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  #1  
Old 01-10-2010
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London Boat Show 2010

We spent our annual day at the London Boat Show today. Main change was that it was much smaller than last year, with fewer vendors and exhibits. As a result, there were some boats not there that we would have liked to have seen (like the Beneteau First boats). There was quite a bit less foot traffic in the isles, and the on-the-water part was also closed because of snow and ice.

All in all, though, we had a great time. The high light of the trip was getting to meet Paul and Sheryl Shard of the "Distant Shores" television series, and they were quiet enthused to see their new Southerly 49, fresh from the factory:

New Boat Blog

They have had a Southerly 42 for some time now, and now they will have a larger version (which included having the galley higher in the deck saloon, with a better view.

We asked directly why they liked the Southerly over an Ovni (since they both have the swinging keels), and their response was that they had cruised with another couple on an Ovni, but it seemed that the couple was always worried about corrosion (at every dock, near other metals, etc.). Maybe they were over concerned, but the Shards knew they would leave their boat in other places for months for a time and didn't want the concern. (Anyway, that was their line.)

I will admit to really liking the Ovnis, and I'm still tempted by used ones (given that the new ones start at 220,000 pounds and go up). However, we did spend some time on a Southerly 110 (35.5 foot boat, swing keel, semi-deck saloon), and I was surprised by how much we liked it. 2.5 foot draft with the keel up, dual rudders. Very functional, very strong, starting at around 170,000 pounds:





We also liked that the show was less crowded, and it was easier to visit some other boats, talk with a man carving a figurehead, enjoy a tot of Old Pulteney 12, and we actually spent some money. A handheld Standard Horizon VHF, a NASA battery monitor, an inverter for a laptop, lots of sweaters and shirts, couple of cold weather hats, a Helly Hansen backpack for my daughter, an anchoring daymark, some new lines, four different sailing magazines for one pound each, and lots of boat literature.

We also got to talk water makers, wind turbines, sail cover repair, and other general boaty stuff. Son went kayaking (indoors). It was a good day-- perhaps more enjoyable than last year. I plan to do some more Southerly research, and I might post a report in the boat review section on the 110 model. Fun.
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Old 01-11-2010
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Thanks for the report. I passed it along to my sailing cousin in Herts!
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Old 01-11-2010
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Jim,

Thanks for the report. I'm envious -- with temps and weather what they've been around here lately, it sure would be nice to get an indoor boating fix right about now.

I'll be interested to hear more about the Southerly. One aspect in particular that I'm curious about, is its ability to "dry out" in extreme tide ranges. Will the tripod created by the twin rudders and keel keep the boat upright, or are "drying out legs" necessary to prevent careening?

Thanks again and stay warm!
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Old 01-11-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnRPollard View Post
I'll be interested to hear more about the Southerly. One aspect in particular that I'm curious about, is its ability to "dry out" in extreme tide ranges. Will the tripod created by the twin rudders and keel keep the boat upright, or are "drying out legs" necessary to prevent careening?
Hi, John

The rep at the show said that Southerly boats dry out flat on their bottoms with no need for legs. Apparently, the keel and keel box are both made of iron, and the box is rather wide like a shoe. He claimed that winter storage was particularly easy-- drop the boat on a railroad tie on the front and back, and no tie downs needed because the weight in the boat is so low.

The low center of gravity is also something the Shards liked about the Southerly boats-- tankage, engine, etc or low in the boat, and they are reported to be quite seaworthy (Sailing Magazine | Southerly 110). I'm intrigued because here in the UK, a good percentage of harbors dry partially or entirely, and if we could take her to the Bahamas some day, even better. There's also lots of canals in Europe to explore.

I also liked that the Yanmar was shaft drive, and the prop enclosure is strong and protective when the boat is on the hard:

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Old 01-11-2010
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I had heard the London show was a bit smaller the other day from a fellow who has a booth there, and runs the Jeanneau owners sites. I guess Jeaneau which usually has a power boat display in one part, sail in another, was all combined this year, with fewer boats!

Guess the economy is hitting over there too!

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Old 01-11-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blt2ski View Post
I had heard the London show was a bit smaller the other day from a fellow who has a booth there, and runs the Jeanneau owners sites. I guess Jeaneau which usually has a power boat display in one part, sail in another, was all combined this year, with fewer boats!

Guess the economy is hitting over there too!

Marty
Yes, the show is much smaller, and there are fewer exhibitors and crowds. However, all that mean for us was that it was easier to look for mark-downs (like a Standard Horizon HX-280 for my son for £80). We ended up buying a lot more than in previous shows, and it was easier to talk to people at the Classic Boats areas and elsewhere.

They say it's the recession making it smaller, especially for the big power boats, as well as the snow that has really slowed down travel over here.
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Old 01-11-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim H View Post
Hi, John

The rep at the show said that Southerly boats dry out flat on their bottoms with no need for legs. Apparently, the keel and keel box are both made of iron, and the box is rather wide like a shoe. He claimed that winter storage was particularly easy-- drop the boat on a railroad tie on the front and back, and no tie downs needed because the weight in the boat is so low.

The low center of gravity is also something the Shards liked about the Southerly boats-- tankage, engine, etc or low in the boat, and they are reported to be quite seaworthy (Sailing Magazine | Southerly 110). I'm intrigued because here in the UK, a good percentage of harbors dry partially or entirely, and if we could take her to the Bahamas some day, even better. There's also lots of canals in Europe to explore.

I also liked that the Yanmar was shaft drive, and the prop enclosure is strong and protective when the boat is on the hard:

That's a good looking boat, so it balances on the retracting keel and the twin rudders? Does the keel have to be retracted before it can sit on the bottom? I really like the color if that particular boat, it's one of the colors I'm considering painting mine.
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Old 01-11-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eMKay View Post
That's a good looking boat, so it balances on the retracting keel and the twin rudders? Does the keel have to be retracted before it can sit on the bottom? I really like the color if that particular boat, it's one of the colors I'm considering painting mine.
I believe the bottom is flat and the keel box is wide and heavy, so the rudders can stay clear of the ground and still have the boat well-balanced. The Prop skeg is also part of ground contact.

What's cool is that the keel is iron and heavy, but it isn't locked down when lowered. You can use it to feel around a shallow bay, and simply raise it when it taps something. It's a push-button hydraulic system, controlled from the helm, for raising and lowering the keel, and it's designed to be adjusted under sail-- down to over seven feet when sailing to windward, and then adjustable to all the way up when running down wind. It does need to be all the way up when drying out the boat, and there's a manual pump and lever in case the electrics are out.

I like that the rudders stay off the bottom, and it's nice that there are two since the hull is relatively flat.
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