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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
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  #21  
Old 08-30-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoatKid5 View Post
Thanks for all the replies. Lucky there is one near me that is for sale and is in good condition

it has the following sails: Mainsail, Jib, and 150 Genoa.
-is that enough to go and sail or will i have to buy more sails for it?

I am still trying to convince my parents that we should really do this. I hope we can do it. Any important things to know before buying a boat or to think about before buying a boat
Make sure you get a marine survey on any boat before you buy!
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  #22  
Old 08-30-2009
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A main, jib, 150 Genoa is all you'll need assuming sails are in reasonably good condition. Later, after you gain experience, you can fine tune sail inventory.

Which boat did you settle on?
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  #23  
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weekend sailboat

All the boats listed are good selections. If you want a great sailing boat that you can afford, try a San Juan 21. They are easy to sail and will out preform just about any boat their size. The San Juan has a completely retractable keel so it sits low on a trailer, which makes it easy to trailer and launch. You can go to this site:[url]www.sanjuansailing.blogspot.com[/rl] to see a cheap and great little boat along with a great story. The San Juan 21's have a website with all the help you will need to keep your boat going with a lot of helpful advise too. That website is:Jim Hubbard's San Juan 21 Sailing Page. I love my little San Juan, it is fast and economical. It will sail circles around a Catalina 22 and is a lot easier to trailer and launch. My good friend who taught me to sail has a catalina 22, but he leaves it at home and goes with me on my San Juan 21. Good luck on whatever you choose.

Jerry
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  #24  
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pretty sure that i like the Catalina 25-----what is a marine survey and where can i get more information on them.
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  #25  
Old 08-30-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoatKid5 View Post
pretty sure that i like the Catalina 25-----what is a marine survey and where can i get more information on them.
It's almost always a wise move to get a boat properly 'surveyed' prior to purchase - and in many cases, esp if financing is involved the bank and/or the insurance carrier will require one. It is a thorough inspection that will detail any problems with the boat, stress the good things and provide an estimated market value.. any initial offer should be made subject to a satisfactory survey and sea trial.

It's much like a home inspection, but of course more specialized. Marine surveyors can be found in most boating areas, there are societies and organizations that they belong to, so it depends just where you are. Word of mouth is another good way of getting a good one. Generally you do not want to use a surveyor recommended by the seller or his/her broker. You need a clear unbiased independent report.

The several hundred dollars spent is a good investment even if you choose to pass on that boat - better a few hundred less in your wallet than ending up with a bad boat or one that will immediately cost you thousands in repairs.

The simpler the boat, generally the less costly the survey. On larger boats a separate rigging inspection, and a mechanical survey is also good practice.
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  #26  
Old 08-31-2009
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Thumbs up

Another boat you might want to consider is the C & C 26. There were not a lot produced. We owned two which we used for teaching our beginner sailing classes in a five-day live-aboard format. The boat has the same beam as the 30', 10' and has five berths over 6'. Inboard engine and a proper head. Huge amount of storage under the port pilot berth.

Your offer to purchase should normally contain the following "subject to" clauses:
Satisfactory survey covering the hull and rig,
mechanical inspection covering the engine and sea-trial where you go for a sail and check all systems and see if you like how she handles.

Good sailing with whatever you decide.
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  #27  
Old 08-31-2009
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looked at the c&c 26 looks like a very nice boat also. However the seem to be more expensive and i dont have the biggest budget. Also none are available near me...
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  #28  
Old 08-31-2009
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Catalina 25 would be an excellent choice. For Chesapeake Bay sailing I would recommend a shoal draft model. A sail inventory of a jib and mainsail is certainly all you need to get started. Stay away friom the McGregors. You can find a list of surveyors for your area on the BoatU.S. website BoatUS.com: BoatUS Home Page
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  #29  
Old 08-31-2009
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Kid: the Catalina 25 sounds like a great boat for you. I think it is simply the best value 25 foot coastal cruiser/weekender out there. There are usually a bunch available at any one time (tends to keep prices down!), so don't get fixated on a particular boat as another will always come along.

There were so many of these boats built that there are various incarnations to choose from. The primary "options" are pop-top vs. fixed coach roof; tall rig vs. std; dinette vs. fold down table; fin keel vs. swing keel. My 2 cents (adjusted for inflation) on the most important choices in order of importance: pop-top, fixed keel, dinette model with tall rig. Why? If you intend to spend any time at all in the cabin, you want the pop top. It gives you standing headroom in the cabin. A nice extra is if your boat comes with the canvass side panels that "enclose" the open pop top. The fixed keel boat sails better than the swing keel, is lower maintenance and for my money, is safer (I don't want all of the boat's ballast held on by one pin). Of course, if you intend to trailer the boat, you need the swing keel; in fact, it becomes the driving factor in picking the boat. I like the dinette better than the drop table; its a personal thing. The drop table gives you more room below when it is swung up to the bulkhead, but if you intend to eat below, I like the dinette. And if you have little kids, the dinette is a perfect place for them to play. The need for the tall rig is really dependent on where you sail. Light winds? You want the tall rig. Lots of bridges? Maybe the standard is more convenient.

If you are comparing two different choices, don't forget to take overall condition into account. The condition of the boat (and the outboard) is just as important as any of the factors listed above. In any case, the C25 is a terrific boat, and you will be very happy. Good luck and let us know what you bought.
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  #30  
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what is the difference from the porta-pottie and a marine toilets with MSD's and holding tanks???
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