Full or partial battens? - Page 4 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree4Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #31  
Old 10-15-2012
RichH's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,796
Thanks: 9
Thanked 68 Times in 61 Posts
Rep Power: 15
RichH will become famous soon enough
Re: Full or partial battens?

I design, loft and make my own sails.

My preference for a cruising Cross-cut or 'radial' cut high aspect dacron mainsail is:
1. two full batten + 2 long tapered battens + 3 auxiliary battens ( between two full battens and the head).
Reason:
The full battens will lessen flogging at the top section, where the proper amount of twist is already 'set'/designed into the sail.
The long tapered lower battens makes it easier to reef and are subject to less chafe when reefed.
The short aux. battens help support the sections between the head and battens #1 & #2 & #3 'when' the leech inevitably become stretched (from aggressive mainsheet pressure as when 'power'-pinching, etc.). Chafe cover 'under' all reef clew position. (chafe patches along where the main hits/rubs on runners and aft shrouds.

2. "over the top" leech line control - leech line along the leech to a cheekblock on the headboard to a sleeve along the luff ... jam cleats at ALL possible reef positions: allows the all important leech tension to be adjusted from the base of the mast (can be arranged for adjustment from back in the cockpit). No need to hang over the side when the boom is 'out' to adjust the leech.
All the reef position luff and leech 'cleats' so arranged/angled so that any tension 'from below' that position automatically 'releases' the 'above' cleat. - a safety consideration and "sail life" consideration --- if the leech is fluttering its destroying itself and its stitching.

3. "Extra length" (10-12") of luff boltrope, 'stored' at the headboard - enables easy DIY boltrope adjustment when the boltrope inevitably shrinks (hysterisis) due to cyclical halyard loads (the chief cause of 'baggy'/blown-out mainsail) ... such will enable easy restoration of sail SHAPE, by cutting the sail twine binding, remeasuring to the 'as designed' luff, hand sewing with sail needle, palm, and sailmakers twine. Dacron sails when used 'hard' typically need boltrope adjustment at ~200 hrs. or at least 'seasonally'. Dont do this and you wind up with a draft-aft, over-drafted, sail with a too tight leech. Sail lofts dont like to do this, as they sell far less mainsails because of this.
When buying a 'new' dacron sail ... affix the head to 'something fixed', slightly raise the tack and hang a ~15lb weight to give constant tension to the luff .....'carefully' measure and record the luff length, so you know how much to adjust that bolt-rope when ultimately that boltrope shrinks.

4. Triple stitching on all seams with GoreTex Tenara PTFE thread - immune to UV damage, costly but cheaper than a 'restitch' job.

5. Reinforcement (small) triangular 'patches' at all panel seams at the leech -- thats where all stitching begins to break. Lessens the potential of having a 'zipper' occur during 'blammo' wind conditions. I also prefer to use PECO double sided sailmakers seam tape 'between' all the panel seams (belts and suspenders, in case the stitching does break - the PECO tape 'may' hold the sail together until proper repair).

All the above will double or even triple the working service life of a woven dacron sail used for extensive cruising. My preference for distance cruising is high mod. woven dacron in a cross-cut config.: for more shape adjustability and 'service life' and is much easier to 'correct' when a 'restitch' is needed.
Faster and chef2sail like this.

Last edited by RichH; 10-15-2012 at 12:04 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #32  
Old 10-15-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: British Columbia
Posts: 2,315
Thanks: 19
Thanked 32 Times in 31 Posts
Rep Power: 3
Brent Swain is on a distinguished road
Re: Full or partial battens?

My first mainsail was falling apart by the time I first crossed the Pacific with it. I had the roach cut off ,and got another 3,000 miles out of i, without popping a stitch. Battens are responsible for 80% of sail repairs. I havent had a mainsail with battens since the early 70s.
Two boats with full length battens came thru Fanning Island a while back. When I asked them what they thought of full length battens, they said " Battens suck." After they had sailed to New Zealand and back to BC, I asked them again, and they said" "Battens still suck"
The best cruising mainsails have no battens.
__________________
Brent Swain, Boat designer, Builder, and author of "Origami Metal Boatbuilding"
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #33  
Old 10-15-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Dunedin, Florida
Posts: 182
Thanks: 2
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 4
HeartsContent is on a distinguished road
Re: Full or partial battens?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
Two boats with full length battens came thru Fanning Island a while back. When I asked them what they thought of full length battens, they said " Battens suck." After they had sailed to New Zealand and back to BC, I asked them again, and they said" "Battens still suck"
Well that changes everything!
__________________
Catalina 36 MKII
Florida
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #34  
Old 10-16-2012
blt2ski's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 6,678
Thanks: 0
Thanked 20 Times in 19 Posts
Rep Power: 10
blt2ski will become famous soon enough
Re: Full or partial battens?

this looks like an ignoramous thread, that is when threads get dug up that are some two to three years old........ignoring!
chef2sail likes this.
__________________
She drives me boat,
I drives me dinghy!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fully battened main CMcLean Gear & Maintenance 4 05-13-2011 11:08 PM
tapering full battens deniseO30 Gear & Maintenance 8 05-10-2010 05:24 PM
Which pocket cruiser is best for me ? dpcolohan Boat Review and Purchase Forum 31 03-02-2008 05:21 PM
tapered battens Randolph Bertin Gear & Maintenance 4 02-01-2007 06:55 PM
Mainsail Details Brian Hancock Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 06-19-2000 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:30 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.