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Old 09-17-2009
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Question Asymm Spinnaker, any advice!

Racing this weekend on a boat with an asym spin. I've never raced with one of these, usually I've sailed with a sym.

How different is it, any tips for tricks for hoisting it or dousing it?

Thanks!
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Old 09-17-2009
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If you run a search, you should be able to find some good threads on asymm chutes.

In general, they are larger sails, and usually require the boat to sail at a higher apparent wind angle, than the typical symmetric chute. So expect to do more jibing on the downwind legs.

The big question will be whether the boat you crew on rigs for inside or outside jibes, which affects the jibing procedure (some boats go inside for light air and outside for heavy air.)

What kind of boat will this be? Will it have a sprit (hopefully)?
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Old 09-17-2009
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Thanks for the helps! From what I know

No sprit
No pole
Rigged for "inside" jibes (this concept is still new for me)
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Old 09-17-2009
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Merlin, do you know what your job is going to be on the boat? Pit? Mast? Forepeak? Trimmer? A-kites follow the same rule as symmetricals and will be 180% of the “J” unless you have a sprit or have taken a ratings adjustment. Before the hoist, you prefeed the tack just like a guy on a symmetrical. Are you doing bear-away sets? On mast or pit, you really need to get the sail up fast. The trimmers will already be flying the lower portion before you are at full hoist. Use the jib to blanket the kite and lower the jib after the hoist.

Outside gybe is when the clew flies out in front of everything before you grind in the “new” sheet. This is advantageous as you “grind on” the power. Gybing takes coordination between the driver an trimmer as the clew needs to float in front of the boat when the boat is DDW. Inside gybe is when the clew passes between the headstay and the tack. Once the clew is on the new board, you have instantaneous power and if it is very windy, control issues. We inside gybe when the wind is light. The mast man or forepeak may be called to run the clew around for a faster inside gybe.

Generally speaking, the tack goes in on the hotter angles and out when you are going deep. You will not be able to go as deep as a symmetrical kite. Trim the tack line so the tack and clew are even in height. If it is windy, bring the clew down to help control the sail. The magic happens in the sheet trimming, slow or over trimming can lead to round-ups or a broach. Gusty conditions will wear out the trimmer and grinders early so be prepared to step in on the winch if necessary

Take downs are fun – you can do windward’s leeward’s, floaters or Mexicans. Just communicate beforehand so everybody knows what to do. Flying the jib helps control the douse. Blowing the tack line does the same thing as easing the guy forward, by depowering the sail. You can letterbox or drop onto the forepeak. The pitman wants to blow the top portion of the sail just like a floater douse. Because of the hotter angles, the douse has to be quick or you will make Dr. Doom’s calendar. Have fun and I look forward to reading how your race went!
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Old 09-17-2009
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I've been initiated to assyms on a small sportboat, with a sprit. Cuts vary, but generally I think they're much more jib than spinnaker, useless on a deep broad reach or a run, unless you can wing out, as they just get blanketed otherwise. And being a big sail you have to reach with to get it to fill, the risk of being overpowered sideways is always there.

Jibing "inside" (most do this) means you have to get the sail fully "wiped" past itself and onto the new jibe *before* you can head up past a run. Pain in the neck if it fills behind the headstay instead of in front of it

I prefer syms. They're "real" spinnakers, not these big, hard-to-jibe reachers.

But good luck anyway.
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Old 09-18-2009
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Thanks very much guys! I'm actually kind of glad it acts more like a jib or a genny. The boat is an E33 so I think it's a bit smaller, 3 man crew.

Generally speaking I do foredeck or I'm the middle guy. I'm comfortable pretty much anywhere. We're heading out to do some practice, so we'll iron that out a little bit.

Thanks John, George, and Tom. I will reread your posts again. More advice is always welcome.

I don't think we'll be kicking too much butt in our first few races...
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