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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > General Discussion (sailing related)
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  #1  
Old 01-17-2010
Lost at Si!
 
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oh no! another beginner

oh no, another beginner. I would appreciate the voice of experience on my BIG idea. My wife and I have been planning to purchase a sailboat and live aboard, staying close to the coast of Mexico. We seem to be drawn to the Hunter's, 35' to 40', 30k to 60k range. We live and work together, traveling (on land!) 365 days a year. Our total sailing experience would amount to me sailing around San Diego with my father 30 years ago and now some summer lake sailing. That and we are good swimmers! Are we just insane to think we can jump on board a boat and "learn as we go"? The replies to similar posts (at least the kind ones) always ask about the person's mechanical abilities. Both my wife and I , at the risk of bragging,are both excellent at mechanical work. I have extensive experience in electrical, pluming, engine,HVAC, metal fab and repair. good skills with fiberglass, ok with woodwork. My wife is smart as a whip, great at logistics (the traveling thing)and multilingual. I look forward to your input on our boat selection and other thoughts.
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Old 01-17-2010
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Your goals seem parallel to ours, though we're on the East Coast and been at it for some time. The skills that you mention, that would allow you to be self-sufficient, excell. We've been seasonally cruising from Maine to the Bahamas since 2002. Many stay further south than us. We often anchor out; use many moorings in New England and often stay at marinas for intervals from as long as a couple of days or months. The West Coast seems to have fewer inlets and fewer easy anchorages. I've always thought there was a smaller population of seasonal coastal cruisers in the West. Maybe, it's just easier for "cockpit potatoes" like us to average a fifty mile day between easy stops. So, who are these West Coast cruisers sailing about Mexico? Will lostatsi have a lot of company? Are transient slips, mooring, marinas easy to come by? 'take care and joy, Aythya crew
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Old 01-17-2010
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While your goals are definitely possible, you might want to re-think your choice of boats, as there are many other boats that would probably be far better suited to doing what you're planning. Even though you're planning on "coastal cruising", I'd recommend getting a boat that is built a bit more strongly, since you're more than likely to get caught out by a storm at some point.

I'd also point out that you and your wife should both take ASA 101-105 courses to build a solid foundation of sailing knowledge and skills that are going to be required for cruising. I would highly recommend you take the courses separately, as that is usually far more effective than if you take the courses as a couple.

Before you decide to buy a boat, I would recommend that you both spend some time on different boats, both monohulls and multihulls, so that you get a better idea of what you are looking for in a boat and which boats are best suited to you and your wife.

BTW, once you do have a boat, I would highly recommend that you start with daysailing the boat and working your way up to weekending, then longer coastal trips, then short bluewater passages... and shake down the boat very thoroughly before setting off for Mexico.

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Originally Posted by lostatsi View Post
oh no, another beginner. I would appreciate the voice of experience on my BIG idea. My wife and I have been planning to purchase a sailboat and live aboard, staying close to the coast of Mexico. We seem to be drawn to the Hunter's, 35' to 40', 30k to 60k range. We live and work together, traveling (on land!) 365 days a year. Our total sailing experience would amount to me sailing around San Diego with my father 30 years ago and now some summer lake sailing. That and we are good swimmers! Are we just insane to think we can jump on board a boat and "learn as we go"? The replies to similar posts (at least the kind ones) always ask about the person's mechanical abilities. Both my wife and I , at the risk of bragging,are both excellent at mechanical work. I have extensive experience in electrical, pluming, engine,HVAC, metal fab and repair. good skills with fiberglass, ok with woodwork. My wife is smart as a whip, great at logistics (the traveling thing)and multilingual. I look forward to your input on our boat selection and other thoughts.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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Old 01-17-2010
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I agree with the sailing courses. Well worth the money. If you do buy a boat before you get all the courses - at least hire an experienced sailor/instructor and have them teach you as much as possible about your boat and sailing it.

Whatever you do - go for it!
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Old 01-18-2010
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Thanks so much. Looking into courses. Would like to hear your thoughts on good boats.
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Old 01-18-2010
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As for possible boats, these are the ones that pop to mind immediately:

Monohulls:

CS 36T
Alberg 37
Southern Cross 35 or 39
Hallberg Rassy Rasmus 35
C&C 38 or 38 Landfall
Tartan 35

Multihulls:

Iroquois Mk II
Gemini 105 Mc
Prout Snowgoose 37
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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