. Early boats often had plywood decks with glass over. This is the worst of all worlds. Because of the orientation of the cells plywood tends to distribute rot very quickly once rot starts. Plywood tends to be heavier than other deck cores and does not have as good adhesion to the laminate as other core choice. Plywood was a cheap but not very good way to go.

Framing helps to stiffen a hull, distribute concentrated loads such as keel and rigging loads, and reduce the panel size which helps to limit the size of the damage caused in a catastrophic impact. Framing can be in a number of forms. Glassed in longitudinal (stringers) and athwartship frames (floors and ring frames). Used in combination, all of which combined provide a light, strong and very durable solution but one that is expensive to manufacture and require higher construction skills to build precisely.

Molded ''force grids'' are another form of framing. In this case the manufacturer molds a set of athrwartship and longitudinal frames as a single unit in a mold in much the same manner as the rest of the boat is molded. Once the hull has been laid up the grid is glued in place. The strength of the connection depends on the contact area of the flanges on the grid and the type of adhesive used to attach the grid. This is a very good way to build a production boat but is not quite as strong or durable as a glassed in framing system.

Another popular way to build a boat is with a molded in ''pan''. This is can be thought of as force grid with an inner liner spanning between the framing. This has many of the good traits of a force grid but has its own unique set of problems. For one it adds a lot of useless weight. It is harder to properly adhere in place, and most significantly it blocks access to most of the interior of the hull. Pans can make maintenance much harder to do as every surface is a finished surface and so it is harder to run wires and plumbing. Adding to the problem with pans is that many manufacturers install electical and plumbing components before installing the pan making inspection and repair of these items nearly imposible.

Glassed-in shelves, bulkheads, bunk flats, and other interior furnishings can often serve as a part of the framing system. These items are bonded in place with fiberglass strips referred to as ''tabbing''. Tabbing can be continuous all sides (including the deck), continuous on the hull only, or occur in short sections. Continous all sides greatly increases the strength of the boat but may not be necessary depending on how the boat was originally engineered. The strength of the tabbing is also dependent on its thickness, surface area and the materials used. When these elements are wood they can often rot at the bottom of the component where the tabbing traps moisture against the wood.

Most early boats were non-cored hulls with minimal framing, this allowed a lot of flexure and really put a lot more stress on the minimal framed connections within the boats. Most had balsa or plywood cored hulls.

Hull to deck joints:
Early boats typically had a number of hull to deck joint. Most simply had an inward turning flange on the hull and that was bolted through the deck and toe rail. These thru-bolts were seen as the primary bond and varied widely in size and spacing. They rarely had backing plates even from the best builders of the era. Between the hull flange and the deck was either some form of bedding compound, such as polysulfide (like Boatlife) or organic compounds (like Dalphinite) or more commonly a polyester slurry. All of these are comparatively low adhesion and lifespan solutions.

In the 1970''s some offshore intended cruisers started glassing the joint from the interior but the big change was to higher adhesion caulking/ adhesives in the joint. 3M''s 5200 became a common adhesive for this purpose. Bolt spacing was increased as builders often considered the 5200 to be the primary connection. Outward facing flange connections became more popular because they permit quicker turn around time for the molds and less labor to prep the mold for the next boat. They are inherently weaker and more vulnerable.

Today, most manufacturers seem to be using any one of the earlier techniques with the ''Big Three'' using extremely high adhesion adhessives engineered for the aerospace industry. These produce extremely sturdy joints that should outlive most of the other joint types that have preceded them. You never hear of hull deck failures any more which back in the 1970''s seemed to be a fairly frequent occurance.

Rigging:

Early glass boats tended to use extremely stiff spars and extremely high rig tensions. Without adjustable backstays these high loads were imparted into the hull on a routine basis. They really can take a toll on a boat. It was not unusual to find these early boats so distorted by rigging loads that doors in passageways would not close on a beat.

In the late 1970''s and into 1980''s there was a real shift in turnbuckle design. Some of the more popular turnbuckle designs really had comparatively short life spans and resulted in lost rigs and rigging. By the 1990''s turnbuckle design had changed yet agaib and seemed to have moved toward a more durable engineering.

Over time rigs got lighter and more flexible. This is a mixed blessing. A slightly flexible rig imparts less load into the hull and deck and bend can be increased to depower sails. Taken to the extremes seen in late 1970''s through early 1990''s race boats, they make a rig that is hard to keep in the boat. In the early 1990''s IMS recognized this problem and shifted the ratings a bit to encourage stronger rigs and so rig losses in newer IMS type race boats are compartively uncommon these days. Some of this improvement is the use of Carbon Fiber spars. Carbon Fiber makes a really stiff and shocking light spar material but is very expensive and the jury is still out on the long term life expectancy of carbon spars.

In conclusion:
Early fiberglass boats were really engineered as if they were a wooden boat built out of fiberglass. They ended to be more flexible and although heavy, the poorer strength of materials that came from material and handling choices meant that they had very high stresses but they were not as sturdy as they appear. By the 1970''s designers better understood how to engineer fiberglass as fiberglass, but were faced with historically poor resins that resulted in real blister problems. By the 1980''s resins improved, as did fiberglass material handling techniques and rigging design and strength of materials. The blister problem was better understood and higher tech resins and fibers entered the industry. Today''s baots tend to be lighter and stronger than earlier boats. This weight savings is used to produce higher ballast ratios and to produce greater stability or carrying capacities. Hull deck joints have improved in some ways, but I hate the fact that outward flanges are becoming popular again. Blister problems have been reduced greatly and rigs are becoming easier to operate. That said I see popularity of inmast furling mainsails to be a serious negative trend.

At least that is how I see it.

Respectfully
Jeff
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  #26  
Old 09-02-2009
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Tandem Anchoring Techniques

One version of how to do a tandem anchor for tide/wind shifts...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Giulietta View Post
I anchor many many times in a place called Culatra Island, here in Portugal.

It has 3 to 5 knot currents twice a day, in both directions.

I have been using the tandem method here, for over 20 years, and never draged once. Do it only one anchor I don't care what anchor.....and bye bye...

I use a smaller Danforth anchor (14kg) with 10 feet of rope, attached to the "head" of my main anchor, a 28Kg plow, then chain, then rope. Here is what everyone uses, or you're dragging all the time.

Works for me, and for the others. Our bottom is mud / sand / weed.

Some say its a disater waiting to happen (specially Craig Smith of Rocna, but he is he, and I am me....,) if the smaller first anchor rolls around the primary as the boat circles with the current. So far in over 20 years no problem what so ever.

I do it.

Here is a drwing

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  #27  
Old 09-06-2009
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How do I get started and what does it cost?

Here's some great info from a couple of older but still great articles from Sue & Larry:

The Cruising Life - How to Get Started, Part One

The Cruising Life - How to Get Started, Part Two
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  #28  
Old 09-07-2009
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Sailing in Fog

A great rundown on radar setup/usage and sailing in fog by Maine Sail...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maine Sail View Post
Being from Maine and cruising from Maine to Canada I find this statement from Raymarine rather ridiculous.

I have had radar mounted on the mast, a Questus back stay mount and a pole. I currently have it on a pole and HATE IT for performance reasons. Even when I had it on the mast, on three other boats I've owned, I could pick up my boat neighbors in the mooring field with no problems.

Even in Maine, where fog was invented, I have yet to find more than 4 or so days out of the last 20+ years where the visibility was less than 75 feet. If you have not acquired a target by the time it gets that close you're just not doing your job.

As someone who has spent literally thousands of hours operating radar in the fog, as both a commercial fisherman and a pleasure boater, there is NO question that a mast mount, 22-25 feet up, would be my preferred placement. Eventually I will remove my pole and place my dome on the mast but the boat came this way and the radar pole has been painted around with Awlgrip. I clench my teeth every time I am in 6+ foot swells, and fog, and keep loosing targets and having to re-aquire them due to the low dome height when in a trough. I rarely if ever had this problem with domes mounted on the mast.


If you only sail in protected foggy bays with no swell or chance of a sea a pole mount can suffice but if you venture into the open ocean, at night, or in the fog, a higher dome placement will track and keep targets on screen far better.


It's not all just about radar either.....


Things to do when in fog to be a good boater and to be courteous to others.

Radar Reflector
= BUY ONE AND USE IT!!!! Just because you choose not to have radar does not mean you should choose to be invisible or nearly invisible to the rest of the world who may be practicing good collision avoidance.

VHF = USE IT and by that I mean turn the darn thing on and monitor VHF 16. PLEASE! The rest of us don't have your cell number on speed dial. "Vessel rounding 2KR what are your intentions, over?........." Silence..........=dumb

Running Lights
= When the visibility drops USE THEM! They do help and can add another 50-100 feet of warning.

Fog Signals = For Christ sake Wal*Mart sells sports air horns for $6.00. Please get one and use it properly.

Slow Down = A single sailboat traveling at 6 knots is covering 10.1 feet per second. In 100 feet of visibility the collision time to a fixed object is roughly 11 seconds from your first physical sighting. Of course you should have aquired this target LONG before 100 feet!! Now take two sailboats converging, each traveling at 6 knots, your collision time in 100 feet of visibility, from your first physical sighting, becomes just 5 seconds. You had better aquire your targets LONG before the stated by Raymarine "close in performance" even matters or you'll be in a heap of trouble..

A power boat traveling 30 knots, on a collision course, will collide with a sailboat doing six knots, at 100 feet of visibility, in under two seconds from the first sighting! You will NOT have enough reaction time to avoid a collision with a clown like this other than to have radar and been tracking him far ahead of the "close in performance". Think people don't go fast in the fog? Think again..

Some photo examples of what these reckless boaters look like:

There really is a boat here 200+ feet off my stern. No radar, no reflector, no running lights, no horn signals and not even a VHF response. "Dumb dee dumb, sailing awayyyy, dumb dee dumb, doh', a boat, how'd that get there?"

Here's a radar shot of that boat when it was actually showing up. It's the red spec just above the 18 foot spot off my stbd stern quarter. The two targets ahead and to port and stbd were two J Boats traveling together both of which had reflectors when they went by. SOME BOATS JUST DO NOT SHOW UP ON RADAR!!! The guy behind me owns one!


1st class clown (see speed above), no radar, no lights, no horn signals, no reflector and also not showing up well, and not monitoring VHF!


For reference this is 400 feet of visibility from a few weeks ago (400 feet is generally fairly decent vis for Maine fog):


And here's the screen shot with the cursor just over the closest radar image at 411 feet (upper left corner measures distance).:




It scares me how many people are just plain dangerous and have no clue they are being so reckless. If they succeed once they do it again only this time with a greater level of comfort and confidence.

So in summary I'd still opt for mounting the dome on the mast..
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  #29  
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Battening down for heavy weather

A great thread on prepping for a serious blow from the "Seamanship" forum...

LINK HERE
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Old 09-16-2009
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What is the "perfect boat"?

Jeff gives his opinion on that...

Quote:
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I am not sure that there is such a thing as a perfect boat. Years ago, Tony Dias, a yacht designer friend of mine, was writing a book called "Designer and Client" showing how the design process worked by cronicling the process of designing boats for seven real people. I was one of them.

Here was the description that I wrote of my ideal boat for the book.

"My ideal boat would be the ultimate coastwise cruiser. Coastwise cruisers were first popularized in the 1920’s. While they were not intended to be race boats, they were fast enough to race competitively, and to get you home when it was time to go back to work. They were not intended as ocean voyagers, yet they were seaworthy enough to stand up to whatever weather encountered. They were not meant to be floating hotel suites but they provided a comfortable place cook and eat and sleep. In the 1970’s, the coastwise cruiser became the cruiser/ racer. They were still boats that could do both. Then came the age of specialization. Today, you’re forced to choose between blue water cruisers that are only intended for ocean voyaging, and race boats only intended for grand prix racing, and so called family cruisers that are designed to carry the maximum number of people crammed into their own little “staterooms”. I may dream of long ocean passages, or racing the grand prix circuit, and be attracted to the image presented in family cruiser literature but I have to ask myself, How do I really use my boat ?

I sail weekends, evenings, perhaps a long cruise now and then. I would love to live aboard but mostly cruise when time permits. I may race a few club races and perhaps the beer can series. I have friends to sail with, but more often than not sail a short handed. I am far more likely to face light to moderate conditions than to weather a gale underway and are more likely be hit by short chop and motorboat slop than the “ultimate wave”. I would like to follow the wind’s call but mostly follow a schedule. No gimmicks- just a fast and comfortable cruising boat

I would like something like:
Sensible interior:
Full sized berths for a reasonable number of people. Berths that are comfortable underway as well as at a boat show. Comfortable seating for the entire crew and a few visitors more. A galley that works. Canvas clothing lockers that can be packed ashore and carried aboard. Canvas hull liners that are light in weight and which can be thrown in the washer at the end of the season.

Sensible Galley:
The fully equipped galley is located near the companionway where it is within easy reach of the cockpit and dinette. Its position near the center of buoyancy means a galley with the least amount of motion. A top loaded Ice box. Frankly the one item that seems to be the most problematic on boats is refrigeration so I am not sure that I would have refrigeration. As a vegetarian this could work for me.

High Tech Construction:
The careful use of modern materials carefully engineered to produce a boat that is strong, light, and durable. Light to be able to drive through a chop or ghost in light air. Durable since you would rather use your limited time sailing than performing maintenance.

Fractional Rig:
The fractional rig is the perfect cruising rig. Since the majority of the sail area is in an easily de- powered mainsail there is no need live with an oversized genoa. This tall rig is very effective in light air. The comparatively small lapper jib works in a wide range of wind speeds. It is easy to tack and furls on a below deck mounted roller furler. As the wind builds the main is easily de- powered, just drop the traveler and crank in a bit of mast bend. When it really blows, the cockpit led reef lines and halyards permits quick on- the- fly reefing.

Daggerboard with Lead Bulb and Water Ballast:
Despite the shoal draft long keel, or wing keel hype nothing goes to weather like a properly ballasted deep draft keel. Unfortunately, many a great anchorage is inaccessible to a 7’-6” draft. A daggerboard would permit the boat to sail exceptionally well when depths permit and an electric center board winch would allow for quick draft adjustment when shallower venues beckon.. A 1990’s era Whitbread 60 style moveable water ballast would allow the boat to sail safer faster, and carry more sail comfortably in higher winds.

Full Size Tankage:
When a boat can sleep seven people it needs to have proper tankage and storage. Tankage should be something like 120 gallons of potable water storage in separate tanks, a 60 gallon holding tank (less with a treatment system), and a 80 gallon diesel fuel tank.



LENGTH OVERALL LOA 44’-6”


LENGTH ON WATERLINE LWL 41’-6”


BEAM ON DECK B 12’-8”


BEAM AT WATERLINE BWL 10’-1”


DISPLACEMENT 16,800 LBS.
DRAFT- BOARD UP 5’-7”
DRAFT- BOARD DN. 7’-7”

BALLAST- LEAD DAGGERBOARD 6,845 LBS.
BALLAST- WATER BALLAST 1875 LBS.
SAIL AREA
Mainsail 585 S.F.

100% Triangle 438 S.F.

TOTAL 1023 S.F.




DISPLACEMENT/ LENGTH RATIO 140 to 150


SAIL AREA/ DISPLACEMENT RATIO 24-25


BALLAST/ DISPLACEMENT RATIO 41 %




MAX. GZ Positive To 125 o"

I also drew a couple preliminary sketches at the time which are attached. I also really like my current boay a Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)

Jeff
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S/V Dawn Treader - 1989 Hunter Legend 40
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